Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Pim: สวัสดีค่ะ(sà-wàt-dii khâ)
Ryan: Ryan here! Thai Absolute Beginner Season 1, Lesson 9 - Can I Get Your Number in Thailand? In this lesson, you'll learn how to express ownership in Thai.
Pim: "ใช่ค่ะ(châi khâ)" "That's right!"
Ryan: So, "khruu" Pim, where does this conversation take place?
Pim: "ที่สนามบินค่ะ(thîi sà-năam bin khâ)," which is "at the airport." Steve's flight has already landed. And it's time to say good-bye to "khun" Supanee, so they exchange their name cards for further contact. "เอาล่ะค่ะไปฟังบทสนทนากันเลยดีกว่า(ao lâ khâ bpai fang bòt sŏn-thá-naa gan looei dii gwàa)" Let's listen to the conversation!

Lesson conversation

พนักงานสนามบิน: ผู้โดยสารที่ถือหนังสือเดินทางไทย เชิญทางนี้ค่ะ (phûu-dooi-sǎan thîi thǔue nǎng-sǔue-dooen-thaang thai chooen thaang níi khâ)
สตีฟ: คุณสุภาณี ทางนี้ครับ (khun sù-phaa-nii thaang níi khráp)
สุภาณี: ขอบคุณค่ะ (khàawp-khun khâ)
สตีฟ: นี่นามบัตรของผมครับ (nîi naam-bàt khǎawng phǒm khráp)
สุภาณี: ขอบคุณค่ะ นี่นามบัตรของดิฉันค่ะ แล้วคุยกันค่ะ (khàawp-khun khâ. nîi naam-bàt khǎawng dì-chǎn khâ. láaeo khui-gan khâ)
สตีฟ: โชคดีครับ (chôok-dii khráp)
Ryan: Once again slowly.
พนักงานสนามบิน: ผู้โดยสารที่ถือหนังสือเดินทางไทย เชิญทางนี้ค่ะ (phûu-dooi-sǎan thîi thǔue nǎng-sǔue-dooen-thaang thai chooen thaang níi khâ)
สตีฟ: คุณสุภาณี ทางนี้ครับ (khun sù-phaa-nii thaang níi khráp)
สุภาณี: ขอบคุณค่ะ (khàawp-khun khâ)
สตีฟ: นี่นามบัตรของผมครับ (nîi naam-bàt khǎawng phǒm khráp)
สุภาณี: ขอบคุณค่ะ นี่นามบัตรของดิฉันค่ะ แล้วคุยกันค่ะ (khàawp-khun khâ. nîi naam-bàt khǎawng dì-chǎn khâ. láaeo khui-gan khâ)
สตีฟ: โชคดีครับ (chôok-dii khráp)
Ryan: Once again with the English.
พนักงานสนามบิน: ผู้โดยสารที่ถือหนังสือเดินทางไทย เชิญทางนี้ค่ะ (phûu-dooi-sǎan thîi thǔue nǎng-sǔue-dooen-thaang thai chooen thaang níi khâ)
Ryan: Passengers with Thai passports, this way please.
สตีฟ: คุณสุภาณี ทางนี้ครับ (khun sù-phaa-nii thaang níi khráp)
Ryan: Ms. Supanee, this way.
สุภาณี: ขอบคุณค่ะ (khàawp-khun khâ)
Ryan: Thank you.
สตีฟ: นี่นามบัตรของผมครับ (nîi naam-bàt khǎawng phǒm khráp)
Ryan: This is my name card.
สุภาณี: ขอบคุณค่ะ นี่นามบัตรของดิฉันค่ะ แล้วคุยกันค่ะ (khàawp-khun khâ. nîi naam-bàt khǎawng dì-chǎn khâ. láaeo khui-gan khâ)
Ryan: Thank you. This is my name card. Talk to you soon.
สตีฟ: โชคดีครับ (chôok-dii khráp)
Ryan: Good luck.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Ryan: "Khruu" Pim, we have known each other for quite a while, but I don't think I know your family name. Do you mind if I ask?
Pim: "ไม่ค่ะ(mâi khâ)," which is "no." But my family name is so long that you won't remember it anyway!
Ryan: Yeah, I notice that family names of Thais are often very long, sometimes containing more than five syllables! Doesn't it get complicated when you call each other?
Pim: No, because we usually call others by their first names. And if you are close to them, you can even call them by their nicknames!
Ryan: So every Thai person has a nickname?
Pim: "ใช่ค่ะ(châi khâ)," which is "yes!"
Ryan: What is your nickname then, "khruu" Pim?
Pim: It is "Pim," the same as my first name. For those whose names have only one syllable, the first names are often also their nicknames!
Ryan: Wow, I want one too!
Pim: Really? Okay, let me think. Your name is "ไรอัน(rai-ân)," starting with "ร(raaw-ruuea)"... How about "รัก(rák)," which means "love?"
Ryan: "ขอบคุณครับครูพิม(khàawp-khun khráp khruu phim)" Thanks a lot "khruu" Pim, but I might just have to ask a guy friend to get a more manly sounding nickname.
Pim: Ha ha. Okay, on to the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Ryan: Let's take a look at the vocabulary and phrase list for this lesson. The first word is:
Pim: นี้ (níi) [natural native speed]
Ryan: This.
Pim: นี้ (níi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. นี้ (níi) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Next.
Pim: ของ (khǎawng) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Of or thing.
Pim: ของ (khǎawng) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. ของ (khǎawng) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Next.
Pim: นามบัตร (naam-bàt) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Name card.
Pim: นามบัตร (naam-bàt) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. นามบัตร (naam-bàt) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Next.
Pim: ทาง (thaang) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Way or path.
Pim: ทาง (thaang) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. ทาง (thaang) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Next.
Pim: ทางนี้ (thaang níi) [natural native speed]
Ryan: This way.
Pim: ทางนี้ (thaang níi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. ทางนี้ (thaang níi) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Next.
Pim: แล้วคุยกัน (láaeo khui-gan) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Talk to you soon.
Pim: แล้วคุยกัน (láaeo khui-gan) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. แล้วคุยกัน (láaeo khui-gan) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Next.
Pim: โชคดี (chôok-dii) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Good luck.
Pim: โชคดี (chôok-dii) [slowly - broken down by syllable]. โชคดี (chôok-dii) [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Ryan: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. And the first phrase is?
Pim: "ทางนี้(thaang níi)"
Ryan: "This way."
Pim: This phrase is straightforward. "ทาง(thaang)" means "way," and "นี้(níi)" means "this."
Ryan: What if I want to say "that way?" I guess the word "ทาง(thaang)" remains and we just replace the word "นี้(níi)" with some other word?
Pim: "ใช่ค่ะ(châi khâ)," "that's right." "That" is "นั้น(nán)," so "that way" should be…?"
Ryan: "ทางนั้น(thaang nán)"
Pim: Good!
Ryan: Can we hear these two phrases again? Okay, please repeat after "khruu" Pim.
Pim: "ทางนี้(thaang níi)" [pause] "ทางนั้น(thaang nán)" [pause]
Ryan: Let's move to the next phrase.
Pim: "โชคดี(chôok-dii)"
Ryan: "Good luck!"
Pim: We often say "โชคดี(chôok-dii)" in a situation when parting with someone who we won't supposedly see for a while.
Ryan: Okay. What should I say to my colleague, who I am going to see again tomorrow, when I am getting off work?
Pim: You should say "แล้วเจอกัน(láaeo jooe gan)," which means "see you later."
Ryan: "แล้วเจอกัน(láaeo jooe gan)." That sounds a lot like the line from the conversation, "แล้วคุยกัน(láaeo khui gan)." Do they mean the same thing?
Pim: Almost the same. "แล้วคุยกัน(láaeo khui gan)" means "Talk to you later." "คุย(khui)" is the verb "to talk" or "to chat." I also want to note that, just like in English, "โชคดี(chôok-dii)," which means "good luck!" can be used not only in a parting situation, but also when you want to bless someone. For example, your friend is going to take an exam and you wish him his best. You can say "โชคดี(chôok-dii)" to him.
Ryan: All right. Let's practice these phrases by repeating after "khruu" Pim.
Pim: "โชคดี(chôok-dii)" [pause] "แล้วเจอกัน(láaeo jooe gan)" [pause] "แล้วคุยกัน(láaeo khui gan)" [pause]

Lesson focus

Ryan: Okay, let's move on to the grammar section. In this lesson, we'll learn about the use of the word "ของ(khǎawng)," meaning "of," to show possession.
Pim: Right. We will start with how to generate possessive adjectives in Thai. By placing the word "ของ(khǎawng)" before a pronoun, the phrase becomes a possessive adjective. For example, "ผม(phŏm)" or "ดิฉัน(dì-chăn)" is "I." "ของผม(khǎawng phŏm)" or "ของดิฉัน(khǎawng dì-chăn)" means?
Ryan: "My."
Pim: That's right! Then you show possession of things by adding them in front of the possessive adjectives. For example, "หมา(măa)" is a "dog." How can you say "my dog" in Thai?
Ryan: "หมาของผม(măa khǎawng phŏm)." Okay, repeat after "khruu" Pim. "My dog."
Pim: "หมาของผม(măa khǎawng phŏm)" [pause] Okay, now I have various pronouns. Ryan, please change them into possessive adjectives. "คุณ(khun)" is "you," "เขา(khăo)" is "he" or "she," "พวกเรา(phûuak rao)" is "we," and "พวกเขา(phûuak khăo)" is "they."
Ryan: Those would be "ของคุณ(khǎawng khun)," which is "your." "ของเขา (khǎawng khăo)" is "his" or "her." "ของพวกเรา(khǎawng phûuak rao)" is "our." "ของพวกเขา(khǎawng phûuak khăo)" is "their."
Pim: Good job! Now, let's practice with some more examples. "โรงเรียน(roong-riian)" is a "school." What is "our school?"
Ryan: "โรงเรียนของพวกเรา(roong-riian khǎawng phûuak rao)"
Pim: Okay. Next, "คอมพิวเตอร์(khawm-phiu-dtôoe)" is a "computer." "คอมพิวเตอร์ของคุณ(khawm-phiu-dtôoe khǎawng khun)" means?
Ryan: "Your computer."
Pim: That's right!
Ryan: "Khruu" Pim, if the owner is not indicated by pronouns but by nouns, what should I say?
Pim: That's easy. ของ(khǎawng) can be used in the exact same way with nouns. In this case, "ของ(khǎawng)" is equivalent to "of" or ""the "-'s" in English. For example, "คอมพิวเตอร์ของครูพิม(khawm-phiu-dtôoe khǎawng khruu phim)" means "khruu Pim's computer."
Ryan: Wow, that's convenient!
Pim: Okay. Now, let's practice more. Do you remember how to say "bank employee?"
Ryan: "พนักงานธนาคาร(phá-nák-ngaan thá-naa-khaan)"
Pim: That's right! And "แม่(mâae)" means "mother." So how would you say "Steve's mother is a bank employee?"
Ryan: "แม่ของสตีฟเป็นพนักงานธนาคาร(mâae khǎawng sà-dtíip bpen phá-nák-ngaan thá-naa-khaan)"
Pim: Very good. Now how about pretend you don't know what Steve's father does for a living and you want to ask him. Here's a hint, "father" is "พ่อ(phâaw)."
Ryan: Well, let's see. If Steve is the person I'm asking, then I need to say "your father." So that would be "พ่อของคุณ(phâaw khǎawng khun)." Then to ask "What is your father's occupation" I'd have to say "พ่อของคุณทำงานเป็นอะไรครับ(phâaw khǎawng khun tham-ngaan bpen a-rai khráp)."
Pim: Good job. Now, before we go, I wanted to mention one more thing about "ของ(khǎawng)." It can also be used without a noun in front of it to form a possessive pronoun. So "บ้านของดิฉัน(bâan khǎawng dì-chăn)" means "my house," but if you ask me the question "which house?" I can just answer back "ของดิฉัน(khǎawng dì-chăn)" and that means "mine."
Ryan: I see. So "ของคุณ(khǎawng khun)" can mean "yours" and "ของพวกเรา(khǎawng phûuak rao)" can mean "ours." Is that right?
Pim: "ใช่ค่ะ(châi khâ)," "that's right!" "มีคำถามอะไรไหมคะ(mii kham-thăam a-rai mái khá)"
Ryan: "Do you have any questions?"
Pim: If you do, please let us know in the comment section. "แล้วพบกันใหม่ค่ะ(láaeo phóp gan mài khâ)"
Ryan: "See you next time!"

47 Comments

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ThaiPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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Hello everyone! Lets practice Thai numbers!

ThaiPod101.com
Friday at 2:40 pm
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Hello Kent,


Thank you very much for your comment. I will let our team know and consider fixing it. Please feel free to let me know if you have any questions.


Have a nice day.


Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Kent
Tuesday at 10:25 pm
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Hi


In lesson 9 Can I Get Your Number in Thailand?


I find translation wrong in "lesson audio English translation "


A: ผู้โดยสารที่ถือหนังสือเดินทางไทย เชิญทางนี้ค่ะ

A: Passengers with Thai passports, this way please.


but in lesson audio

2:29~2:32

A: Passengers with foreign passports, this way please.


It's opponent meaning.


ThaiPod101.com
Tuesday at 8:37 pm
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Hello Matt,


Thank you very much for your comment and question. Yes, you understood right. "The library's computer" is คอมพิวเตอร์ ของ ห้องสมุด Hope that's help. Please feel free to ask if you have any questions about Thai language. I will be glad to help you. We wish you will have a good progress with Thai language. Thanks again for your support.


Have a nice day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Matt
Sunday at 10:04 am
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Do objects have the same grammar rules for the possessive? For example, "The library's computer" would be คอมพิวเตอร์ ของ ห้องสมุด. Is that correct?

Thanks.

ThaiPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 2:33 am
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Hello Jim,


Thank you very much for your comment and question. For us "mái" is always sounds the same, never change and not same as "may" even sometime you may hear so. Right spelling is ถือ = and yes it's means "to hold". เชิญ means "please (when used as an invitation); to ask or invite". Hope that's help. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help. We wish you will have a good progress with your Thai.


Have a nice day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

ThaiPod101.comVerified
Monday at 9:16 pm
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Hi Jim,


We include a limited number of words in the [Vocabulary] section, however, to check out more words/sentences, please use our Dictionary (includes audio):

https://www.thaipod101.com/thai-dictionary/


You can also create your own Custom Lists. Please check out this link for more information:

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Regarding your pronunciation question, our team will soon give you a reply.


We hope this helps! In case of any questions, please feel free to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

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Jim Sherod
Monday at 6:54 am
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What does "เชิญ" mean?

Please add to the vocab listing for this lesson.

Jim Sherod
Monday at 6:52 am
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นังสือเดินทาง (nǎng-sǔue-dooen-thaang) is passport.... literally "book travel" or "travel book"

Please add นังสือเดินทาง to the vocabulary listing for this lesson.

Jim Sherod
Monday at 6:46 am
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ถือห = hold (as in "those who hold Thai passports")

Please add this to your vocabulary listing.

Jim Sherod
Monday at 6:41 am
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In the question, "mii kham-thăam a-rai mái khá" the "mái" sounds like the English pronunciation "may" instead of "mai".... So when a native Thai speaker is speaking fast, is that the sound it makes... "may" instead of "mai"?