Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

(Absolute Beginner Season 2 , Lesson 10 - Where is Bangkok's National Museum?)
Pim: สวัสดีค่ะ (sà-wàt-dii khâ)
Ryan: Ryan here! Absolute Beginner Season 2 , Lesson 10 - Where is Bangkok's National Museum?
Pim: Hi, my name is Pim. พิมค่ะ (phim khâ)
Ryan: Hello, everyone and welcome back to ThaiPOD101.com
Pim: What are we learning today?
Ryan: In this lesson you'll will learn how to ask if something already happened yet in Thai.
Pim: This conversation takes place at a guesthouse in Bangkok.
Ryan: The conversation is between an American tourist, Dan, and the guesthouse staff.
Pim: The speakers aren't close with each other, therefore they will be speaking polite Thai.
Ryan: Let’s listen to the conversation.
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: สวัสดีค่ะคุณแดน (sà-wàt-dii khâ khun daaen.)
แดน: สวัสดีครับ (sà-wàt-dii khráp.)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: คุณแดนทานอาหารเช้าแล้วหรือยังคะ (khun daaen thaan aa-hǎan-cháao láaeo rǔue yang khá.)
แดน: ทานแล้วครับ (thaan láaeo khráp.)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: แล้ววันนี้คุณแดนมีแผนจะไปที่ไหนคะ (láaeo wan-níi khun daaen mii phǎaen jà bpai thîi nǎi khá.)
แดน: ผมไปพระบรมมหาราชวัง และวัดโพธิ์มาแล้วครับ มีอะไรที่อยู่ใกล้ ๆ และน่าดูอีกไหมครับ (phǒm bpai phrá-baaw-rom-má-hǎa-râat-chá-wang láe wát phoo maa láaeo khráp. mii à-rai thîi yùu glâi-glâi láe nâa-duu ìik mái khráp.)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์ : ไปพิพิธภัณฑ์สถานแห่งชาติมาแล้วหรือยังคะ (bpai phí-phít-thá-phan sà-thǎan hàeng châat maa láaeo rǔue yang khá.)
แดน: ยังครับ อยู่ที่ไหนเหรอครับ (yang khráp. yùu thîi-nǎi rǒoe khráp.)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: อยู่ใกล้ ๆ กับสนามหลวงค่ะ จากที่นี่เดินไปแค่ห้านาทีเท่านั้นค่ะ (yùu glâi-glâi gàp sà-nǎam lǔuang khâ. jàak thîi-nîi dooen bpai khâae hâa naa-thii thâo-nán khâ.)
แดน: ดีเลยครับ (dii looei khráp.)
English Host: Once again, slowly.
Thai Host: อีกครั้ง ช้า ๆ (ìik khráng cháa cháa)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: สวัสดีค่ะคุณแดน (sà-wàt-dii khâ khun daaen.)
แดน: สวัสดีครับ (sà-wàt-dii khráp.)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: คุณแดนทานอาหารเช้าแล้วหรือยังคะ (khun daaen thaan aa-hǎan-cháao láaeo rǔue yang khá.)
แดน: ทานแล้วครับ (thaan láaeo khráp.)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: แล้ววันนี้คุณแดนมีแผนจะไปที่ไหนคะ (láaeo wan-níi khun daaen mii phǎaen jà bpai thîi nǎi khá.)
แดน: ผมไปพระบรมมหาราชวัง และวัดโพธิ์มาแล้วครับ มีอะไรที่อยู่ใกล้ ๆ และน่าดูอีกไหมครับ (phǒm bpai phrá-baaw-rom-má-hǎa-râat-chá-wang láe wát phoo maa láaeo khráp. mii à-rai thîi yùu glâi-glâi láe nâa-duu ìik mái khráp.)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์ : ไปพิพิธภัณฑ์สถานแห่งชาติมาแล้วหรือยังคะ (bpai phí-phít-thá-phan sà-thǎan hàeng châat maa láaeo rǔue yang khá.)
แดน: ยังครับ อยู่ที่ไหนเหรอครับ (yang khráp. yùu thîi-nǎi rǒoe khráp.)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: อยู่ใกล้ ๆ กับสนามหลวงค่ะ จากที่นี่เดินไปแค่ห้านาทีเท่านั้นค่ะ (yùu glâi-glâi gàp sà-nǎam lǔuang khâ. jàak thîi-nîi dooen bpai khâae hâa naa-thii thâo-nán khâ.)
แดน: ดีเลยครับ (dii looei khráp.)
English Host: Once again, with the English.
Thai Host: อีกครั้ง พร้อมภาษาอังกฤษ (ìik khráng phráawm phaa-săa ang-grìt)
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: สวัสดีค่ะคุณแดน (sà-wàt-dii khâ khun daaen.)
Ryan: Good morning, Dan.
แดน: สวัสดีครับ (sà-wàt-dii khráp.)
Ryan: Good morning.
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: คุณแดนทานอาหารเช้าแล้วหรือยังคะ (khun daaen thaan aa-hǎan-cháao láaeo rǔue yang khá.)
Ryan: Have you eaten breakfast yet?
แดน: ทานแล้วครับ (thaan láaeo khráp.)
Ryan: I ate already.
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: แล้ววันนี้คุณแดนมีแผนจะไปที่ไหนคะ (láaeo wan-níi khun daaen mii phǎaen jà bpai thîi nǎi khá.)
Ryan: So, where do you plan to go today?
แดน: ผมไปพระบรมมหาราชวัง และวัดโพธิ์มาแล้วครับ มีอะไรที่อยู่ใกล้ ๆ และน่าดูอีกไหมครับ (phǒm bpai phrá-baaw-rom-má-hǎa-râat-chá-wang láe wát phoo maa láaeo khráp. mii à-rai thîi yùu glâi-glâi láe nâa-duu ìik mái khráp.)
Ryan: I went to the Grand Palace and Wat Pho already. Is there anything else that's nearby and worth seeing?
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์ : ไปพิพิธภัณฑ์สถานแห่งชาติมาแล้วหรือยังคะ (bpai phí-phít-thá-phan sà-thǎan hàeng châat maa láaeo rǔue yang khá.)
Ryan: Have you been to the National Museum yet?
แดน: ยังครับ อยู่ที่ไหนเหรอครับ (yang khráp. yùu thîi-nǎi rǒoe khráp.)
Ryan: Not yet. Where is it?
พนักงานเกสต์เฮ้าส์: อยู่ใกล้ ๆ กับสนามหลวงค่ะ จากที่นี่เดินไปแค่ห้านาทีเท่านั้นค่ะ (yùu glâi-glâi gàp sà-nǎam lǔuang khâ. jàak thîi-nîi dooen bpai khâae hâa naa-thii thâo-nán khâ.)
Ryan: It's right by Sanam Luang. From here it only takes five minutes walking.
แดน: ดีเลยครับ (dii looei khráp.)
Ryan: Great!
Ryan: So Khru Pim, in the conversation, Dan was told that the National Museum is right by Sanam Luang, right?
Pim: That’s right. สนาม (sà-nǎam) means “field” and หลวง lǔuang is an adjective that can mean “great” or “royal”.
Ryan: And so that’s the name of the big open field in the center of old Bangkok right next to the Grand Palace. But is it just because of its location that it’s called the “royal field”?
Pim: Actually, Sanam Luang is the place where some very important ceremonies are held. The most important of which are royal cremations.
Ryan: That’s interesting. But I didn’t see any crematorium the last time I was there.
Pim: That’s because they always put up a temporary building for the purpose whenever a royal funeral is held. The royal crematorium is supposed to represent Phra Meru, the giant mountain at the center of the world from Buddhist mythology. The Phra Meru built for the kings in old days were huge, up to 60 meters tall.
Ryan: Are there any other important ceremonies that go on at Sanam Luang?
Pim: Well, every year there is the Ploughing Ceremony at the start of the rice-planting season. Sacred oxen are used to plough a small patch of land that is planted with rice. Afterwards, the oxen are given a choice of foods to eat.Then a prediction is made about the growing season based on which foods they chose to eat.
Ryan: I see. So it really is a pretty important piece of land. OK, now let’s take a look at the vocabulary.
Ryan: The first word we shall see is:
Pim: ทาน (thaan) [natural native speed]
Ryan: to eat
Pim: ทาน (thaan) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ทาน (thaan) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: อาหารเช้า (aa-hǎan-cháao) [natural native speed]
Ryan: breakfast
Pim: อาหารเช้า (aa-hǎan-cháao) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: อาหารเช้า (aa-hǎan-cháao) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: แผน (phǎaen) [natural native speed]
Ryan: plan
Pim: แผน (phǎaen) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: แผน (phǎaen) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: ใกล้ ๆ (glâi-glâi) [natural native speed]
Ryan: nearby, around
Pim: ใกล้ ๆ (glâi-glâi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ใกล้ ๆ (glâi-glâi) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: น่าดู (nâa-duu) [natural native speed]
Ryan: worth seeing, watchable
Pim: น่าดู (nâa-duu) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: น่าดู (nâa-duu) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: อีก (ìik) [natural native speed]
Ryan: again, another
Pim: อีก (ìik) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: อีก (ìik) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: พิพิธภัณฑ์สถานแห่งชาติ (phí-phít-thá-phan sà-thǎan hàeng châat ) [natural native speed]
Ryan: the National Museum
Pim: พิพิธภัณฑ์สถานแห่งชาติ (phí-phít-thá-phan sà-thǎan hàeng châat ) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: พิพิธภัณฑ์สถานแห่งชาติ (phí-phít-thá-phan sà-thǎan hàeng châat ) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: สนามหลวง (sà-nǎam lǔuang) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Sanam Luang (the name of a large field in Bangkok)
Pim: สนามหลวง (sà-nǎam lǔuang) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: สนามหลวง (sà-nǎam lǔuang) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: ที่นี่ (thîi-nîi) [natural native speed]
Ryan: here
Pim: ที่นี่ (thîi-nîi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ที่นี่ (thîi-nîi) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: เดิน (dooen) [natural native speed]
Ryan: to walk
Pim: เดิน (dooen) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: เดิน (dooen) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Pim: The first phrase we’ll look at is....
Pim: แค่...เท่านั้น (khâae ... thâo-nán)
Ryan: Both parts of this expression can mean “only” or “just” when either is used alone. แค่ gets put before an amount of something, and เท่านั้น comes right after an amount of something.
Pim: Right. However it’s more natural to use both of them together in the sentence. So you’d have แค่ followed by some amount and then เท่านั้น (thâo-nán). Let’s just say for example that you only own six shirts.
Ryan: Wow, that’s not very many.
Pim: Yes, so we know “shirt” is เสื้อ (sûuea) and the classifier for shirts is ตัว (dtuua).
Ryan: So “six shirts” would be เสื้อหกตัว (sûuea hòk dtuua).
Pim: Right, but now we have to put แค่ right before the amount. So เสื้อแค่หกตัว (sûuea khâae hòk dtuua) gives us “only six shirts”. Now can you make the whole sentence “I have only six shirts”.
Ryan: ผมมีเสื้อแค่หกตัวเท่านั้น (phǒm mii sûuea khâae hòk dtuua thâo-nán.)
Pim: Perfect.
Ryan: What’s the next phrase?
Pim: อยู่ใกล้ ๆ กับ (yùu glâi-glâi gàp)
Ryan: This expression means “located nearby...” อยู่ (yùu) is the verb “to be located”. ใกล้ๆ (glâi-glâi) means “nearby” or “close to”. The name of the location that you’re using as a reference point will follow. So what was the example from the conversation?
Pim: อยู่ใกล้ ๆ กับสนามหลวง (yùu glâi-glâi gàp sà-nǎam lǔuang)
Ryan: “It’s right near Sanam Luang.” In this case the subject was not stated. But when one is given, it will come before the verb as usual.
Pim: That’s right. So for example, I could say บ้านของเราอยู่ใกล้ ๆ กับธนาคาร (bâan khǎawng rao yùu glâi-glâi gàp thá-naa-khaan.)
Ryan: “Our house is near the bank.” And what is the last phrase?
Pim: มีอะไร (mii à-rai)
Ryan: The verb มี (mii) usually means “to have”, but sometimes it takes on the duty of “to be” in order to say “there is” or “there are”. So in this usage, มีอะไร (mii à-rai) means “what is there” or “what are there”.
Pim: You’ll often hear this used in the expression มีอะไรบ้าง (mii a-rai bâang), which means “What all is there?” or “What do you all have?” This can be a very useful expression when you are at a shop or restaurant and want to hear a list of your possible choices.
Ryan: Can we hear that one more time?
Pim: มีอะไรบ้าง (mii a-rai bâang)
Ryan: Alright, now let’s move on to the grammar section.
Ryan: The focus of this lesson’s grammar is using แล้วหรือยัง (láaeo rǔue yang) to ask “did or not”.
Pim: We can ask if an action “already happened or not” by using the phrase แล้วหรือยัง (láaeo rǔue yang.)
Ryan: If we break it down by word, แล้ว (láaeo) means “already”, หรือ (rǔue) is the conjunction “or”, and ยัง (yang) means “still”. So that would give us “already or still”. That doesn’t make much sense. Can you help us out Khru Pim?
Pim: Sure. In questions, the meaning of ยัง (yang) is closer to “still not yet” rather than just “still”. So altogether, แล้วหรือยัง (láaeo rǔue yang), when placed after some statement means “did (something) happen already, or still not yet?”
Ryan: How about some examples to make it more clear.
Pim: OK. ทานข้าว (thaan khâao) is a polite way to say “eat a meal”. So I can ask...
คุณทานข้าวแล้วหรือยังคะ (khun thaan khâao láaeo rǔue yang khá.)
Ryan: “Have you eaten yet?” And this is actually a very common question in Thailand isn’t it?
Pim: Yes. “Have you eaten yet?” is a more common greeting phrase than “How are you?” But you’ll usually hear people using a more casual form of this phrase, such as...
กินข้าวรึยัง (gin khâao rúe yang)
Ryan: I see. So you’re using the more casual form of “to eat”, and the word แล้ว (láaeo) is just left out because it’s assumed. Can we hear both of those again? Listeners please repeat after Khru Pim. “Have you eaten yet?” (formally)
Pim: คุณทานข้าวแล้วหรือยังคะ (khun thaan khâao láaeo rǔue yang khá)
Ryan: (pause) and “Did you eat yet?” (casually)
Pim: กินข้าวรึยัง (gin khâao rúe yang)
Ryan: (pause) So now let’s look at how to answer this type of question. Obviously we could answer with an affirmative or negative. How about we start with the affirmative.
Pim: Well, basically you want to repeat the verb along with the word แล้ว (láaeo). The subject and object of the sentence are optional because they are usually known already from the question.
Ryan: Alright. So then for our example I could answer in the most basic way with ทานแล้ว (thaan láaeo) or ทานแล้วครับ (thaan láaeo khráp) to be more polite. And if I wanted to include the subject and object of the sentence I could say ผมทานข้าวแล้วครับ (phŏm thaan khâao láaeo khráp).
Pim: Yes, but I have to say the first version sounds far more natural.
Ryan: And what about if someone asked you the question in the very casual way using กินข้าวรึยัง (gin khâao rúe yang)?
Pim: In that case, if you are asked a question very casually, it is a signal that you can feel free to use more casual language in your response. So it would be OK to say กินแล้ว (gin láaeo) to a close friend or someone younger than you. But with others it would be good to still use the a polite ending and say กินแล้วครับ (gin láaeo khráp) if you are male, or กินแล้วค่ะ (gin láaeo khâ) if you are female.
Ryan: OK, I’ll keep that in mind. Now how about a negative answer?
Pim: When giving a negative answer to a แล้วหรือยัง (láaeo rǔue yang) question, you begin your answer with ยัง (yang). Then comes the negative statement ไม่ได้ (mâi dâai), which means “didn’t do”. And after this you repeat the verb.
Ryan: OK, I got it. So ยังไม่ได้ (yang mâi dâai) plus a verb means “Still did not do (that verb)”.
Pim: Exactly. So can you try giving a negative answer to our question about eating?
คุณทานข้าวแล้วหรือยังคะ (khun thaan khâao láaeo rǔue yang khá.)
Ryan: ยังไม่ได้ทานครับ (yang mâi dâai khráp) “No, I still haven’t eaten.” Is that right?
Pim: Yes it is. Very good. Now can you try the same thing with the more casual question? กินข้าวรึยัง (gin khâao rúe yang)
Ryan: ยังไม่ได้กิน (yang mâi dâai gin khâa)
Ryan: Ok, That’s all for this lesson.
Pim: มีคำถามอะไรไหมคะ (mii kham-thăam a-rai mái khá)
Ryan: Do you have any questions?
Pim: If you do, please let us know in the comment section. แล้วพบกันใหม่ค่ะ (láaeo phóp gan mài khâ)
Ryan: See you next time.

5 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.
Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters.

ThaiPod101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

A lot of Thai people like to eat ข้าวต้ม khâao-dtô m (rice soup) or โจ๊ก jóok (rice porridge) for breakfast. What about you? What do you like to eat for breakfast?

ThaiPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 1:28 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Michael,


Thank you very much for your comment and question. Yes, you understood correct. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to help. We wish you have a good progress in learning Thai.


Have a nice weekend.


Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Michael
Friday at 9:26 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Khru Parisa


Instead of "มีอะไรที่อยู่ใกล้ๆ และน่าดูอีกไหม", can you also say "ยังมีอะไรที่อยู่ใกล้ๆ และน่าดูไหม"


Thank you

Thaipod101.comVerified
Saturday at 11:10 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Mezzie,


Hope you doing well. For your question, แมซี่ชอบโจ๊กแต่มักจะกินแต่ไข่ is not quite right because the word มักจะ is use when you do something regularly, like your other example, " I usually have eggs for breakfast," in Thai is "แมซี่มักจะทานไข่เป็นอาหารเช้า". Hope that help. You're welcome for any future questions.


Have a good day.

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Mezzie (แมซี่่)
Tuesday at 10:44 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

แมซี่ชอบโจ็กแต่มักจะกินไข่


I just learned "มักจะ" last week, so hopefully I used it right. :) How would I add "for breakfast" to the sentence to say, "I usually have eggs for breakfast?"