Get up to 45% Off All 6-month Plans. Hurry! Ends soon!
Get up to 45% Off All 6-month Plans. Hurry! Ends soon!
ThaiPod101.com Blog
Learn Thai with Free Daily
Audio and Video Lessons!
Start Your Free Trial 6 FREE Features

A List of Intermediate Thai Phrases You Need to Know

Thumbnail

Are you ready for another shortcut in your Thai learning? 

If you’re getting ready to approach an intermediate level of proficiency in Thai, you’ll find this article very useful. We have compiled a list of intermediate Thai phrases for you, so you won’t have to learn tons of individual words or worry about composing more complex sentences all by yourself. 

At the intermediate level, you should be able to communicate in a variety of everyday situations. We have categorized all of the phrases on our according to the situation, so by the time you’re done reading, you’ll be prepared for: 

  • Talking about past events
  • Making and changing plans
  • Explaining and giving reasons
  • Giving reactions during everyday conversations
  • Using etiquette phrases in social and business settings

Let’s begin.

A Woman Smiling while She Reads a Book on the Bus

These intermediate Thai phrases will definitely come in handy.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. How to Talk About Past Events in Thai
  2. How to Make and Change Plans in Thai
  3. How to Explain and Give Reasons in Thai
  4. How to React in Daily Thai Conversations
  5. How to Use Etiquette Phrases in Thai
  6. Conclusion

1. How to Talk About Past Events in Thai

The first few intermediate Thai phrases we’ll cover today are those for talking about the past. As you should already know, there is no verb conjugation in Thai. This means all you have to do is remember the structures and sentence patterns provided below! 

1 – [Someone] used to do [something].

  • Sentence structure: subject + เคย + verb + object (if any)
  • Pronunciation: subject + khooei + verb + object (if any)

You can use this intermediate Thai phrase to explain that someone used to do a certain action in the past.

Example 1:
ผมเคยออกกำลังกายทุกวัน แต่ตอนนี้ผมไม่มีเวลา
phǒm-khooei-àawk-gam-lang-gaai-thúk-wan dtàae-dtaawn-níi-phǒm-mâi-mii-wee-laa
I used to exercise every day, but now I don’t have time.

An Older Man Playing Tennis

I used to exercise every day.

Example 2:
ตอนเด็ก ๆ แม่เคยไปโรงเรียนโดยรถเมล์
dtaawn-dèk-dèk mâae-khooei-bpai-roong-riian-dooi-rót-mee
Mom used to go to school by bus when she was young.

2 – [Someone] has never done [something].

  • Sentence structure: subject + ไม่เคย + verb + object (if any)
  • Pronunciation: subject + mâi-khooei + verb + object (if any)

This intermediate-level Thai phrase, on the other hand, is used to explain that someone has never done something before. 

Example 1:
ผมไม่เคยไปประเทศอังกฤษ
phǒm-mâi-khooei-bpai-bprà-thêet-ang-grìt
I have never been to England before.

Example 2:
เธอไม่เคยกินทุเรียนมาก่อน กลิ่นมันแรงเกินไปสำหรับเธอ
thooe-mâi-khooei-gin-thú-riian-maa-gàawn glìn-man-raaeng-gooen-bpai-sǎm-ràp-thooe
She has never eaten durian before. It is too smelly for her.

3 – Past tense (with a focus on the time)

  • Sentence structure: time + sentence

As mentioned earlier, Thai does not have verb conjugation; we rather place a time-indicating word at the beginning or end of the sentence. 

  • If you put the time at the beginning of the sentence, this places emphasis on the time.
  • If you put the time at the end of the sentence, this places emphasis on the action instead. 

In the examples below, note how the time-indicating word is at the beginning of the Thai sentences. 

Example 1:
เมื่อวานนี้แม่เดินทางไปต่างประเทศ
mûuea-waan-níi-mâae-dooen-thaang-bpai-dtàang-bprà-thêet
Mom went abroad yesterday.

Example 2:
เมื่อเช้านี้ฉันลืมหยิบกระเป๋าเงินก่อนออกจากบ้าน
mûuea-cháo-níi-chǎn-luuem-yìp-grà-bpǎo-ngoen-gàawn-àawk-jàak-bâan
I forgot to take my wallet with me before leaving the house this morning.

4 – Past tense (with a focus on the action)

  • Sentence structure: sentence + time

In these examples, the time is placed at the end of the Thai sentences. This indicates that the action is more important than when it took place. 

Example 1:
ฉันไม่ได้ทานข้าวเช้าเพราะตื่นสายเมื่อวานนี้
chǎn-mâi-dâi-thaan-khâao-cháo-phráw-dtùuen-sǎai-mûuea-waan-níi
I didn’t have breakfast yesterday because I woke up late.

Example 2:
น้องสาวของฉันเคยร่างกายไม่แข็งแรงเมื่อก่อนนี้
náawng-sǎao-khǎawng-chǎn-khooei-râang-gaai-mâi-khǎeng-raaeng-mûuea-gàawn-níi
My sister used to be unhealthy in the past.

2. How to Make and Change Plans in Thai

Another set of essential Thai phrases for intermediate learners consists of those for making and changing plans. These phrases and structures can be used in both formal and informal contexts, so you’ll be prepared whether you’re planning a meetup with friends or scheduling a business meeting. 

1 – Is [someone] available [day]?

  • Sentence structure: time + subject + ว่างไหม
  • Pronunciation: time + subject + wâang-mǎi

This intermediate Thai conversational phrase is perfect for asking if someone is free or not, such as if you want to make plans with a friend or schedule an appointment. 

Example 1:
พรุ่งนี้คุณหมอว่างไหมคะ
phrûng-níi-khun-mǎaw-wâang-mǎi-khá
Is the doctor available tomorrow?

Example 2:
วันอาทิตย์หน้าเธอว่างไหม
wan-aa-thít-nâa-thooe-wâang-mǎi
Are you available next Sunday?

2 – Do you want to … together?

  • Sentence structure: ไป + verb + object (if any) + กันไหม
  • Pronunciation: bpai + verb + object (if any) + gan-mǎi

This phrase will come in handy if you ever want to invite someone to do something with you. This is especially important as you begin making friends or going on dates

Example 1:
ไปดูหนังด้วยกันไหมครับ
bpai-duu-nǎng-dûuai-gan-mǎi-khráp
Do you want to watch a movie together?

A Man and a Woman Having Coffee Together

Do you want to watch a movie together?

Example 2:
ไปเที่ยวหัวหินกันมั้ย
bpai-thîiao-hǔua-hǐn-gan-mái
Do you want to go to Huahin together?

3 – Will [someone] …?

  • Sentence structure: subject + จะ + verb + object (if any) + ไหม
  • Pronunciation: subject + + verb + object (if any) + mǎi

This phrase is pretty similar to the last one we saw, but it has a different meaning. Rather than being used to invite someone to do something, it’s used to ask if someone is going to do something. Check the examples to see how this useful Thai phrase pattern for intermediate learners might be used in a real-life conversation.

Example 1:
พรุ่งนี้เธอจะไปตลาดไหม
phrûng-níi-thooe-jà-bpai-dtà-làat-mǎi
Will you go to the market tomorrow?

Example 2:
เย็นนี้แม่จะทำอาหารเย็นมั้ย
yen-níi-mâae-jà-tham-aa-hǎan-yen-mái
Will mom cook dinner this evening?

4 – Can I bring … with me?

  • Sentence structure: พา + someone + ได้ด้วยได้ไหม
  • Pronunciation: phaa + someone + bpai-dûuai-dâi-mǎi

You can use this intermediate Thai phrase to ask if you can bring someone with you to do something. 

Example 1:
ที่นัดกันไปซื้อของวันพรุ่งนี้ ฉันพาแฟนไปด้วยได้ไหม
thîi-nát-gan-bpai-súue-khǎawng-wan-phrûng-níi chǎn-phaa-faaen-bpai-dûuai-dâi-mǎi
For our shopping trip tomorrow, can I bring my boyfriend?

Example 2:
เราพาเพื่อนไปงานวันเกิดเธอด้วยได้มั้ย
rao-phaa-phûuean-bpai-ngaan-wan-gòoet-thooe-dûuai-dâi-mái
Can I bring my friend with me to your birthday party?

3. How to Explain and Give Reasons in Thai

Some of the most important intermediate phrases in the Thai language are those for explaining and giving reasons. Below, we have listed the most common structures you can use for these purposes. 

1 – …because…

  • Sentence structure: sentence 1 (result) + เพราะ / เพราะว่า + sentence 2 (cause)
  • Pronunciation: sentence 1 (result) + phráw / phráw-wâa + sentence 2 (cause)

This is an intermediate Thai phrase that’s best used in more casual contexts. 

Example 1:
เธอไม่ได้ไปทำงานเพราะเธอไม่สบาย
thooe-mâi-dâi-bpai-tham-ngaan-phráw-thooe-mâi-sà-baai
She didn’t go to work because she didn’t feel well.

Example 2:
ลดาไม่ซื้อขนมเพราะว่าเธอลดความอ้วนอยู่
lá-daa-mâi-súue-khà-nǒm-phráw-wâa-thooe-lót-kwaam-ûuan-yùu
Lada didn’t buy any snacks because she is on a diet.

2 – The reason why [someone] does [something] is …

  • Sentence structure: เหตุผลที่ + [someone] does [something] + คือ
  • Pronunciation: hèet-phǒn-thîi + [someone] does [something] + khuue

This is a formal intermediate phrase to use when you want to explain why someone does something.

Example 1:
เหตุผลที่แป้งขายรถคือเธอต้องการเงิน
hèet-phǒn-thîi-bpâaeng-khǎai-rót-khuue-thooe-dtâawng-gaan-ngoen
The reason why Pang sold her car is that she needs money.

Example 2:
เหตุผลที่ณพงศ์หย่ากับภรรยาคือภรรยาเขามีชู้
hèet-phǒn-thîi-ná-phong-yàa-gàp-phan-rá-yaa-khuue-phan-rá-yaa-khǎo-mii-chúu
The reason why Napong divorced his wife is that his wife had an affair.

A Couple Sitting on a Couch with Their Backs to Each Other

The reason why Napong divorced his wife is that his wife had an affair.

3 – First… second… third…

  • Sentence structure: หนึ่ง… + สอง… + สาม…
  • Pronunciation: nùeng… + sǎawng… + sǎam…

This is an extremely useful intermediate Thai phrase used to list several reasons. You can also use it to list items. 

Example 1:
เธอสอบตกเพราะหนึ่งเธอไม่ตั้งใจเรียน สองเธอไม่อ่านหนังสือ และสามเธอไม่ทำการบ้าน
thooe-sàawp-dtòk-phráw-nùeng-thooe-mâi-dtâng-jai-riian sǎawng-thooe-mâi-àan-nǎng-sǔue sǎam-thooe-mâi-tham-gaan-bâan
You failed the exam because: First, you didn’t pay attention in class; second, you didn’t review your lesson; and third, you didn’t do your homework.

Example 2:
เหตุผลที่วรรณาชอบโรงแรมนี้คือหนึ่งที่พักสะอาด สองวิวสวย สามอาหารอร่อย และสี่ราคาไม่แพง
hèet-phǒn-thîi-wan-naa-châawp-roong-raaem-níi-khuue-nùeng-thîi-phák-sà-àat sǎawng-wiu-sǔuai sǎam-aa-hǎan-à-ràauy láe-sìi-raa-khaa-mâi-phaaeng
The reasons why Wanna likes this hotel are: First, it is clean; second, the view is nice; third, the food is delicious; and fourth, it is inexpensive.

4. How to React in Daily Thai Conversations 

As someone who is learning the Thai language, you probably aim to become fluent and to have more natural conversations. One of the best ways to sound more like a native speaker is to use reaction phrases when appropriate. Below, we have listed a few of the most common reactions in Thai that you can start applying to your conversations right away. 

1 – Very good.

  • Phrase: ดีมาก
  • Pronunciation: dii-mâak

You can use this intermediate Thai phrase when you think that the other party has done something well or that the current situation is good.

Example 1:
เธอเตรียมงานเรียบร้อยแล้วใช่มั้ย ดีมาก
thooe-dtriiam-ngaan-rîiap-ráauy-láaeo-châi-mái dii-mâak
Did you finish the work preparation? Very good.

Example 2:
ลูกสอบได้ที่หนึ่งนี่ ดีมาก
lûuk-sàawp-dâi-thîi-nùeng-nîi dii-mâak
You got the highest score on the test. Very good.

2 – Very good. [casual]

This phrase is the more informal version of the previous one. 

Example 1:  
เยี่ยมมาก ทุกคนทำได้ดีมากค่ะ
yîiam-mâak thúk-khon-tham-dâi-dii-mâak-khà
Very good. Everyone did very well.

Example 2:
พยากรณ์อากาศบอกว่าวันนี้แดดจะออกทั้งวัน เยี่ยมมาก
phá-yaa-gaawn-aa-gàat-bàawk-wâa-wan-níi-dàaet-jà-àawk-tháng-wan yîiam-mâak
The weather forecast says it will be sunny all day today. Very good.

A Woman Raising Her Arms to the Sunshine

The weather forecast says it will be sunny all day today. Very good.

3 – Very good. [slang / girl talk]

You will find that women use this word quite a lot when talking to their friends. Its meaning is the same as ดีมาก (dii-mâak) and เยี่ยมมาก (yîiam-mâak).

Example 1:
เครื่องสำอางค์ลดราคาแหละ เริ่ด
khrûueang-sǎm-aang-lót-raa-khaa-làe rôoet
The cosmetics are on sale now. Very good.

Example 2:
แกใส่ชุดนี้แล้วเริ่ดมาก
gaae-sài-chút-níi-láaeo-rôoet-mâak
You look very good in that dress.

4 – What!!

  • Phrase: ว่าไงนะ
  • Pronunciation: wâa-ngai-ná
  • Literal meaning: What did you just say?

This intermediate Thai phrase is an informal way of showing that you’re shocked/surprised by what someone has said or by a situation. It implies that you want them to repeat the message again because what you heard is unbelievable.

Example 1:
ว่าไงนะ แกถูกหวยเหรอ!!
wâa-ngai-ná gaae-thùuk-hǔuai-rhǒoe
What!! You won the lottery?

Example 2:
ว่าไงนะ ไฟไหม้โรงงาน!!
wâa-ngai-ná fai-mâi-roong-ngaan
What!! There is a fire at the factory?

5 – What!!

  • Phrase: อะไรนะ
  • Pronunciation: à-rai-ná
  • Literal meaning: What?

This phrase has exactly the same meaning as ว่าไงนะ (wâa-ngai-ná), and the two phrases are interchangeable. 

Example 1:
อะไรนะ แกใช้เงินเดือนหมดแล้ว! แต่นี่มันเพิ่งต้นเดือนเองนะ
à-rai-ná gaae-chái-ngoen-duuean-mòt-láaeo dtàae-nîi-man-phôeng-dtôn-duuean-eeng-ná
What? You spent all your monthly allowance? But this is just the beginning of the month!

Example 2:
อะไรนะ น้องมีหนี้บัตรเครดิต 1 ล้านบาท!
à-rai-ná náawng-mii-nîi-bàt-khree-dìt-nùeng-láan-bàat
What? You have a credit card debt of one million Baht?

6 – Really?

  • Phrase: จริงเหรอ
  • Pronunciation: jing-rǒoe
  • Literal meaning: Is it true?

You would use this intermediate Thai phrase to show that you doubt whether what the other party said is true.

Example 1:
จริงเหรอ เธออายุ 35 แล้วแน่นะ
jing-rǒoe thooe-aa-yú-sǎam-sìp-hâa-láaeo-nâae-ná
Really? Are you really 35 years old?

Example 2:
ตะวันสอบเลขผ่าน จริงเหรอ
dtà-wan-sàawp-lêek-phàan jing-rǒoe
Tawan passed the math test. Really?

7 – Expressing your thoughts and feelings with adjectives 

  • Sentence structure: adj. + จัง
  • Pronunciation: adj. + jang

You can also use adjectives to express your thoughts or feelings about something. 

Example 1:
ร้อนจัง
ráawn-jang
So hot.

Example 2:
สวยจัง อยากได้บ้าง
sǔuai-jang yàak-dâi-bâang
So beautiful; I want one, too.

5. How to Use Etiquette Phrases in Thai

Finally, let us look at a few intermediate phrases in Thai that you can use in order to be polite in different situations. Learning these phrases will be useful for your daily interactions in both casual and formal contexts. 

1 – Welcome.

This phrase is used to welcome guests in formal situations. 

Example 1:
โรงแรมริมแพ ยินดีต้อนรับค่ะ
roong-raaem-rim-phaae yin-dii-dtâawn-ráp-khâ
Welcome to Rimphaae Hotel.

Example 2:
ยินดีต้อนรับสู่บริษัทของเราค่ะ
yin-dii-dtâawn-ráp-sùu-baaw-rí-sàt-khǎawng-rao-khâ
Welcome to our company.

2 – Please come in.

  • Phrase: เชิญ
  • Pronunciation: chooen
  • Literal meaning: invite

You would use this phrase when inviting someone into your home or place of business. 

Example 1:
เชิญค่ะ กี่ที่คะ
chooen-khâ gìi-thîi-khá
Please come in. How many people? [in a restaurant]

Example 2:
เชิญค่ะ ตามสบายนะคะ
chooen-khâ dtaam-sà-baai-ná-khá
Please come in. Make yourself at home.

3 – Make yourself at home.

When you invite someone to your place and want them to relax, you can use this Thai phrase.

Example 1:
ของบนโต๊ะนี้กินได้หมดเลย ตามสบายนะ
khǎawng-bon-dtó-níi-gin-dái-mòt-looei dtaam-sà-baai-ná
You can eat all of the food on this table. Make yourself at home.

Example 2:
เข้ามาเลย ตามสบายนะ
khâo-maa-looei dtaam-sà-baai-ná
Come in; make yourself at home.

4 – If you have any questions, please ask.

  • Phrase: ถ้าสงสัยอะไร ถามได้นะ
  • Pronunciation: thâa-sǒng-sǎi-à-rai thǎam-dâi-ná
  • Literal meaning: If you doubt anything, you can ask. 

You might hear this Thai phrase after someone explains something to you, for example. 

Example 1:
ข้อมูลทั้งหมดอยู่ในคู่มือนี้ ถ้าอ่านแล้วสงสัยอะไร ถามได้นะครับ
khâaw-muun-tháng-mòt-yùu-nai-khûu-muue-níi thâa-àan-láaeo-sǒng-sǎi-à-rai thǎam-dâi-ná-khráp
All the information is in the manual. If you have any questions after reading it, please ask.

Example 2:
ผมขอจบการพรีเซนต์เพียงเท่านี้ ถ้าสงสัยอะไร ถามได้นะครับ
phǒm-khǎaw-jòp-gaan-phrii-sén-phiiang-thâo-níi thâa-sǒng-sǎi-à-rai thǎam-dâi-ná-khráp
I will end my presentation now. If you have any questions, please ask.

5 – Have a safe trip.

When Thai people know that someone will be traveling, they often wish that person a safe trip using this intermediate-level Thai phrase.

Example 1:
อย่าขับรถเร็วเกินไปหละ เดินทางปลอดภัยนะ
yàa-khàp-rót-reo-gooen-bpai-là dooen-thaang-bplàawt-phai-ná
Don’t drive too fast, and have a safe trip.

Example 2:
แล้วเจอกันพรุ่งนี้ เดินทางปลอดภัยนะ
láaeo-jooe-gan-phrûng-níi dooen-thaang-bplàawt-phai-ná
See you tomorrow. Have a safe trip.

6 – Take care of your health.

  • Phrase: รักษาสุขภาพนะ
  • Pronunciation: rák-sǎa-sùk-khà-phâap-ná
  • Literal meaning: Take care of your health. 

Thai people often use this phrase to show that they care about someone. You can use it with people of all ages.

Example 1:
ช่วงนี้อากาศหนาว รักษาสุขภาพนะคะ
chûuang-níi-aa-gàat-nǎao rák-sǎa-sùk-khà-phâap-ná-khá
It has been quite cold lately; take care of your health.

Example 2:
อาทิตย์หน้า หนูจะมาเยี่ยมคุณยายใหม่ รักษาสุขภาพนะคะ
aa-thít-nâa nǔu-jà-maa-yîiam-khun-yaai-mài rák-sǎa-sùk-khà-phâap-ná-khá
I will visit you (grandma) again next week. Take care of your health.

A Woman Holding an Older Woman’s Hands in Her Own

I will visit you [grandma] again next week. Take care of your health.

7 – Good luck.

When you part ways with someone, you can use this intermediate Thai phrase to wish them luck.

Example 1:
พรุ่งนี้เธอมีสอบนี่ โชคดีนะ
phrûng-níi-thooe-mii-sàawp-nîi chôok-dii-ná
You have a test tomorrow. Good luck.

Example 2:
อย่าลืมเอาโน๊ตบุ๊คไปด้วยหละ โชคดีนะ
yàa-luuem-ao-nóot-búk-bpai-dûuai-là chôok-dii-ná
Don’t forget to bring a laptop with you. Good luck.

6. Conclusion

ดีมากค่ะ (dii-mâak-khâ)! You have already reached the end of this article and picked up the essential Thai phrases for intermediate learners. It will take some time and practice to master these phrases, so don’t feel bad if you can’t remember them all right away.

What are your thoughts on this lesson? Did you think it was too hard, or maybe too easy? Please let us know in the comments! 

Since you’ve finished learning these Thai phrases for the intermediate level, don’t forget to visit ThaiPod101.com and create your free lifetime account today. We have a variety of fun and interesting Thai lessons for you! We recommend starting with these:

Happy Thai learning!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai