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Lesson Transcript

สวัสดีค่ะ, ดิฉันปรารถนาค่ะ! Welcome to Thaipod101.com’s ตัวอักษรไทย Made Easy!
The fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn the Thai alphabet: ตัวอักษรไทย!
In the last lesson you learned the letter ค and the vowels สระ อึ and สระ อื. Do you remember how to write them all?
In this lesson, you’re going to learn about 2 low class consonants and a pair of vowels.
The first low class consonant of this lesson is ท (thaaw thá-hǎan). The word ทหาร ( thá-hǎan) means "soldier". The sound of ท when it's an initial letter is "th" like the "T" in the word "top". There should be a puff of air coming out of your mouth when you make this sound. When it's the final consonant in a syllable, ท makes a T-stop just like ด.
ท looks like the shape of a hill. So you can remember ท by thinking of a soldier standing on top of a hill.
Let's write ท together. Start with the head, then draw a line going down. Now make an arch going to the right. ท
The second low-class consonant of this lesson is ฮ (haaw nók-hûuk). Do you know which animal it's named after? นกฮูก (nók-hûuk) is Thai for "owl". Maybe you didn't know that we have owls in Thailand too! ฮ makes a "h" sound, just like the H in "hoot". This letter is only used as an initial sound in a syllable, never as a final sound.
Maybe you can remember ฮ because it looks a little like the shape of an owl's eye. And owls make the sound "hoot-hoot", which starts with an H.
Let's practice writing ฮ together.
Start with the head, curl around to the top, and add a loop. ฮ
Now let's learn some new vowels.
First we have สระ เอ (sà-rà ee). This is a long vowel that makes the sound "ee" like the "AY" in "gray".
Remember that some vowels are written above, below, in front, or behind a consonant. สระ เอ is one that is written in front of a consonant. This might seem strange at first, but with a little practice you'll get used to reading it like this.
Here is the word เฮง (heeng), which means "to be fortunate".
Do you know the tone? เฮง has a low class consonant with a live syllable ending, so it's mid tone.
สระ เอ,ฮ, ง... เฮง .
Here is another word. Can you read it?
It's เทพ (thêep). เทพ means an "angel". เทพ is a falling tone.
Now let's write it:
สระ เอ, ท, พ... เทพ
Remember that most vowels come in long and short pairs. The shorter version of สระ เอ is สระ เอะ (sà-rà è). It makes the sound "e" like the E in the word "red". สระ เอะ can be written two different ways depending on whether or not there is a consonant following it.
The basic way is to write สระ เอ followed by a consonant, and then สระ อะ.
For example, Here is the word เฟะ (fé), which means "rotten".
สระ เอ, ฟ, สระ อะ... เฟะ
When there is a consonant following สระ เอะ, we have to write it differently. Instead of writing สระ อะ after the consonant, we'll write a different symbol above the consonant. This little symbol is called ไม้ไต่คู้ (mái dtài-khúu). It has the same shape as the number 8 in Thai. You write it as a squiggly line that starts with the head on the right-hand side.
Here is the word เช็ค (chék), which has the same meaning as the English noun "check".
Above ช we'll write ไม้ไต่คู้.
สระ เอ, ช, ไม้ไต่คู้, ค... เช็ค
Now it's time for Pradthana's Points.
As you can see from this lesson, Thai is not read in a straight line from left to right. You always need to look around the consonants to see which ones have vowels attached to them. There is usually no space between words in Thai, so you have to get used to looking for groups of consonants and vowels that make syllables. When you can spot the syllables it's much easier to tell where one word stops and the next word starts.
Do you know the Thai word for "cat"? In the next ตัวอักษรไทย Made Easy Lesson you'll learn how to write it! See you there! สวัสดีค่ะ!

75 Comments

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ThaiPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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What Thai words can you write using ท (Thaaw thá-hǎan), ฮ (Haaw nók-hûuk), เอะ (Short e), or เอ (Long e)?

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:55 PM
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Hi Jin,


Thank you. Letter only have two position in syllable, you could see theep/angle "th" still situated at the beginning of a syllable. Word contain initail letter + vowel + ending letter 👍 Just sometime vowels appear around consonant but it sound still be in the middle of a syllable when we read. Hope that helps. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

ปริษา Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Jin
Tuesday at 06:29 PM
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I have a question, like ท (thá-hǎan) is /th/ as an initial sound, and a t stop at the end. what about in the middle? I got confuse midway, especially during the theep/angle. the H sounds more than the /th/, like it comes out more from the nose. am i right? is this something to lookout for?

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 02:34 AM
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Hello Barry and เดวิด


Thank you. ก็ is a special exception not follow the rule, it written with short vowel but the sound is long when we really speak. Normally แอะ vowel in the middle of a syllable like แตะ become แต็ก when there is ก as a final consonant. เดวิด only with the initail consonants is Low class consonant and it is a dead syllable. Hope that helps. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

ปริษา Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

เดวิด
Monday at 02:19 PM
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To determine tone, when are we supposed to check vowel length?


In some examples on this website, vowel length is checked. In other examples, it is not.

Barry
Sunday at 11:09 PM
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Hello, just a question about the ไม้ไต่คู้. I came across this word ก็. I was told that the ไม้ไต่คู้ replaces เ-าะ and not สระ เอะ. I also find it strange that in the word ก็, ไม้ไต่คู้ is used because there is no consonant next to the word. Could you please explain it to me? An even stranger thing to me is that ก็ is pronounced with a falling tone? Shouldn't a short vowel and a mid-class consonant be pronounced with a low tone? Thank you!

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 02:00 AM
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Hello เดวิด,


Thank you. As I reply to your previous comments. There is one more thing here missing

For เฮง, we were told "Low class initial consonant + live ending = mid tone."

For เทพ, we were told "Low class initial consonant + dead ending **+ long vowel เ = falling tone." / if the vowel is short the syllable will become "high tone".

Hope that helps. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

ปริษา Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

เดวิด
Friday at 09:57 PM
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In this lesson, we were challenged to determine what tone would be used to pronounce the words เฮง and เทพ.


For เฮง, we were told "Low class initial consonant + live ending = mid tone."


For เทพ, we were told "Low class initial consonant + dead ending = falling tone."


In both examples, why didn't we look at the vowel length to determine tone?


I don't understand why in some examples, we do look at vowel length, whereas in other examples (like เฮง and เทพ), vowel length is ignored.


Also, what does the spoken tone of a word have to do with the tonal markers?

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:46 PM
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Hi mazataud,


Thank you. sà-rà ù and sà-rà é , there are two different vowel so their sound are totally different. u and e with high tone, maybe try saying u in "fruit" and e in "get" or "set", would show you there different. naan mean "for a long time" and yaao " long distance such as long hair/ long arm and etc...". Hope that helps. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

ปริษา Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

mazataud
Wednesday at 01:50 AM
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hello

how do you distinguish the accent for the sound of the vowel (sà-rà ù and sà-rà é )with the mark of the high tone ?

2 words for long : naan and yaao is that correct ?

thank you very much

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Sunday at 02:13 AM
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Hello Stevens,


Thank you for comment. Here we just talk about how we spell the word ก็ which is special and not follow vowel and spelling rules. You're are right ก็ is used for "then" and can be used as "aslo or as well" , can also be uased as a linking word. Hope that’s helpful. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

ปริษา Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com