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(Absolute Beginner Season 2 , Lesson 24 - Every Kind of Fruit is Delicious in Thailand)
Pim: สวัสดีค่ะ (sà-wàt-dii khâ)
Ryan: Ryan here! Absolute Beginner Season 2 , Lesson 24 - Every Kind of Fruit is Delicious in Thailand
Pim: Hi, my name is Pim, พิมค่ะ (phim khâ)
Ryan: Hello, everyone and welcome back to ThaiPOD101.com
Pim: What are we learning today?
Ryan: In this lesson you'll will learn how to use fruit vocabulary and classifiers for talking about fruit.
Pim: This conversation takes place at a fresh food market in Phuket.
Ryan: The conversation is between Dan and a fruit seller.
Pim: The speakers are strangers, therefore they will be speaking polite Thai.
Ryan: Let’s listen to the conversation.
คนขายผลไม้: มะม่วงอร่อย ๆ จ้ะ (má-mûuang à-ràuy à-ràuy jâ.)
แดน: สวัสดีครับ (sà-wàt-dii khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: สวัสดีจ้ะ เอาอะไรดีจ๊ะ มะม่วงหวานอร่อยนะจ๊ะ (sà-wàt-dii jâ ao à-rai dii já. má-mûuang wǎan à-ràuy ná já.)
แดน: มะม่วงกิโลละเท่าไหร่ครับ (má-mûuang gì-loo lá thâo-rài khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: กิโลละสามสิบห้าบาทจ้ะ (gì-loo lá sǎam-sìp-hâa bàat jâ.)
แดน: งั้นเอาสามลูกนี้ครับ (ngán ao sǎam lûuk níi khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: ห้าสิบบาทจ้ะ (hâa-sìp bàat jâ.)
แดน: แล้วมีอะไรอีกที่อร่อยครับ (láaeo mii à-rai ìik thîi à-ràuy khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: โอ้...ผลไม้ทุกอย่างอร่อยจ้ะ มีมะละกอ ฝรั่ง มังคุด แล้วก็กล้วยจ้ะ (ôo...phǒn-lá-máai thúk-yàang à-ràuy jâ. mii má-lá-gaaw fà-ràng mang-khút láaeo gâaw glûuai jâ.)
แดน: งั้นเอากล้วยหนึ่งหวีด้วยแล้วกันครับ (ngán ao glûuai nùeng wǐi dûuai láaeo gan khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: ทั้งหมดเจ็ดสิบห้าบาทจ้ะ (tháng-mòt jèt-sìp-hâa bàat jâ.)
แดน: นี่ครับ (nîi khráp)
คนขายผลไม้: ขอบคุณจ้ะ (khàawp-khun ja.)
English Host: Once again, slowly.
Thai Host: อีกครั้ง ช้า ๆ (ìik khráng cháa cháa)
คนขายผลไม้: มะม่วงอร่อย ๆ จ้ะ (má-mûuang à-ràuy à-ràuy jâ.)
แดน: สวัสดีครับ (sà-wàt-dii khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: สวัสดีจ้ะ เอาอะไรดีจ๊ะ มะม่วงหวานอร่อยนะจ๊ะ (sà-wàt-dii jâ ao à-rai dii já. má-mûuang wǎan à-ràuy ná já.)
แดน: มะม่วงกิโลละเท่าไหร่ครับ (má-mûuang gì-loo lá thâo-rài khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: กิโลละสามสิบห้าบาทจ้ะ (gì-loo lá sǎam-sìp-hâa bàat jâ.)
แดน: งั้นเอาสามลูกนี้ครับ (ngán ao sǎam lûuk níi khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: ห้าสิบบาทจ้ะ (hâa-sìp bàat jâ.)
แดน: แล้วมีอะไรอีกที่อร่อยครับ (láaeo mii à-rai ìik thîi à-ràuy khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: โอ้...ผลไม้ทุกอย่างอร่อยจ้ะ มีมะละกอ ฝรั่ง มังคุด แล้วก็กล้วยจ้ะ (ôo...phǒn-lá-máai thúk-yàang à-ràuy jâ. mii má-lá-gaaw fà-ràng mang-khút láaeo gâaw glûuai jâ.)
แดน: งั้นเอากล้วยหนึ่งหวีด้วยแล้วกันครับ (ngán ao glûuai nùeng wǐi dûuai láaeo gan khráp.)
คนขายผลไม้: ทั้งหมดเจ็ดสิบห้าบาทจ้ะ (tháng-mòt jèt-sìp-hâa bàat jâ.)
แดน: นี่ครับ (nîi khráp)
คนขายผลไม้: ขอบคุณจ้ะ (khàawp-khun ja.)
English Host: Once again, with the English.
Thai Host: อีกครั้ง พร้อมภาษาอังกฤษ (ìik khráng phráawm phaa-săa ang-grìt)
คนขายผลไม้: มะม่วงอร่อย ๆ จ้ะ (má-mûuang à-ràuy à-ràuy jâ.)
Ryan: Delicious mangoes!
แดน: สวัสดีครับ (sà-wàt-dii khráp.)
Ryan: Hello.
คนขายผลไม้: สวัสดีจ้ะ เอาอะไรดีจ๊ะ มะม่วงหวานอร่อยนะจ๊ะ (sà-wàt-dii jâ ao à-rai dii já. má-mûuang wǎan à-ràuy ná já.)
Ryan: Hello. What would you like? The mangoes are sweet and delicious.
แดน: มะม่วงกิโลละเท่าไหร่ครับ (má-mûuang gì-loo lá thâo-rài khráp.)
Ryan: How much per kilogram are mangoes?
คนขายผลไม้: กิโลละสามสิบห้าบาทจ้ะ (gì-loo lá sǎam-sìp-hâa bàat jâ.)
Ryan: They're thirty-five baht per kilogram.
แดน: งั้นเอาสามลูกนี้ครับ (ngán ao sǎam lûuk níi khráp.)
Ryan: Then I'll take these three mangoes.
คนขายผลไม้: ห้าสิบบาทจ้ะ (hâa-sìp bàat jâ.)
Ryan: That will be fifty baht.
แดน: แล้วมีอะไรอีกที่อร่อยครับ (láaeo mii à-rai ìik thîi à-ràuy khráp.)
Ryan: And what else do you have that tastes good?
คนขายผลไม้: โอ้...ผลไม้ทุกอย่างอร่อยจ้ะ มีมะละกอ ฝรั่ง มังคุด แล้วก็กล้วยจ้ะ (ôo...phǒn-lá-máai thúk-yàang à-ràuy jâ. mii má-lá-gaaw fà-ràng mang-khút láaeo gâaw glûuai jâ.)
Ryan: Oh...Every kind of fruit is delicious. I have papayas, guavas, mangosteens, and bananas.
แดน: งั้นเอากล้วยหนึ่งหวีด้วยแล้วกันครับ (ngán ao glûuai nùeng wǐi dûuai láaeo gan khráp.)
Ryan: Then I'll take one bunch of bananas too.
คนขายผลไม้: ทั้งหมดเจ็ดสิบห้าบาทจ้ะ (tháng-mòt jèt-sìp-hâa bàat jâ.)
Ryan: It's seventy-five baht in total.
แดน: นี่ครับ (nîi khráp)
Ryan: Here you are.
คนขายผลไม้: ขอบคุณจ้ะ (khàawp-khun ja.)
Ryan: Thank you.
Ryan: Hey Khru Pim, don’t you think fresh fruit is one of the best things about Thailand?
Pim: Yes. With our tropical climate there is always something good in season year round. It’s also a lot cheaper than buying fruit in many other countries.
Ryan: Not only that, but it’s more convenient, too.
Pim: Oh? How is it more convenient?
Ryan: Because you find carts selling fresh fruit that is already cut up and ready to eat. They also give you a strange, but really tasty powder mix that you can dip your fruit into.
Pim: Oh, you must mean พริกเกลือ (phrík gluuea). As you know, พริก(phrík) means “chili” and เกลือ (gluuea) means “salt”. So พริกเกลือ (phrík gluuea) is a mix of chili, salt, and also sugar. It goes really well with some of the tart fruits like guava and unripe mango.
Ryan: Yes, that’s exactly what I was talking about. It might sound strange at first to mix chili and salt with fruit, but once you try it you can’t stop eating.
Pim: I agree. How about we finish this lesson soon so I can go to the market and get some green mango.
Ryan: OK, in that case, let’s have a look at the vocabulary.
Ryan: The first word we shall see is:
Pim: มะม่วง (má-mûuang) [natural native speed]
Ryan: mango
Pim: มะม่วง (má-mûuang) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: มะม่วง (má-mûuang) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: หวาน (wǎan) [natural native speed]
Ryan: sweet
Pim: หวาน (wǎan) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: หวาน (wǎan) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: กิโล (gì-loo) [natural native speed]
Ryan: kilogram
Pim: กิโล (gì-loo) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: กิโล (gì-loo) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: ลูก (lûuk) [natural native speed]
Ryan: counter for fruits, balls, round things
Pim: ลูก (lûuk) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ลูก (lûuk) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: มะละกอ (má-lá-gaaw) [natural native speed]
Ryan: papaya
Pim: มะละกอ (má-lá-gaaw) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: มะละกอ (má-lá-gaaw) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: ฝรั่ง (fà-ràng) [natural native speed]
Ryan: guava
Pim: ฝรั่ง (fà-ràng) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ฝรั่ง (fà-ràng) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: มังคุด (mang-khút) [natural native speed]
Ryan: mangosteen
Pim: มังคุด (mang-khút) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: มังคุด (mang-khút) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: กล้วย (glûuai) [natural native speed]
Ryan: banana
Pim: กล้วย (glûuai) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: กล้วย (glûuai) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: หวี (wǐi) [natural native speed]
Ryan: bunch (of bananas)
Pim: หวี (wǐi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: หวี (wǐi) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase we’ll look at is....
Pim: ทุกอย่าง (thúk-yàang)
Ryan: This means “everything”. It can be used to refer to both objects and actions. How about an example with objects?
Pim: ฉันอยากกินทุกอย่าง (chăn yàak gin thúk-yàang)
Ryan: “I want to eat everything.” So in this sentence, the “everything” meant by ทุกอย่าง (thúk-yàang) is all the food. For an example where ทุกอย่าง (thúk-yàang) refers to actions, I could say...
ผมจะทำเองทุกอย่าง (phŏm jà tham eeng thúk-yàang) “I will do everything by myself.”
Pim: Good example. In that sentence (ทุกอย่าง) meant all the actions.
Ryan: The next phrase is...
Pim: ทั้งหมด (tháng-mòt)
Ryan: This means “all” or “altogether”. It can be used when stating a total amount of something or when referring to all the items in a group.
Pim: For an example of an amount, I could say...
เราจะพักที่นี่ทั้งหมดสิบเจ็ดวัน (rao jà phák thîi-nîi tháng-mòt sìp jèt wan)
Ryan: “We’ll stay here for a total of seventeen days.” The key part of the sentence here was ทั้งหมดสิบเจ็ดวัน (tháng-mòt sìp jèt wan), which meant “in total seventeen days”.
Pim: And now for an example where ทั้งหมด (tháng-mòt) means all the items of a group I could say...
นี่ เอาเงินทั้งหมดไปเลย (nîi ao ngoen tháng-mòt bpai looei)
Ryan: “Here, just take all of the money.” A key part of this sentence was เงินทั้งหมด (ngoen tháng-mòt), which meant “all of the money”. And now the last words we will cover are...
Pim: จ้ะ (jâ) and จ๊ะ (já)
Ryan: These are polite ending particles that are used exactly like ค่ะ (khâ) and คะ (khá).
Pim: Yes, that’s right. จ้ะ (jâ), with a falling tone, is used at the end of statements. And จ๊ะ (já), with a high tone, is used at the end of questions. These are more informal and friendly than ค่ะ (khâ) and คะ (khá).
Ryan: And isn’t it true that they can be spoken by both men and women, but are more commonly used by women.
Pim: Yes, that’s correct. From the conversation, we had these examples...
สวัสดีจ้ะ (sà-wàt-dii jâ)
Ryan: “Hello.”
Pim: เอาอะไรดีจ๊ะ (ao a-rai dii já)
Ryan: “What would you like?” OK, now let’s move on to the grammar section.
Ryan: The focus of this lesson’s grammar is fruit vocabulary and classifiers for talking about fruit.
Pim: The general word for “fruit” is ผลไม้ (phǒn-lá-máai). And there are two classifiers that can be used for most fruits. They are ผล (phǒn) and ลูก (lûuk).
Ryan: But of these two, ลูก (lûuk) is less formal and used much more often in regular speech.
Pim: That’s true. You can use ลูก (lûuk) as a classifier with any type of fruit. Just say the name of the fruit, then the number, and finally ลูก (lûuk) at the end. For example...
เมื่อวานนี้ดิฉันซื้อมะม่วงสามลูก (mûuea-waan níi dì-chăn súue má-mûuang săam lûuk)
Ryan: “I bought three mangos yesterday.” So here, the key part of the sentence was มะม่วงสามลูก (má-mûuang săam lûuk), which is like saying “mangos three fruits”. What if you had five mangos instead?
Pim: Oh, that’s easy. You keep มะม่วง (má-mûuang) for “mango” and the classifier ลูก the same, and you just change the number in the middle. So “five mangos” would be มะม่วงห้าลูก (má-mûuang hâa lûuk).
Ryan: Now, when you buy fresh fruit at the market it’s usually sold by weight not by item. So in that case, the unit of weight becomes the classifier. And the most common unit used in Thailand is the kilogram.
Pim: The Thai way to say “kilogram” is กิโลกรัม (gì-loo-gram), and it’s often abbreviated as กิโล (gì-loo). So to ask how much some fruit costs per kilogram you’d say the name of the fruit followed by กิโลละเท่าไหร่ (gì-loo lá thâo-rài).
Ryan: In this question, กิโลละ (gì-loo lá) means “per kilo” and เท่าไหร่ (thâo-rài) means “how much?”
Pim: Yes. For example, I could ask the fruit seller, ฝรั่งกิโลละเท่าไหร่คะ (fà-ràng gì-loo lá thâo-rài khá)
Ryan: “How much per kilogram are guavas?”
Pim: Now, how about you pretend that I’m the fruit seller. Can you ask me the price of mangos?
Ryan: Alright, we just the word for “mango” before, which was มะม่วง (má-mûuang). So I’d say...
มะม่วงกิโลละเท่าไหร่ครับ (má-mûuang gì-loo lá thâo-rài khráp).
Pim: Perfect! You know, Thailand has many more kinds of fruit besides mangoes and guavas. I think it’s a good idea if we go over some of the other ones.
Ryan: Sounds good. You might notice that a lot of the names of different fruits begin with the syllable มะ má. It comes from a word in the original Thai dialect that meant any round shaped produce.
Pim: Well, we already had มะม่วง (má-mûuang) for “mango”. Another one is มะพร้าว (má-phráao)
Ryan: “coconut”
Pim: There is also มะนาว (má-naao)
Ryan: “lime”
Pim: One more is มะละกอ (má-lá-gaaw)
Ryan: “papaya”. How about all four of those again. Listeners, please repeat after Khru Pim. First “mango”
Pim: มะม่วง (má-mûuang)
Ryan: (pause) now “coconut”
Pim: มะพร้าว (má-phráao)
Ryan: (pause) next “lime”
Pim: มะนาว (má-naao)
Ryan: (pause) and finally “papaya”
Pim: มะละกอ (má-lá-gaaw)
Ryan: (pause) OK. Now let’s have some fruits with different sounding names.
Pim: Alright. Many people enjoy สับปะรด (sàp-bpà-rót)
Ryan: “pineapple”
Pim: And in Thailand we have a wide variety of กล้วย (glûuai)
Ryan: “bananas”. It’s true you do see a large variety of bananas in Thailand. I heard there is one type of very small bananas called “fingernail bananas”.
Pim: Oh, yes. You mean กล้วยเล็บมือนาง (glûuai lép muue naang), which means “lady’s fingernails bananas”. Now we can’t end a lesson about fruit without mentioning the king of fruit.
Ryan: The king of fruit? Uh-oh, you don’t mean...
Pim: Yes, the king of fruit is ทุเรียน (thú-riian).
Ryan: Well, durian sure wins the prize for stinkiest fruit. But the real king of fruit in my opinion will always be มะม่วง (má-mûuang)
Ryan: Ok, That’s all for this lesson.
Pim: แล้วพบกันใหม่ค่ะ (láaeo phóp gan mài khâ)
Ryan: See you next time.

3 Comments

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ThaiPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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What is your favorite Thai fruit?

ThaiPod101.comVerified
Tuesday at 7:19 pm
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Hello Rbrownle,


Thank you very much for your comment. We are really appreciated. Also, thank you very much for an error notice we will try to fix it. Please let us know if you have any future questions.


Have a good day.


Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

rbrownle
Saturday at 4:19 pm
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Hi, thanks for enjoyable lessons.

Think there's a small spelling error in the example sentence for mangosteen.

Thai word for "rind" should be เปลือก, not เปลือง ("to waste").

Richard