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(Absolute Beginner Season 2 , Lesson 5 - Getting Your Photo Taken in Thailand)
Pim: สวัสดีค่ะ (sà-wàt-dii khâ)
Ryan: Ryan here! Absolute Beginner Season 2 , Lesson 5 - Getting Your Photo Taken in Thailand
Pim: Hi, my name is Pim, พิมค่ะ (phim khâ), and I am joined here by Ryan.
Ryan: Hello, everyone and welcome back to ThaiPOD101.com
Pim: What are we learning today?
Ryan: In this lesson you'll will learn about two different uses of the Thai word ให้ (hâi).
Pim: This conversation takes place at Wat Pho, a famous temple in Bangkok.
Ryan: The conversation is between an American tourist, Dan, and a Thai temple visitor, Gwang.
Pim: The speakers are strangers, therefore they will be speaking polite Thai.
Ryan: Let’s listen to the conversation.
แดน: ขอโทษนะครับ ช่วยถ่ายรูปให้ผมหน่อยได้ไหมครับ (khǎaw-thôot ná khráp. chûuai thàai rûup hâi phǒm nàuy dâai mǎi khráp.)
กวาง: อ้อ ได้เลยค่ะ หนึ่ง สอง สาม (แชะ) (âaw...dâai looei khâ. nùeng...sǎawng...sǎam (shutter click))
แดน: ขอบคุณมากครับ (khàawp-khun mâak khráp.)
กวาง: ไม่เป็นไรค่ะ คุณพูดภาษาไทยเก่งมากเลย ขอโทษนะคะ คุณเป็นคนประเทศอะไรเหรอคะ (mâi bpen-rai khâ. khun phûut phaa-sǎa-thai gèng mâak looei. khǎaw-thôot ná khá. khun bpen khon phrá-thêet à-rai rǒoe khá.)
แดน: ผมเป็นคนอเมริกัน ชื่อแดนครับ แล้วคุณชื่ออะไรครับ (phǒm bpen khon-à-mee-rí-gan. chûue daaen khráp. láaeo khun chûue à-rai khráp.)
กวาง: ชื่อกวางค่ะ ยินดีที่ได้รู้จักค่ะ (chûue gwaang khâ. yin-dii thîi dâai rúu-jàk khâ.)
แดน: เช่นกันครับ (chên gan khrap.)
กวาง: กล้องของคุณแดนสวยจังเลยค่ะ (glâwng khǎawng khun sǔuai jang looei khâ.)
แดน: ขอบคุณมากครับ กล้องตัวนี้คุณพ่อของผมให้เป็นของขวัญวันเกิดครับ (khàawp-khun mâak khráp. glâwng dtuua níi khun-phâaw khǎawng phǒm hâi bpen khǎawng-khwǎn wan-gòoet khráp.)
English Host: Once again, slowly.
Thai Host: อีกครั้ง ช้า ๆ (ìik khráng cháa cháa)
แดน: ขอโทษนะครับ ช่วยถ่ายรูปให้ผมหน่อยได้ไหมครับ (khǎaw-thôot ná khráp. chûuai thàai rûup hâi phǒm nàuy dâai mǎi khráp.)
กวาง: อ้อ ได้เลยค่ะ หนึ่ง สอง สาม (âaw...dâai looei khâ. nùeng...sǎawng...sǎam)
แดน: ขอบคุณมากครับ (khàawp-khun mâak khráp.)
กวาง: ไม่เป็นไรค่ะ คุณพูดภาษาไทยเก่งมากเลย ขอโทษนะคะ คุณเป็นคนประเทศอะไรเหรอคะ (mâi bpen-rai khâ. khun phûut phaa-sǎa-thai gèng mâak looei. khǎaw-thôot ná khá. khun bpen khon phrá-thêet à-rai rǒoe khá.)
แดน: ผมเป็นคนอเมริกัน ชื่อแดนครับ แล้วคุณชื่ออะไรครับ (phǒm bpen khon-à-mee-rí-gan. chûue daaen khráp. láaeo khun chûue à-rai khráp.)
กวาง: ชื่อกวางค่ะ ยินดีที่ได้รู้จักค่ะ (chûue gwaang khâ. yin-dii thîi dâai rúu-jàk khâ.)
แดน: เช่นกันครับ (chên gan khrap.)
กวาง: กล้องของคุณแดนสวยจังเลยค่ะ (glâwng khǎawng khun sǔuai jang looei khâ.)
แดน: ขอบคุณมากครับ กล้องตัวนี้คุณพ่อของผมให้เป็นของขวัญวันเกิดครับ (khàawp-khun mâak khráp. glâwng dtuua níi khun-phâaw khǎawng phǒm hâi bpen khǎawng-khwǎn wan-gòoet khráp.)
English Host: Once again, with the English.
Thai Host: อีกครั้ง พร้อมภาษาอังกฤษ (ìik khráng phráawm phaa-săa ang-grìt)
แดน: ขอโทษนะครับ ช่วยถ่ายรูปให้ผมหน่อยได้ไหมครับ(khǎaw-thôot ná khráp. chûuai thàai rûup hâi phǒm nàuy dâai mǎi khráp.)
Ryan: Excuse me. Could you please take my photo?
กวาง: อ้อ ได้เลยค่ะ (âaw...dâai looei khâ.)
Ryan: Oh...sure.
กวาง: หนึ่ง สอง สาม (แชะ) (nùeng...sǎawng...sǎam)
Ryan: One...two...three! (shutter click)
แดน: ขอบคุณมากครับ (khàawp-khun mâak khráp.)
Ryan: Thank you very much.
กวาง: ไม่เป็นไรค่ะ (mâi bpen-rai khâ.)
Ryan: No problem.
กวาง: คุณพูดภาษาไทยเก่งมากเลย (khun phûut phaa-sǎa-thai gèng mâak looei.)
Ryan: You speak Thai very well.
กวาง: ขอโทษนะคะ คุณเป็นคนประเทศอะไรเหรอคะ (khǎaw-thôot ná khá. khun bpen khon phrá-thêet à-rai rǒoe khá.)
Ryan: Excuse me, what country are you from?
แดน: ผมเป็นคนอเมริกัน ชื่อแดนครับ (phǒm bpen khon-à-mee-rí-gan. chûue daaen khráp.)
Ryan: I'm American. My name is Dan.
แดน: แล้วคุณชื่ออะไรครับ (láaeo khun chûue à-rai khráp.)
Ryan: And what's your name?
กวาง: ชื่อกวางค่ะ ยินดีที่ได้รู้จักค่ะ (chûue gwaang khâ. yin-dii thîi dâai rúu-jàk khâ.)
Ryan: My name is Gwang. Nice to meet you.
แดน: เช่นกันครับ (chên gan khrap.)
Ryan: Nice to meet you too.
กวาง: กล้องของคุณแดนสวยจังเลยค่ะ (glâwng khǎawng khun sǔuai jang looei khâ.)
Ryan: Your camera is really nice looking.
แดน: ขอบคุณมากครับ (khàawp-khun mâak khráp. )
Ryan: Thanks a lot.
แดน: กล้องตัวนี้คุณพ่อของผมให้เป็นของขวัญวันเกิดครับ (glâwng dtuua níi khun-phâaw khǎawng phǒm hâi bpen khǎawng-khwǎn wan-gòoet khráp.)
Ryan: My father gave me this camera as a birthday present.
Ryan: So Khru Phim, in this conversation Dan asked Gwang to take a photo for him at a temple. But is it really OK to be taking pictures at temples?
Pim: Of course it is. Thai people do it all the time. You know, this might surprise you, but foreigners aren’t the only tourists in Thailand. There’s a lot of internal tourism of Thais from one city going to visit other cities. And famous temples are some of the most popular destinations. We go to pray and make offerings, of course, but while we’re there we like to take some photos, too.
Ryan: I see. So it’s fine to take photos anywhere in a temple then?
Pim: It’s fine to take pictures anywhere outside in a temple. But sometimes you aren’t allowed to take them inside the buildings. But don’t worry, because there will be signs in the places where it isn’t allowed.
Ryan: Alright. Anything else we should know?
Pim: Well, it’s good to remember that temples are places of worship so dressing conservatively is an important part of showing respect.
Ryan: That sounds fair enough. So what is considered dressing respectfully in Thailand?
Pim: Basically, wearing shorts or skirts that stop above the knees is considered showing too much skin. Also, sleeveless shirts for both men and women should be avoided. But for women it is OK if you just carry a light shawl in your handbag to cover your shoulders before you enter.
Ryan: And of course you always need to take off your shoes before entering a temple building.
Pim: That’s right. And finally, make sure you don’t sit with your feet pointing out in front of you at a Buddha image. It’s considered a big insult because we think of feet as dirty and lowly.
Ryan: Right, but if you make a little mistake don’t worry about it too much. Thais are very forgiving. It’s your attitude that is the most important. OK, now let’s take a look at the vocabulary.
Ryan: The first word we shall see is:
Pim: ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Excuse me, sorry
Pim: ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: ช่วย (chûuai) [natural native speed]
Ryan: to help
Pim: ช่วย (chûuai) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ช่วย (chûuai) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: ถ่ายรูป (thàai-rûup) [natural native speed]
Ryan: to take a picture
Pim: ถ่ายรูป (thàai-rûup) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ถ่ายรูป (thàai-rûup) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: เก่ง (gèng) [natural native speed]
Ryan: clever, skillful
Pim: เก่ง (gèng) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: เก่ง (gèng) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: ประเทศ (phrá-thêet, bprà-thêet) [natural native speed]
Ryan: country, nation
Pim: ประเทศ (phrá-thêet, bprà-thêet)[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ประเทศ (phrá-thêet, bprà-thêet) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: กล้อง (glâwng) [natural native speed]
Ryan: camera
Pim: กล้อง (glâwng) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: กล้อง (glâwng) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: สวย (sǔuai, sǔuay) [natural native speed]
Ryan: beautiful
Pim: สวย (sǔuai, sǔuay) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: สวย (sǔuai, sǔuay) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: คุณพ่อ (khun phâaw)[natural native speed]
Ryan: father
Pim: คุณพ่อ (khun phâaw) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: คุณพ่อ (khun phâaw)[natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: ของขวัญ (khǎawng-khwǎn) [natural native speed]
Ryan: gift
Pim: ของขวัญ (khǎawng-khwǎn) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: ของขวัญ (khǎawng-khwǎn) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Pim: วันเกิด (wan-gòoet) [natural native speed]
Ryan: birthday
Pim: วันเกิด (wan-gòoet) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Pim: วันเกิด (wan-gòoet) [natural native speed]
Ryan: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Pim: The first phrase we’ll look at is....
Pim: ช่วย...ให้หน่อย (chûuai ... hâi nàuy)
Ryan: This phrase essentially means “please do (some action) for me”. The first word, ช่วย (chûuai), is the verb “to help”. This is followed by whatever you are requesting the listener to do. That is followed by ให้หน่อย (hâi nàuy). ให้ (hâi) in this case means “for”, as in “for me”. And หน่อย (nàuy) means “a little”.
Pim: We put หน่อย (nàuy) there to make the request sound more humble.
Ryan: So the whole thing is almost like saying “Could you help a little by doing (some request) for me?”
Pim: Right. I’ll give you an example of a whole sentence...
ช่วยเปิดประตูให้หน่อย (chûuai bpòoet bprà-dtuu hâi nàuy.)
Ryan: “Could you please open the door for me?” The requested action, เปิดประตู (bpòoet bprà-dtuu), or “open the door” is put between ช่วย (chûuai) and ให้หน่อย (hâi nàuy). Can we hear it once again?
Pim: ช่วยเปิดประตูให้หน่อย (chûuai bpòoet bprà-dtuu hâi nàuy)
Ryan: The next phrase is one that everyone needs to know...
Pim: ไม่เป็นไร (mâi bpen-rai)
Ryan: What a useful phrase. It can mean “Never mind”, “It’s alright”, “It’s nothing”, “That’s OK”, “No problem”, “Don’t worry”, or “You’re welcome”.
Pim: Yes. Thai people like to say ไม่เป็นไร (mâi bpen-rai) all the time.
Ryan: And the next phrase is...
Pim: จังเลย (jang looei)
Ryan: This functions as an adverb meaning “exceptionally”, “exceedingly”, “extremely”, “very” or “really”. It will usually follow directly after an adjective. As in...
Pim: อากาศวันนี้ร้อนจังเลย (aa-gàat wan-níi ráawn jang looei.)
Ryan: “The weather is really hot today.” And last, we’ll look at a word...
Pim: เหรอ (rǒoe)
Ryan: This is a word that can be put at the end of a sentence to turn it into a question.
It’s like saying “Really?” or “Is that so?” เหรอ can be used when you want a confirmation, or it can be used in a rhetorical sense. How about an example...
Pim: คุณมีแฟนแล้วเหรอ (khun mii faaen láaeo rǒoe.)
Ryan: “So you have a girlfriend already, huh?”
Pim: เหรอ (rǒoe) is also combined with จริง (jing) very often to make จริงเหรอ (jing rǒoe)
Ryan: “Is that really true?”
Pim: But sometimes when we use เหรอ rǒoe it doesn’t mean “really?”. Sometimes it is just added to a question to make it sound more smooth. You can tell that it’s being used for this purpose if there is another question word in the sentence. Such as…
คุณเป็นคนประเทศอะไรเหรอคะ (khun bpen khon prá-thêet à-rai rǒoe khá.)
Ryan: “So, what’s your nationality?” The basic question is already asked with คุณเป็นคนประเทศอะไร (khun bpen khon prá-thêet à-rai), but adding เหรอ (rǒoe) along with the polite particle คะ (khá) or ครับ (khráp) will make the question sound less demanding.
Pim: Exactly.
Ryan: Alright, now let’s have a look at the grammar.
Ryan: The focus of this lesson’s grammar is using ให้ (hâi) to mean “to give”, or to mean “for”
Pim: ให้ (hâi) is one of the most common words in the Thai language. It can be used in many different senses. Two of it’s main functions are as the verb “to give” and as a preposition meaning “for”.
Ryan: First, let’s look at using ให้ (hâi) as the verb “to give”. The basic pattern is Subject + ให้ (hâi) + Direct Object + Indirect Object. For example...
Pim: คุณแม่ให้เงินคุณพ่อ (khun-mâae hâi ngoen khun-phâaw.)
Ryan: “Mother gave the money to father.” Let’s break that down a little.
Pim: คุณแม่ให้เงิน (khun-mâae hâi ngoen) means “Mother gives money”. Then คุณพ่อ (khun-phâaw) comes at the end. “Father” is who the money was given to.
Ryan: Can we hear the whole thing together once more?
Pim: คุณแม่ให้เงินคุณพ่อ (khun-mâae hâi ngoen khun-phâaw.) We can also include the word กับ gàp between the direct object and the indirect object. In this case, the sentence would become คุณแม่ให้เงินกับคุณพ่อ (khun-mâae hâi ngoen gàp khun-phâaw.) Now can you try to make a sentence? How would you say “I gave the money to mother.”
Ryan: Let’s see. Would it be...ผมให้เงินกับคุณแม่ (phŏm hâi ngoen gàp khun-mâae)
Pim: That’s right. And remember our female listeners would have to use the feminine pronoun, so they’d say ดิฉันให้เงินกับคุณแม่ (dì-chăn hâi ngoen gàp khun-mâae)
Ryan: OK, now let’s look at the second meaning of ให้ (hâi) that we want to cover.
Pim: Sure. ให้ (hâi) can be used as a preposition “for”, in the sense of “doing something for somebody”. In this usage, ให้ (hâi) will follow a verb or a verb and it’s direct object. This is followed by who or what the action was done for.
Ryan: Let’s use “Father opened the bottle for me.” as an example.
Pim: OK. เปิด (bpooèt) is “to open” and ขวด (khùuat) is “bottle.” So คุณพ่อเปิดขวด (khun-phâaw bpooèt khùuat) means...
Ryan: “Father opens the bottle”.
Pim: Then ให้ดิฉัน (hâi dì-chăn) will mean...
Ryan: “for me”. So the whole thing together is...
Pim: คุณพ่อเปิดขวดให้ดิฉัน (khun-phâaw bpooèt khùuat hâi dì-chăn)
Ryan: Now in this case ดิฉัน (dì-chăn) meaning “me” follows directly after ให้ (hâi) to show who received the benefit of the action. But in a regular conversation between two people, it’s often obvious from the context that the object of the preposition “for” is either “you” or “me”. In these cases it will be omitted.
Pim: That’s right. For example ซื้อขนม (súue khà-nŏm) means “to buy candy”. So if I see a little kid with some candy i could ask ใครซื้อขนมให้ (khrai súue khà-nǒm hâi.)
Ryan: “Who bought candy for you?”
Pim: Another thing we can do is we can attach a complete clause after ให้ (hâi) instead of just a noun. In this way, ให้ (hâi) carries the meaning of “for the purpose of”. For example...ดิฉันซื้อหนังสือพิมพ์ (dì-chăn súue năng-suǔe phim) means...
Ryan: “I buy a newspaper.”
Pim: Right. And ให้คุณพ่อ (hâi khun-phâaw) means “for father”, but ให้คุณพ่ออ่าน (hâi khun-phâaw àan) means...
Ryan: “for father to read”
Pim: Exactly. So we can compare both full sentences. First... ดิฉันซื้อหนังสือพิมพ์ให้คุณพ่อ (dì-chăn súue năng-suǔe phim hâi khun-phâaw)
Ryan: “I bought a newspaper for father.”
Pim: But... ดิฉันซื้อหนังสือพิมพ์ให้คุณพ่ออ่าน (dì-chăn súue năng-suǔe phim hâi khun-phâaw àan)
Ryan: “I bought a newspaper for father to read.”
Ryan: Ok, That’s all for this lesson.
Pim: มีคำถามอะไรไหมคะ (mii kham-thăam a-rai mái khá)
Ryan: Do you have any questions?
Pim: If you do, please ask us in the comment section. แล้วพบกันใหม่ค่ะ (láaeo phóp gan mài khâ)
Ryan: See you next time.

13 Comments

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ThaiPod101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Hi listeners, have you ever been to a temple in Thailand?  How do you like it?

ThaiPod101.comVerified
Friday at 11:38 am
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Hello Dan,


Thank you very much for your comment. For your question, the word เงิน "ngooen" is from the vowel เออ that change it form when it is in the medial position. Here are some example,

final position medial position

เงอ เงิน

เบอ เบิก

เจอ เจิน

เกอ เกิน

Hope that helps. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to helps.


Have a nice day.


Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

ThaiPod101.comVerified
Friday at 11:30 am
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Hello Joane,


Thank you very much for your comment. For your question, What the function of ” เป็น” (bpen) is in this sentence?

khun-phâaw khǎawng phǒm hâi bpen khǎawng-khwǎn wan-gòoet khráp.

พ่อของผมให้เป็นของขวัญวันเกิดครับ

Let me explain, ” เป็น” (bpen) is one of the verb "to be" in Thai and ” เป็น” (bpen) is use as a function of "to be something" in that sentence. Here are some more example using ” เป็น” (bpen) "to be something"

I am a doctor. "phom bpen maaw", He is my father. " khao bpen phaaw phom"

Hope you understand. Please let me know if you have any future questions. I will be glad to helps.


Have a nice day.


Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Dan
Sunday at 8:24 pm
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Hello, I have a question!


In this lesson you introduce the word for money. "Ngun". I have found it within your lesson PDF in this sentence:


ผมใหเงินกับคุณแม and I've identified that this word is the word ngun: เงิน


My problem is that every sheet of vowels I can find does not contain this vowel!! I have learned to read most of the vowel sounds but I do not recognise this one at all: เอิ


Can you help?

Thanks, Dan

joanne
Tuesday at 8:05 pm
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khun-phâaw khǎawng phǒm hâi bpen khǎawng-khwǎn wan-gòoet khráp.

พ่อของผมให้เป็นของขวัญวันเกิดครับ


Hello Parisa,


Can you explain what the function of " เป็น" (bpen) is in this sentence?



Thank you,

joanne

ThaiPod101.comVerified
Saturday at 10:16 am
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Hello Todd,


Thank you very much for your comment. Normally when questions end with “บ้าง” means you can answer more than one thing or one answer. For example: วันนี้คุณกินอะไรบ้าง You can answer with 10 different dishes that you ate today. Hope that help.


Have a good day.


Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Todd Schafer
Monday at 9:45 am
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Thanks, Parisa, I figure it must be something like that. It couldn't be "some dog",,,hehe.:smile:

http://www.thaipod101.com/
Tuesday at 12:17 pm
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Hello Todd,


Thanks again for your comment. For your question, "บ้าง" means "some" but in this sentence คุณเห็นสุนัขของฉันบ้างไหมคะ "บ้าง" doesn't have any meaning but it just the way we say thing in Thai. Sometime you just have to remember how we say thing. They is not always a rule to follow. Please let us know if you have any future questions.


Have a nice day.


Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Todd Schafer
Sunday at 6:53 am
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Been to a temple in ChiangMai. In the sentence คุณเห็นสุนัขของฉันบ้างไหมคะ, which means "Have you seen my dog"? i'm not sure what the บ้าง is doing there which means "some".

Thaipod101.comVerified
Friday at 10:56 pm
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Hi Mezzie,

You almost correct. There are just two lettle mistake in the sentence, first the word ที่ means "at" so you don't need to use it when you go to somewhere and you need "ๆ" to repeat the word "อื่น" like this:

แมซี่เคยไปที่วัดโพธึ์และวัดอื่นๆหลายแห่งค่ะ


Hope that help and have a good day ka. :)

Parisa

Team ThaiPod101.com

Mezzie (แมซี่)
Wednesday at 4:16 am
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แมซี่เคยไปที่วัดโพธึ์และวัดอื่นหลายแห่งค่ะ


Hmm... I'm trying to say, "I've been to Wat Pho and a bunch of other temples." Am I close?