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Lesson Transcript

Hi everyone.
Welcome to The Ultimate Thai Pronunciation Guide.
In this lesson, you'll learn the final 3 consonant sounds in Thai.
These consonant sounds do not appear in English, so they'll likely be unfamiliar to you.
Be sure to practice these sounds, as these are the sounds that learners often get wrong.
Are you ready?
Then let's get started!
The first consonant sound is...
"ร
รอ Waiting
รัก Love
ร้อน Hot"
This is also known as a rolled R, or a Spanish R. Contact the gums directly behind the top teeth with the tip of your tongue, build pressure behind the gums and then flick the tongue upwards rapidly to release. The small passage created by the gums and the tongue should open and close rapidly -- as if your tongue is fluttering or vibrating against the gums. It sounds almost like a rapid "D" sound.
When building up pressure behind the tip of the tongue, rapidly brush the tip up and back, against the gumridge. As you do so, you should feel a vibrating sensation behind your gumridge.
It's like striking your gumridge, and then again *behind* the gumridge with the tip of your tongue, in one quick up and back motion.
One useful trick, is to repeat the word "butter" or "ladder" really *really* quickly. This will help you to get the 'tapping', or flicking sensation.
Yet another trick, is to think of olden day movies. Do you remember how Dracula first introduced himself? Like DO-RA-CU-LA. Try to say it like this multiple times. You want to focus on the D and R sound in the word "dracula". This *very* quick transitioning from the D to the R can sometimes allow you to prononuce the rolled R sound.
OK. Let's breakdown this sound. Listen to Jay.
ร, ร (slowly)
ร, ร (slowly)
The next consonant is...
"จ
จาน Plate
เจ็บ Painful
จน Poor"
This consonant is similar to the 'ch' sound in English. English however, focuses the tip of the tongue to contact the gum ridge, while in Thai, the middle part of the tongue, known as the blade of the tongue, is used to contact the area *behind* the gumridge. Also, this is an unaspirated sound, meaning there shouldn't be a burst of air when pronouncing this sound.
One useful trick, is to repeat the word "question" to practice this sound. The sound created in "question", is the closest English equivalent to this Thai sound.
OK. Let's breakdown this sound. Listen to Jay.
จ, จ (slowly)
จ, จ (slowly)
The final consonant sound is...
"ฉ,ช,ฌ
ช้า Slow
ฉัน I/Me
ชาม Bowl"
This is identical to the previous sound, but aspirated, meaning there *should* be a burst of air when pronouncing this sound. It's very similar to the English 'ch' sound as in 'church'. Like the previous sound however, you want to use the blade of the tongue to contact the area just behind the gumridge. Listen to Jay.
ฉ/ช/ฌ, ฉ/ช/ฌ (slowly)
ฉ/ช/ฌ, ฉ/ช/ฌ (slowly)
Well done! You just learned the final 3 consonant sounds in Thai.
We've covered every single sound that could possibly appear in the Thai language. You can now pronounce anything in Thai! Isn't that great?
How difficult were they to learn? Please comment and share your thoughts.
See you in the next Ultimate Thai Pronunciation Guide lesson!

36 Comments

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ThaiPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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You can now pronounce anything in Thai! Isn't that great?
How difficult were they to learn?

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 01:18 PM
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Hello Kenneth and David,


Thank you. Kenneth and also David, Is this will help make "r" sound? If you let air out and relax your tongue , let tip of your tongue roll follow an air. David, ช้า have one vowel า and one tone mark ้ ชา means "tea" mid tone then add tone mark ช้า mean slow "high tone". Hope that's help. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

ปริษา Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

David
Monday at 06:14 PM
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Good video. The only sound I find difficult to pronounce consistently is the first one: the rolling / trilled / Spanish "R."


Anyway, I have a question. When the video demonstrates how the tɕʰ sound is pronounced, the example of ช้า is used. This word has two vowels: ้ and า. What is the difference between ช้า and ชา, especially since the word is pronounced like there is no "u:" vowel?

Kenneth
Sunday at 08:28 AM
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I'm still really having trouble rolling my R's, especially when the R is preceded by an - a sound hahaha, mine is more of a throat gurgle sounding kind of thing

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Friday at 08:49 PM
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Hello Kadyn,


Thank you for comment. I notice from some Thai learner but just practice with a Thai or with me on the premium plus massage. The "j" sound is harder than "ch" so that the key to help. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a good day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Kadyn Omlid
Wednesday at 05:38 AM
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Hello,


I was wondering, If I have trouble pronouncing J and CH with the middle of my tongue, will Thai people notice?

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:15 PM
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Hello คิมอันดเร้ะ,


Thank you for comment. I think your idea would help other learners. Please feel free to let me know if you have any questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a nice day.

Parisa Koknoi

Team ThaiPod101.com

คิมอันดเร้ะ
Monday at 06:53 PM
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Wow. We make the rolling R's in the Norwegian dialect I was raised with, but I can't imagine learning them as an adult.


I definitely do not put my tongue behind the gums and "build pressure." For me it starts the exact opposite way with the tongue needing to be relaxed.


You have to vibrate the tongue much in the same way that you may vibrate (roll) your lips when you sigh. Rolling your lips while sighing actually relaxes your facial muscles, that's why singers often warm up that way. This also gives credibility to my experience that the tongue NEEDS TO BE RELAXED to roll.


You should be able to make the roll without using voice when you get it right.


Other than that, I've got no better way to explain how to make the sound. It's really hard, but obviously people master it.

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Monday at 03:24 PM
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Hello Karen,


Thank you for feedback. We're really appreciated. Please feel free to let me know if you have questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a nice day.

Parisa Koknoi

Team ThaiPod101.com

Karen
Monday at 08:50 AM
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Good reminder and advice on the rolling ‘r’

ThaiPod101.com Verified
Saturday at 02:13 PM
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Hello กิมอันดริ,


Thank you for commnent. I'm not sure what you trying to say but I like the show. Please feel free to let me know if you have any questions. I will be glad to help.


Have a nice day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com