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Lesson Transcript

สวัสดีค่ะ, ดิฉันปรารถนาค่ะ! Welcome to Thaipod101.com’s ตัวอักษรไทย Made Easy!
The fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn the Thai alphabet: ตัวอักษรไทย!
In the last lesson you learned the letters ร and ล and the vowels สระ แอะ and สระ แอ. Do you remember how to write them all?
In this lesson, you’re going to learn about 3 middle class consonants and a pair of vowels.
The 3 consonants you'll learn in this lesson are middle class consonants. So far, you've learned 3 other middle class consonants and the rest have been low class consonants. Do you remember which 3 of these letters were middle class? (pause)
ก, ด, and บ
The first new middle class consonant of this lesson is จ (jaaw jaan) . This letter is named after the word จาน (jaan), which means "plate" or "dish". When จ is the initial consonant it makes the sound "j" similar to the J in "jump". When จ is the final consonant, its sound changes to become a T-stop just like the letter ด.
Get your pen ready, and let's practice writing จ.
Start with a clockwise head in the middle, and make the line go down to the right. Then it hooks back up and curves over to the left. จ
Here is the next middle class consonant. It's called ต (dtaaw dtào). The word เต่า (dtào) means "turtle". The sound ต makes as an initial consonant is "dt", which is between an English D and T. In technical terms, the sound of ต is an unaspirated T. As a final consonant it also makes a T-stop.
ต is written almost exactly the same as ด.
The only difference is that ต has a small indentation at the top of the bump.
Maybe you can think of a turtle with a bumpy shell to remember which is which.
Let's write ต together.
A clockwise head, down to the left, up to the top, indentation, and down on the right side. ต
The last consonant of this lesson is ป (bpaaw bplaa). The word ปลา (bplaa) means "fish".
The sound of ป as an initial consonant is "bp", which is in the middle between a regular English B and P. We can also call this an unaspirated P.
As a final consonant, ป makes a P-stop, which is simply done by closing your lips.
You're probably already thinking that ป looks a lot like the letter บ. As you can see, the only difference is that the line on the right side of ป extends higher than the head.
Let's practice writing ป together.
It's very easy. start at the head and then draw 3 straight lines. ป
Let's learn a new vowel pair to write a couple more words.
This is สระ โอะ (sà-rà ò) and สระ โอ (sà-rà oo). They make the vowel sound "o" like the O in "go". Can you guess by looking at them which one is a long vowel and which is a short vowel?
That's right. The short vowel is this one: สระ โอะ
As you can see, สระ โอ is written to the left of the initial consonant.
Here is an example of a word written with สระ โอ. This is the word โจร (joon), which means a "thief" or "robber".
We have to write สระ โอ first, then the initial consonant จ, and after that the final consonant ร. Remember that ร sounds like letter N when it's a final consonant.
สระ โอ, จ, and ร.... โจร
When the short vowel สระ โอะ is followed by a final consonant it will be unwritten.
For example, here is the word บน (bon), which means "above" or "on".
As you can see, the only letters written are the initial consonant บ and the final consonant น.
The vowel is not written, so you just have to remember that a word containing only two consonants and nothing else will have a short vowel "o" in the middle.
Now it's time for Pradthana's Points.
If you're in Thailand, one way to practice reading is to look at the Thai names of products when you go shopping. Often you already know the name of the product or the brand, which can make it easier to read the whole word. For example, see if you can read the label on a Thai bottle of Coke. You'll notice that the name Coke is written using a stylish version of the สระ โอ that we learned in this lesson.
Do you know how to ask the question "who" in Thai? In the next ตัวอักษรไทย Made Easy Lesson you'll learn how to say it, and most importantly, how to write it! See you there! สวัสดีค่ะ!

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ThaiPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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What Thai words can you write with จ (Jaaw jaan), ต (Dtaaw dtào), ป (Bpaaw bplaa), โอะ (Short o), or โอ (Long o)?

 

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Friday at 02:07 PM
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Hello Rigel,


Thnak you for comment. ร make an "n" sound as a final consonant just like น "naaw-nuu" does. keep practice listen and you will find out more about them. Around yourself with native speaker whenever you have chance would help a lot. Like it the word "soilder ทหาร ta-haan" but end with "ร". Yes, โจร joon (informal) is a noun and ขโมย ka-mooi (formal) can either be a noun or verb to steal. The different is just โจร is more casual. Hope that's help. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Rigel
Tuesday at 09:15 PM
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Hi.


I have a question. How come (joon) was spelled in the transcript with (raaw ruuea) rather than with (naaw nuu)? I understand that (raaw ruuea) sounds like "N" when it is the last consonant, but (naaw nuu) is, by default, "N".


Also, I tried to google translate (joon) and the word "thief" and "robber", it is has a different translation - ขโมย (K̄hmoy).


Thank you in advance.

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Friday at 08:34 PM
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Hello Dat,


Maybe you were right because ch and sh are really similar sound. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Friday at 12:58 PM
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Hi Dat,


I would say from the song it clearly that "chan" is not pronounce "san /shan ซัน " or else, it ฉัน(spelling)/ชั้น(speaking). As I say, people who not a native hearing different sound. For ร and ล sound, there are people who get lazy and don't want to pronounce ร, they're does not interchangeable in spelling but people speak that way anyway. Sometime native themself doesn't spell words correcctly so they say ร and ล mixed them up. Hope that's help. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Dat
Tuesday at 12:45 AM
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Hey it's me again. I'm still confused.

1. From your previous answer, I get that ร /r/ and /L/ can be used interchangeably?

2. Also from this song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f05VJ1moOKE , there's no way the ฉัน is pronounced /chan/ cause it's very clear it's some sort of /shan/ or /san/. It's the first word of the song and I've heard it no less than 50 times (Cause I like the song). The other /ch/ word, the /ch/ is pronounced very clearly. So would you please provide me some explanation? It would be much appreciated.

Looking forward to your reply.

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:48 PM
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Hello Dat,


Thank you for comment. I'm agree with ร r become "L" in speaking language but "ch" to "sh" I'm not really agree, also its depend on where you are from and how you personally say "sh" sound. I compare it with some English words such as "chart/charge or check" it's sound pretty much same as Thai "ch". Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Dat
Sunday at 01:06 AM
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Hi. I have a question. I watched a lot of Thai videos (with subtitles of course) and noticed some anomalies:

Firstly, it seems like a lot of times, Thai people usually pronounce the letter ร as l and not r. Like the word รัก sometimes is rák and sometimes is lák.

Secondly, the /ch/ sound like in ฉัน sometimes becomes /sh/. In a song, all the ฉัน is shan.

So I would like to ask if there's a situation where those two anomalies would apply.

Looking forward to your reply.

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:27 PM
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Hello everyone,


Thank you for comment ka khun Kim. Khun Nekkoolai, you can tell when two consonant are together and not clusted. Example: นม ขนม(ขะ-หนม) ชม ลม ผสม(ผะ-สม) Hope that’s help. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

nekkooolai
Monday at 09:43 PM
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How will I know if there's an o between two consonants?

Kim-André Myrvang
Sunday at 12:52 PM
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Thanks for teaching me what an unaspirated consonant is. The "holding a hand over the mouth"-trick was very effective.