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10 Reasons Why You Should Learn the Thai Language

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So, you’re thinking about learning a foreign language…but you’re not quite convinced that it’s worth the time and effort. Or maybe you’re aware of the benefits bilingualism can bring, but you’re not sure which language you should pursue. 

If you’re feeling stuck and need that extra push to start working toward your linguistic aspirations, you’ve come to the right place! 

In this article, we’ll give you 10 compelling answers to the question “Why learn Thai?” 

Some of the reasons we list can be applied to any foreign language (career opportunities and personal growth), while others are unique to Thai (familiarity with the Thai culture and better access to the country). 

Let’s dig in!

A Woman Thinking against a White Background

Why should you learn Thai?

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Thailand has a rich culture.
  2. It’s a nice place for retirement.
  3. Learning Thai will increase your work opportunities and career options.
  4. It will also increase your business opportunities.
  5. You’ll have better travel experiences.
  6. You’ll be able to communicate better with loved ones.
  7. Your life in Thailand will be much more convenient.
  8. You’ll have a better chance of wooing a Thai lover.
  9. The grammar is actually pretty easy!
  10. You can learn Thai online, anywhere and anytime.
  11. Conclusion

1. Thailand has a rich culture.

Thailand may be a famous travel destination with natural beauty and an inexpensive cost of living, but many people become interested in something else while visiting: the Thai society and culture. 

Thai food is delicious, the local art is unique and beautiful, and many people like how Thai people live.  

If you like Thailand, this is a great reason why you should learn Thai. The language itself is a part of Thai culture, and knowing at least the basics will enable you to understand the culture and society better.

2. It’s a nice place for retirement.

Thinking about retirement? Here are just a few reasons Thailand is the perfect place to spend your golden years: 

But there’s a hitch: Not all Thai people can speak English.  

Close your eyes and imagine you’re grocery shopping or trying to go somewhere by yourself. You try asking someone for help, but you cannot communicate with anyone because of the language barrier. As a result, you end up spending money on something you don’t want or get lost.

So, if your retirement plan is to live in Thailand, learning the Thai language is essential. If you can communicate, life will be much easier for you!

An Old Man Painting Something

I want to live in Thailand after retirement.

3. Learning Thai will increase your work opportunities and career options.

Another compelling reason why you should learn Thai is that it will benefit your work life—especially if you plan to work abroad or with an international company! 

First of all, it will make communication with your coworkers so much easier. Most of the Thai people you’ll work with may not be able to communicate in English well, so knowing their language will allow for smoother operations in the workplace.

Second, learning the Thai language will help you understand the Thai culture and how Thai people think. When working abroad, cultural differences in the workplace often cause problems. Knowing the Thai language can help you see your coworkers’ point of view and reduce the number of issues resulting from cultural differences. 

Third, better communication can improve the quality of work and even lead to a promotion!

Finally, learning a foreign language broadens your career options. Thailand is quite open to foreign workers, and knowing Thai will give you more career opportunities in this beautiful country. 

4. It will also increase your business opportunities.

As mentioned earlier, learning the language will help you understand Thai people better—and this is the key to doing good business here! 

Your cultural knowledge, combined with the insight you gain through conversations with others, will make you a more appealing individual with whom to do business. And believe us, there are tons of business opportunities here! For example, you could…

  • …invest in interesting projects that have a chance to be successful but have no funding.  
  • …invent products and services for Thai people.  
  • …find markets for Thai exported products.
  • …own and operate a big business in Thailand.
A Man Shaking Hands with a Woman During a Business-related Meeting

Because I know Thai, I am able to make great business deals.

5. You’ll have better travel experiences.

When you travel, it’s always better to know the language of the country you’re visiting. Before we get ahead of ourselves, though…what makes Thailand such a fantastic travel destination? 

  • Thailand is full of natural beauty.
  • The country has a unique art scene. 
  • The food here is to die for! 
  • Believe it or not, traveling in Thailand is fairly inexpensive. 

Future plans to visit this stunning country is a great reason to learn Thai, and here’s why: 

First of all, there will be less chance of you getting lost—and even if you did get really lost, you could ask locals for directions. On a side note: Don’t be afraid to ask locals for help! Even if your Thai isn’t up to par yet, most locals will be more than willing to help you out. 

Second, you’ll be able to experience living like a local. Some tourists worry about the language barrier; they typically feel more comfortable going to restaurants with menus in English or places with English-speaking staff. However, if you know the Thai language, you won’t have to worry about that at all. You’ll be able to visit the restaurants and places most popular among locals.

Third, you can bargain and ask for discounts when shopping. Anyone who loves shopping also loves a good discount. And let us tell you, if you go to a Thai market and can talk the talk, most sellers will often give you a small discount or giveaway.  

6. You’ll be able to communicate better with loved ones.

Speaking in English with Thai people—even if they know the language well—is not the same as using their native tongue. 

If you have family members, a partner, or friends who are Thai, communicating with them in their mother tongue can strengthen your bonds with them. Taking the time and putting in the effort to learn their language will show them you care and really want to maintain a good relationship.

Moreover, your loved one will be more than happy to help you practice your Thai once you make the commitment—it’s a win-win situation!

Two Thai Women Sitting on a Sofa and Talking

I can talk to my Thai friend in Thai.

7. Your life in Thailand will be much more convenient. 

Do you plan to live or work in Thailand? Or maybe you want to visit often? These are good reasons why you should learn Thai! 

We’ve touched on this a little bit in our previous points, but to recap, you’ll be able to…

  • …visit a greater variety of restaurants, shops, and less-touristic locations with ease! 
  • …read signs and understand announcements. 
  • …communicate with Thai people who do not speak English well (juristic office staff, mechanics, etc.). 

8. You’ll have a better chance of wooing a Thai lover. 

Communication is key in any romantic relationship. When you live together with someone, you want to talk to one another and share your thoughts. 

If you’ve recently found yourself swooning over a potential Thai lover, you should consider making the effort to learn their native tongue. After all, Google Translate isn’t really a practical way to share your innermost feelings with someone. 

Do you already have a Thai partner? Then learning their mother tongue will show them that you’re willing to go the extra mile! 

9. The grammar is actually pretty easy! 

While deciding whether to learn a foreign language or not, one usually takes into consideration how difficult that language is. If a given language is particularly difficult or has complex grammar rules, you might opt to study a different one. 

Fortunately for you, Thai grammar is very easy! Here’s why:

  • There is no grammatical gender.
  • There is no verb conjugation.  
  • Most of the sentence structures are quite simple and similar to those in English.  

For more useful information on the topic, visit our lesson on Thai Grammar or read our article Is Thai Difficult to Learn? (And Tips to Succeed!).

10. You can learn Thai online, anywhere and anytime.

Still wondering why to learn Thai? 

Well, studying foreign languages is so much easier today than in times past. 

With the internet, you can learn Thai at your own pace from anywhere in the world. If you’re wondering where to learn Thai online, look no further than ThaiPod101.com! While there are a few different resources available, we can offer the best results! 

Our professional language learning platform has become one of the best ways to learn Thai. We create lessons and materials designed to speed up your learning progress, and we even design curated pathways for learners at different levels. When you create your account with ThaiPod101, you get all of this in addition to support from Thai teachers and practical tips on how to learn Thai effectively.

A Woman Doing Something on Her Tablet

It’s so convenient to learn Thai online at ThaiPod101.com.

11. Conclusion

As you can see, there are many good reasons for you to learn Thai.  

After reading this article, what are your thoughts on learning the language? Are you any closer to making a decision? 

If you would like to sample what to expect from the Thai language (and from our learning platform), we recommend checking out these fun lessons on ThaiPod101.com: 

Happy learning!

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How Long Does it Take to Learn Thai?

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If you’re like most aspiring language learners, you’ve probably asked this all-too-common question at some point: How long does it take to learn Thai? 

Thai is not an easy language to learn, especially for a native English speaker. You’ll have to learn a whole new reading and writing system, study a new set of grammar rules, and—most difficult of all—get the hang of Thai pronunciation. Fortunately, the grammar part is pretty simple as there’s no verb conjugation to worry about (tense, mood, and gender play no role here).  

Taking the language’s difficulty into consideration, what kind of time commitment should you expect? 

In this article, we’ll take a look at the three different levels of Thai fluency: beginner, intermediate, and advanced. For each level, we will provide a list of abilities the learner should have at that stage (based on the CU-TFL test for non-native speakers). In addition, we’ll talk about the different factors that can influence your progress and give you tips on how to learn the Thai language faster. 

Let’s go!

How Long Does It Take to Learn Thai?
Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Factors That Affect Your Thai Language Learning
  2. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Beginner Level?
  3. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Intermediate Level?
  4. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Advanced Level?
  5. Conclusion

1. Factors That Affect Your Thai Language Learning

Before we get ahead of ourselves, you should know that there’s no concrete answer regarding how long it takes to learn Thai. There are many factors that can affect your Thai learning progress:

  • Where you live.

    If you live in Thailand or visit the country often, you’ll naturally become more familiar with the Thai language. This frequent exposure will help you pick up basic words and phrases, and get you acquainted with Thai pronunciation.
  • Whether you have Thai people in your life.

    One of the best ways to gain Thai speaking skills is to practice with native speakers. If you have family members, friends, or colleagues who are Thai, you can pick up the language much more quickly!
  • Your reasons for learning the language.

    Why are you learning Thai? If you chose to learn Thai for personal reasons, such as interest in the culture or a loved one who speaks the language, you’re more likely to learn it well!
  • Your opportunities to use Thai.

    The more you use the language, the better your language skills will become. By practicing what you learn, you’re allowing yourself to internalize the information and concepts—the ultimate key to success!
  • Your learning ability.

    Is langu1age learning your specialty, or are you better at math and science? Are you a fast learner in general? How’s your memory? Your learning experience and abilities have a massive effect on how long it will take you to learn Thai.
  • Your learning resources and methods.

    Who’s teaching you Thai? What materials are you using? Having good Thai learning resources for your studies is like having a good car for driving: It will help you get to your destination faster and with fewer issues.

To put it simply: If you’re in a good environment for learning Thai, you can learn it faster.

2. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Beginner Level?

So, how long does it take to learn basic Thai? 

It should take around 500 hours (20 weeks if you study 25 hours a week).  

Thai Skills Needed for Beginner Level

In order to reach the beginner level, there are a few skills you’ll need to master. 

Reading: 

  • Memorize all characters of the Thai script. 
  • Memorize the vocabulary used in daily life.
  • Understand basic phrases and sentences. 
  • Read and understand signs written in basic language.
  • Understand basic written orders and instructions.
  • Understand vocabulary associated with the characteristics of objects, people, and places.

Listening: 

  • Understand short, simple sentences.
  • Understand the phrases used in day-to-day conversations.
  • Memorize key phrases used during social interactions.

Speaking: 

  • Use simple words and sentence structures to make basic conversation. 
  • Communicate effectively in daily life.

Writing: 

  • Write simple words, phrases, or sentences used in daily life.
  • You tend to use the same simple sentence structures over and over again.
  • You will probably make a lot of spelling and spacing mistakes.  

Learning Tips for Beginners

500 hours is a long time! But luckily for you, we’re here with some tips on how to learn basic Thai more effectively. 

  • Memorize all 44 consonants and 21 vowels early on.

    Instead of learning with romanization, you should learn all of the Thai characters right from the start. Doing so will make Thai pronunciation easier for you to master. A great way to really internalize them is to listen to and repeat after the alphabet songs Thai children listen to.
  • Practice the five tones.

    The hardest part of learning Thai is the pronunciation, especially when it comes to the tones. In Thai, the consonant and vowel sounds combine with one of five tones in order to form different words. Practicing these five tones early on will help you become familiar with them from the start, and help you make faster progress later on!
  • Memorize the most important vocabulary used in daily life.

    Beginner-level students should be able to make and understand day-to-day conversations, so it’s very important to remember key vocabulary. Using flashcards and trying to remember words and phrases based on category is a great idea at this point.
  • Listen to Thai songs.

    Listening to Thai songs is a great way to become familiar with the pronunciation, even if you can’t understand the lyrics. This is an enjoyable study method that you can do at the same time as other activities: during your morning routine, on the way to work, while exercising, etc. It won’t take long for you to find yourself pleasantly surprised at how much vocabulary you’ve picked up through songs!
I Love Thai Songs.
  • Watch educational kids’ shows or cartoons.

    Even Thai children pick up the language through educational shows and cartoons, which makes this a wonderful learning resource for non-native beginners.
  • Read kids’ tales or stories.

    Stories for children are often written using simple language, which makes them good for both reading and pronunciation practice.

How ThaiPod101 Can Help

ThaiPod101.com is the best place to learn Thai online. In addition to our recommended lesson pathways for beginners, we have plenty of fun and effective resources you can take advantage of from Day One! 

  • Our Thai Alphabet Video

    If you’ve just started learning Thai, we recommend beginning with our Thai alphabet video. As mentioned earlier, learning the Thai alphabet should be your first priority as this will speed up your progress and make your continued studies easier. We have a few lessons and articles on our website covering this topic, but many new students benefit from visual and auditory learning. Click the link above to visit our Thai alphabet video on YouTube!
  • ThaiPod101 YouTube Channel

    Speaking of YouTube, have you been to our channel? We provide fun, engaging content on a range of topics, from vocabulary and pronunciation to culture!
  • Flashcards

    Wondering how to learn Thai vocabulary effectively? Use the spaced repetition flashcards on our website to memorize new words and phrases via a proven method!
  • Painless Thai Grammar

    Our Painless Thai Grammar lesson is the perfect place to get some useful tips on how to learn the more difficult grammar concepts. However, we also have tons of other lessons on various Thai grammar points! You may find it useful to write three original sentences after each lesson, applying the concept(s) you just learned; this will help you ensure you understood the lesson correctly.
  • Introduction to Thai Writing

    If you aren’t sure how to learn Thai writing, we recommend visiting our Introduction to Thai Writing page. Here, you’ll find all of the information you need to know as a beginner. Learning to write in Thai will be even easier with the help of a native speaker, so you may want to upgrade to Premium PLUS and utilize our MyTeacher service. This way, you can practice writing sentences and then send them to your personal teacher for feedback!
Write Three Original Sentences for Your Teacher.
  • Ultimate Thai Pronunciation Guide

    Another page you should visit is our Ultimate Thai Pronunciation Guide. This lesson will provide you with all of the basics you need to know, so you can get a good headstart on your learning. It will be hard to get the pronunciation and tones correct by yourself, so you should record yourself speaking and send the audio to your teacher for feedback.

3. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Intermediate Level?

How long does it take to learn intermediate-level Thai? It should take around 1,100 hours (44 weeks if you study 25 hours a week). Following is a breakdown of what you should know… 

Thai Skills Needed for Intermediate Level

To complete the intermediate level, here are the Thai language skills you need to have. 

Reading:

  • Understand short essays or stories on topics that interest you (or that you’re specialized in) with long and complicated sentences.   
  • Identify the main idea of an essay or story. 
  • Understand the context of a sentence.

Listening:  

  • Understand stories when spoken in a clear fashion at normal speed.
  • You might still be unable to understand long and complicated stories.

Speaking: 

  • Use both formal and informal language when speaking, and offer opinions on topics that are familiar to you.
  • Communicate with Thai people on less-familiar topics (though you might struggle) and use some non-verbal language.

Writing:  

  • Write essays with a good flow in terms of time, ideas, and logic.
  • Use conjunctions in essays and other texts.
  • Describe, explain, and give information via writing.
  • You might still make some mistakes in spelling, spacing, and word choice.

Learning Tips for Intermediate-Level Students

Reaching this level is a huge time commitment, but we have a few tips on how to learn Thai more quickly. 

  • Read short stories or essays on topics that interest you.

    To write well, you should start by reading so you become more familiar with sentence structure and how to use conjunctions. By reading stories or essays that match your interests, you’ll make the process more enjoyable and might be able to memorize even more vocabulary.
  • Translate short stories or essays.

    This will allow you to pick up more useful vocabulary and become familiar with things like conjunctions and essay structures. As with the tip above, you should make sure to pick short stories or essays on topics that fascinate you. For example, if you like cooking, try translating your special recipe into Thai.
  • Watch Thai TV shows, movies, or dramas.

    Watching Thai TV shows, movies, or dramas is a great way to practice listening and become more familiar with how Thai people speak in various situations.
Thai Movies Are Fun.

How ThaiPod101 Can Help 

ThaiPod101.com has plenty of useful resources for intermediate learners, too! Here are just a few recommended pages and tools for you. 

  • 5 Tips to Reach Intermediate Level 

    If you’re feeling stuck at the beginner stage, listen to these five tips from Alisha on how to finally move forward to the intermediate level.
  • Intermediate-Level YouTube Videos

    Of course, our YouTube channel features plenty of fun and educational videos designed for intermediate-level learners. Check it out!

4. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Advanced Level?

To become completely fluent in Thai, you’ll need to put in a whopping 2,500 hours (100 weeks if you study 25 hours a week). Here’s everything you should know about reaching the advanced level. 

Thai Skills Needed for Advanced Level

Reading:

  • Understand both academic and non-academic texts on a variety of topics, featuring both complex and simple sentences. 
  • Know and be able to use Thai idioms, proverbs, and other sayings that aren’t used much in daily life.

Listening: 

  • Understand both academic and non-academic stories, even when the speaker talks quickly. 
  • Understand the tone of the speaker and the cultural/societal context within the story. 

Speaking: 

  • Use formal/informal language as required by the situation. 
  • Communicate well on a variety of topics. 
  • Give explanations and opinions, influence and persuade others, and make compromises. 
  • Use all Thai vocabulary and grammar correctly, including slang, idioms, and proverbs.
  • Have a good understanding of Thai culture and apply this to your speech. 

Writing:

  • Write essays on various topics.
  • Explain, discuss, share opinions, and do creative writing.
  • Use suitable words and sentence structures, as well as idioms, proverbs, and other Thai sayings.
  • Write essays with good flow in terms of time, ideas, and logic, with a solid conclusion at the end.

Learning Tips for Advanced Students

  • Read and summarize academic essays.

    You likely have no problem with non-academic topics at this point, so you should focus on the academic part. By reading and summarizing essays written in Thai, you can learn new words and structures and practice writing.
  • Watch or listen to Thai news.

    Listening to something more formal like the news will help you become familiar with academic vocabulary that’s less common in daily life.
  • Watch Thai TV shows, movies, or dramas in various genres.

    Watching Thai movies and shows is a great way to practice your listening and become more familiar with Thai culture. It will also expose you to various Thai accents, and give you a better idea of how idioms and proverbs are used in different contexts.
  • Debate on various topics.

    Try debating with your Thai friends on various topics. This will help you practice explaining concepts, giving your opinions, influencing others, persuading your audience, and making compromises.
Let’s Debate on Which Is the Healthier Way to Cook: Boiling or Steaming?

How ThaiPod101 Can Help

  • Conversation Starters for Advanced Listeners

    Knowing how to start and hold conversations is a crucial skill for advanced-level learners. In our Conversation Starters for Advanced Learners series, you can listen to various Thai-related stories to improve your listening and speaking skills.
  • Must-Know Thai Slang Words & Phrases

    Knowing how to use slang, idioms, and proverbs is a major step forward. In our Must-Know Thai Slang Words & Phrases series, you’ll be able to learn phrases you wouldn’t find in a textbook—from sayings about personalities and electronics, to words you can use to sound cuter!
  • Advanced-Level YouTube Videos

    Finally, our YouTube channel has plenty of videos geared toward advanced-level learners. Pick up more complex phrases and sentences, dive deeper into various grammar concepts, discover more about Thai culture, and have fun the entire time!

Conclusion

By this point, we’re sure that you have a better idea of how long it takes to learn Thai. What are your thoughts on the topic? If you’ve already started learning Thai, please comment below to let your fellow language learners know how long it took you to get where you are!

Since you’re reading this article, you’re surely interested in the Thai language and/or culture. ThaiPod101.com has an array of fun but practical lessons and materials you’re sure to enjoy going through! Create your free lifetime account today to get the most out of your time studying with us, and see your progress soar.

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The Top 30 Thai Proverbs and Sayings

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Thai people have been using metaphors in day-to-day life for a very long time, so it’s not surprising that proverbs are so prominent in the Thai language today. As a learner of the language, you can greatly benefit from studying Thai proverbs. Doing so will not only help you sound more like a native speaker, but it will also give you more insight into Thai culture and the way Thai people think. 

In this lesson, we’ll go over the characteristics of Thai proverbs and present you with a list of the top thirty Thai proverbs and sayings you should learn. Each proverb on our list is accompanied by a detailed explanation and an example of how to use it properly. 

Enjoy!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. An Introduction to Thai Proverbs
  2. Good Doctrines
  3. Things You Should Do
  4. Things You Shouldn’t Do
  5. Conclusion

1. An Introduction to Thai Proverbs 

To begin, let’s break down the Thai word for “proverb”: สุภาษิต (sù-phaa-sìt).

  • สุ () – good
  • ภาษิต (phaa-sìt) – educational phrases that have been passed down from generation to generation

So literally, สุภาษิต (sù-phaa-sìt) refers to a good phrase that has been used to teach people for a long time.

A สุภาษิต (sù-phaa-sìt) is a metaphor that’s used to teach people so that they learn and become better. It’s often written in rhyme, making it easy to remember. 

In Thai, idioms and proverbs are very similar. Because they’re both metaphors, Thai people have a hard time differentiating between the two and often group them together as สำนวนสุภาษิตไทย (sǎm-nuuan-sù-phaa-sìt-thai). One trick you can use is to ask, “Can you use this phrase to teach people or not?” If you can, then it’s a สุภาษิต (sù-phaa-sìt), or Thai proverb. If you can’t, then it’s just a Thai idiom, or สำนวนไทย (sǎm-nuuan-thai).

In the following section, you’ll learn a variety of Thai proverbs and sayings. We’ve included the literal translation of each proverb, as well as a close English proverb and an explanation of how to use it. These proverbs are divided into three categories: 

  • Good Doctrines
  • Things You Should Do
  • Things You Shouldn’t Do 

Let’s get to it! 

2. Good Doctrines

Here are several Thai proverbs about life and how to live well. 

1 – คุณค่าของคนอยู่ที่ผลงาน

  • Pronunciation: khun-khâa-khǎawng-khon-yùu-thîi-phǒn-ngaan
  • Literal translation: The value of a man comes from his works.
  • Close English proverb: A man of word, not a man of deed, is like a garden full of weeds.

Explanation:
We determine the value of a person’s life based on their actions and the results of those actions. This expression is used to teach people to work diligently and not just lay around all the time. When you work, you get something from it; if you don’t work, it lessens the value of your life.

Example:
คุณค่าของคนอยู่ที่ผลงาน ถ้าไม่ตั้งใจทำงาน เอาแต่เที่ยวเล่น เธอก็จะกลายเป็นคนไม่มีค่า
khun-khâa-khǎawng-khon-yùu-thîi-phǒn-ngaan thâa-mâi-dtâng-jai-tham-ngaan ao-dtàae-thîiao-lên thooe-gâaw-jà-glaai-bpen-khon-mâi-mii-khâa
The value of a man comes from his/her actions. If you don’t pay attention to work, only to partying and drinking, you become worthless.

2 – สำเนียงส่อภาษา กริยาส่อสกุล

  • Pronunciation: sǎm-niiang-sàaw-phaa-sǎa-gì-rí-yaa-sàaw-sà-gun
  • Literal translation: The accent implies your language and the manner implies your clan.
  • Close English proverb: Good manners are part and parcel of a good education.

Explanation:
This Thai proverb means that the way you speak and act reflects how you were raised. It shows whether your parents took care of you and taught you properly. This proverb also reflects the importance of the family unit in Thai society.

Example:
ลูกควรจะพูดจาให้สุภาพตลอดเวลา เพราะ สำเนียงส่อภาษา กริยาส่อสกุล ถ้าพูดจาหยาบคาย คนอื่นจะหาว่า พ่อแม่ไม่สั่งสอนได้
lûuk-khuuan-jà-phûut-jaa-hâi-sù-phâap-dtà-làawt-wee-laa phráw sǎm-niiang-sàaw-phaa-sǎa-gì-rí- yaa-sàaw-sà-gun thâa-phûut-ja-yàap-khaai khon-ùuen-jà-hǎa-wâa-phâaw-mâae-mâi-sàng-šaawn dâai
[speaking to your child] You should speak politely all the time because the way you speak and act reflects how you are being raised. If you speak rudely, others will say that you are not being raised well by your parents.

3 – ไม่มีอะไรสายเกินแก้

  • Pronunciation: mai-mii-à-rai-sǎai-gooen-gâae
  • Literal translation: Nothing is too late to mend.
  • Close English proverb: It is never too late to mend.

Explanation: 
Everybody makes mistakes. This Thai proverb aims to encourage people to fix their mistakes.

Example:
ถึงเธอจะเคยทำตัวไม่ดี แต่เธอก็สามารถปรับปรุงตัวได้ ไม่มีอะไรสายเกินแก้
thǔeng-thooe-jà-khooei-tham-dtuua-mâi-dii dtàae-thooe-gâaw-sǎa-mâat-bpràp-bprung-dtuua-dâai mâi- mii-à-rai-sǎai-gooen-gâae
Despite being bad before, you can improve. Nothing is too late to mend.

4 – ความพยายามอยู่ที่ไหน ความสำเร็จอยู่ที่นั้น

  • Pronunciation: khwaam-phá-yaa-yaam-yùu-thîi-nǎi khwaam-sǎm-rèt-yùu-thîi-nân
  • Literal translation: Where there is an effort, there is a success.
  • Close English proverb: Where there is a will, there is a way.

Explanation:
This Thai proverb means that if you try hard, you’ll be successful. It aims to teach people not to give up easily as everything in life has its challenges.

Example:  
ถึงมันจะยาก แต่ฉันจะทำให้ได้ ความพยายามอยู่ที่ไหน ความสำเร็จอยู่ที่นั่น
thǔeng-man-jà-yâak dtàae-chǎn-jà-tham-hâi-dâai khwaam-phá-yaa-yaam-yùu-thîi-nǎi khwaam-sǎm- rèt-yùu-thîi-nân
Despite it being hard, I will do it. If I try hard, I will be able to do it.

5 – ทำดีได้ดี ทำชั่วได้ชั่ว

  • Pronunciation: tham-dii-dâai-dii tham-chûua-dâai-chûua
  • Literal translation: If you do good, good things come to you. If you do bad, bad things come to you.
  • Close English proverb: What goes around comes around.

Explanation:  
This saying, influenced by Buddhist doctrine, encourages people to always do good things.

Example:  
ถึงแม้จะไม่มีใครเห็น เธอก็ไม่ควรทำสิ่งที่ผิด เพราะ ทำดีได้ดี ทำชั่วได้ชั่ว
thǔeng-máae-jà-mâi-mii-khrai-hěn thooe-gâaw-mâi-khuuan-tham-sìng-thîi-phìt phráw tham-dii-dâai-dii tham-chûua-dâai-chûua
Even though no one will see, you shouldn’t do the wrong thing because if you do good, good things come to you and vice-versa.

6 – คบคนพาล พาลไปหาผิด คบบัณฑิต บัณฑิตพาไปหาผล

  • Pronunciation: khóp-khon-phaan phaan-bpai-hǎa-phìt khóp-ban-dìt ban-dìt-phaa-bpai-haa-phǒn
  • Literal translation: If you have bad friends, they lead you to bad. If you have graduated friends, they lead you to good.
  • Close English proverb: Tell me who your friends are, and I will tell you who you are.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that bad friends will influence you to do bad things, while good friends will influence you to do good things. It aims to teach people that friends or other people you spend time with influence you. If you want to be good and successful, spend time with good people.

Example:  
เวลาคบเพื่อน ให้เลือกคบเพื่อนที่ตั้งใจเรียนนะคะ คบคนพาล พาลไปหาผิด คบบัณฑิต บัณฑิตพาไปหาผล
wee-laa-khóp-phûuean hâi-lûueak-khóp-phûuean-thîi-dtâng-jai-riian-ná-khá khóp-khon-phaan phaan- bpai-hǎa-phìt khóp-ban-dìt ban-dìt-phaa-bpai-hǎa-phǒn
When making friends, choose people who pay attention in class. If you have good friends, they influence you to do good things and vice-versa.

3. Things You Should Do

Now that we’ve gone over a few general sayings about how to live life well, let’s look at some common Thai proverbs that talk about what you should do to be successful. 

7 – นกน้อยทำรังแต่พอตัว

  • Pronunciation: nók-náauy-tham-rang-dtàae-phaaw-dtuua
  • Literal translation: A small bird builds its nest big enough for itself.
  • Close English proverb: Cut your coat according to your clothes.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that you should only buy things you can afford.

Example:  
แม่ว่าหนูซื้อรถรุ่นนี้ก็พอ รุ่นนั้นแพงเกินไป นกน้อยทำรังแต่พอตัวนะจ๊ะ
mâae-wâa-nǔu-súue-rót-rûn-níi-gâaw-phaaw rûn-nán-phaaeng-gooen-bpai nók-náauy-tham-rang- dtàae-phaaw-dtuua ná-já
[mother talking to daughter] I think you should buy this model (car). That model is too expensive. You should buy things based on the amount of money you have.

8 – พูดไปสองไพเบี้ย นิ่งเสียตำลึงทอง

  • Pronunciation: phûut-bpai-sǎawng-phai-bîia nîng-sǐia-dtam-lueng-thaawng
  • Literal translation: Speaking lost two silvers, being silent got one gold.
  • Close English proverb: Silence is golden.

Explanation:  
Sometimes, staying silent is better or more appropriate than speaking out.

Example:  
เขากำลังโกรธ พูดไปก็สองไพเบี้ย นิ่งเสียตำลึงทอง รอเขาอารมณ์ดีก่อนดีกว่า
khǎo-gam-lang-gròot phûut-bpai-gâaw-sǎawng-phai-bîia nîng-sǐia-dtam-lueng-thaawng raaw-khǎo- aa-rom-dii-gàawn-dii-gwàa
He is angry now. It is not good to speak now, so you better stay silent and wait until he is in a good mood.

Silence Is Golden

9 – เข้าเมืองตาหลิ่ว ให้หลิ่วตาตาม

  • Pronunciation: khâo-muueang-dtaa-lìu hai-lìu-dtaa-dtaam
  • Literal translation: Go into the city where people look with one eye, and follow them by looking with one eye.
  • Close English proverb: When in Rome, do as the Romans do.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb encourages us to act as most people do in a given society. When you go to a new place, you should follow the customs and actions of the people there.

Example:  
เข้าเมืองตาหลิ่ว ให้หลิ่วตาตาม ตอนนี้มาอยู่ที่อเมริกาแล้ว จะกินข้าวทุกมื้อก็คงจะไม่สะดวก
khâo-muueang-dtaa-lìu hai-lìu-dtaa-dtaam dtaawn-níi-maa-yùu-thîi-a-mee-rí-gaa-láaeo jà-gin- khâao-thúk-múue-gâaw-khong-jà-mâi-sà-dùuak
You should act as most people do in society. Now that you are in America, eating rice with every meal would be inconvenient.

10 – กันไว้ดีกว่าแก้

  • Pronunciation: gan-wái-dii-gwàa-gâae
  • Literal translation: Prevent is better than repair. 
  • Close English proverb: Prevention is better than a cure.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that it’s better to prevent problems from happening than to solve them. It emphasizes the importance of prevention and preparation, as many problems won’t happen (or have a lesser chance of happening) if you take action in advance.

Example:  
ไปดูทีว่าปิดประตูบ้านดีหรือยัง กันไว้ดีกว่าแก้นะ
bpai-duu-thii-wâa-bpìt-bprà-dtuu-bâan-dii-rúue-yang gan-wái-dii-gwàa-gâae-ná
Go check whether the door is locked properly or not. It is better to prevent problems from happening.

11 – เข้าเถื่อนอย่าลืมพร้า

  • Pronunciation: khâo-thùuean-yàa-luuem-phráa
  • Literal translation: Don’t forget to bring a knife when you go to the jungle.

Explanation:  
This is just another way of saying, “Don’t be reckless.” You have to prepare yourself before doing things.

Example:  
พรุ่งนี้เธอจะเดินทางแล้ว เตรียมตัวหรือยัง เข้าเถื่อนอย่าลืมพร้านะ
phrûng-níi-thooe-jà-dooen-thaang-láaeo dtriiam-dtuua-rǔue-yang khâo-thùuean-yàa-luuem-phráa ná
Tomorrow, you will go traveling. Are you prepared? Don’t be reckless.

12 – คบคนให้ดูหน้า ซื้อผ้าให้ดูเนื้อ

  • Pronunciation: khóp-khon-hâi-duu-nâa súue-phâa-hâi-duu-núuea
  • Literal translation: Look at the face before making a friend with someone, like looking at the cloth itself before buying the clothes.

Explanation:  
There are good people and bad people in society. You should determine whether or not a person is good before becoming friends with them.

Example:  
คบคนให้ดูหน้า ซื้อผ้าให้ดูเนื้อ ฉันว่าคนนั้นพูดจาหยาบคาย เราอย่าไปยุ่งกับเขาเลย
khóp-khon-hâi-duu-nâa súue-phâa-hâi-duu-núuea chǎn-wâa-khon-nán-phûut-jaa-yàap-khaai rao- yàa-bpai-yûng-gàp-khǎo-looei
We have to think before making friends with someone. That person speaks rudely. We shouldn’t associate ourselves with him.

You Should Make Friends with Good People.

13 – ช้า ๆ ได้พร้าเล่มงาม

  • Pronunciation: cháa-cháa-dâai-phráa-lêm-ngaam
  • Literal translation: Slowly to get beautiful knife
  • Close English proverb: Haste makes waste.

Explanation:  
When you do things, you should take the time to do them carefully. The metaphor refers to how you can only make a good knife by taking your time.

Example:  
จะทำงานศิลปะต้องค่อย ๆ ทำถึงจะได้งานที่สวย ช้า ๆ ได้พร้าเล่มงาม
jà-tham-ngaan-sǐn-lá-bpà-dtâawng-khâauy-khâauy-tham-thǔeng-jà-dâai-ngaan-thîi-sǔuai cháa-cháa- dâai-phráa-lêm-ngaam
When you do artwork, you have to do it slowly to get beautiful work. When you do things, you shouldn’t rush; instead, take the time to do it carefully.

14 – น้ำขึ้นให้รีบตัก

  • Pronunciation: náam-khûuen-hâi-rîip-dtàk
  • Literal translation: Quickly fetch the water during the rising tide.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that you should take advantage of opportunities as they arise.

Example:  
ช่วงนี้ ฉันเปิดร้านเร็วกว่าปกติ 1 ชั่วโมง เพราะ คนมาเที่ยวเยอะ น้ำขึ้นต้องรีบตัก
chûuang-níi chǎn-bpòoet-ráan-reo-gwàa-bpòk-gà-dti-nùeng-chûua-moong phráw khon-maa-thîiao-yóe náam-khûen-hâi-rîip-dtàk
Recently, I opened my shop one hour earlier than usual because there are a lot of travelers. I have to take a chance when I have one.

15 – อยู่บ้านท่านอย่านิ่งดูดาย ปั้นวัวปั้นควายให้ลูกท่านเล่น

  • Pronunciation: yùu-bâan-thâan-yàa-nîng-duu-daai bpân-wuua-bpân-khwaai-hâi-lûuk-thâan-lên
  • Literal translation: Don’t do nothing in another’s home; make a cow doll for their child.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that if you live in another person’s house, you should help them. If someone lets you live with them for free, it’s good manners to help them out around the house.

Example:  
ไปพักอยู่บ้านคุณป้าก็ช่วยคุณป้าทำงานบ้านบ้างนะ อยู่บ้านท่านอย่านิ่งดูดาย ปั้นวัวปั้นควายให้ลูกท่านเล่น
bpai-phák-yùu-bâan-khun-bpâa-gâaw-chûuay-khun-bpâa-tham-ngaan-bâan-bâang-ná yùu-bâan- thâan-yàa-nîng-duu-daai bpân-wuua-bpân-khwaai-hâi-lûuk-thâan-lên
Once you live with your aunt, you should help do some of the housework. If you live in another person’s house, you should help them.

Help Your Aunt do Some Housework

16 – เอาใจเขามาใส่ใจเรา

  • Pronunciation: ao-jai-khǎo-maa-sài-jai-rao
  • Literal translation: Put his/her heart into our heart

Explanation:  
This saying means that you should think of others, and pay attention to how they think and feel.

Example:  
ถ้าจะอยู่ด้วยกัน ก็ต้องเอาใจเขามาใส่ใจเรา
thâa-jà-yùu-dûuai-gan gâaw-dtâawng-ao-jai-khǎo-maa-sài-jai-rao
If you want to live together, you have to think of one another.

4. Things You Shouldn’t Do

To conclude our list of popular Thai proverbs, let’s look at some words of wisdom on how not to act. 

17 – หมากัดอย่ากัดตอบ

  • Pronunciation: mǎa-gàt-yàa-gàt-dtàawp 
  • Literal translation: Dog bites, don’t bite back.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that you shouldn’t lower yourself to a bad person’s level in order to fight back. Thai people view those who do bad things or act inappropriately as lower-class people. By doing the same action those people do, you lower yourself. So even when you’re angry at how someone hurt you, you should avoid hurting them back.

Example:  
ถึงเขาจะพูดจาหยาบคายใส่เรา แต่เราต้องไม่พูดจาหยาบคายกลับไป หมากัดอย่ากัดตอบ
thǔeng-khǎo-jà-phûut-jaa-yàap-khaai-sài-rao dtàae-rao-dtâawng-mâi-phûut-jaa-yàap-khaai-glàp-bpai mǎa-gàt-yàa-gàt-dtàawp
Although he talked to us rudely, we must not speak rudely back. Don’t do bad things in order to fight back against bad people.

18 – กินบนเรือนขี้บนหลังคา

  • Pronunciation: gin-bon-ruuean-khîi-bon-lǎng-khaa
  • Literal translation: Eat in the house and then poop on the roof.
  • Close English proverb: Don’t bite the hand that feeds you.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb refers to a situation where someone is being unthankful and doing harm to people who are good to them and have helped them before. It encourages us to be thankful to parents, teachers, and our benefactors.

Example:  
คนที่กินบนเรือนขี้ยนหลังคาเป็นคนที่คบไม่ได้
khon-thîi-gin-bon-ruuean-khîi-bon-lǎng-khaa-bpen-khon-thîi-khóp-mâi-dâai
People who are unthankful and doing harm to people who are good to them shouldn’t be associated with.

19 – สาวไส้ให้กากิน

  • Pronunciation: sǎao-sâi-hâi-gaa-gin
  • Literal translation: Pull the intestine out for the crow to eat.
  • Close English proverb: Don’t wash dirty linen in public

Explanation:  
This saying refers to a situation where someone reveals a bad secret concerning family or friends to others. You shouldn’t tell secrets (bad things) about people who are close to you.

Example:  
เรื่องทะเลาะกันของพี่น้อง อย่าเล่าให้คนอื่นฟัง จะเป็นการสาวไส้ให้กากิน
rûueang-thá-láw-gan-khǎawng-phîi-náawng yàa-lâo-hâi-khon-ùuen-fang jà-bpen-gaan-sǎao-sâi-hâi- gaa-gin
You shouldn’t tell others about a fight between siblings. It’s like revealing bad things about your family to others.

20 – หาเหาใส่หัว / แกว่งเท้าหาเสี้ยน

  • Pronunciation: hǎa-hǎo-sài-hǔa / gwàaeng-tháo-hǎa-sîian
  • Literal translation: Find the louse and put it on the head. / Sway your feet for the bur.
  • Close English proverb: Let a sleeping dog lie.

Explanation:  
Both of these Thai proverbs encourage us not to interfere in a situation that’s already good enough, because it can lead to more problems.

Example 1:  
รู้ก็รู้ว่าเพื่อนทำผิด ยังจะไปช่วยอีก หาเหาใส่หัวชัด ๆ
rúu-gâaw-rúu-wâa-phûuean-tham-phìt yang-jà-bpai-chûuay-ìik hǎa-hǎo-sài-hǔua-chát-chát
You know that your friend did a bad thing but you still helped him. You just found yourself a problem.

Example 2:  
อย่าแกว่งเท้าหาเสี้ยนเลย แม่ขอร้อง
yàa-gwàaeng-tháo-hǎa-sîian-looei mâae-khǎaw-ráawng
[mother speaking to her children] I beg you, don’t do things that will bring problems.

21 – วัวหายล้อมคอก

  • Pronunciation: wuua-hǎai-láawm-khâawk
  • Literal translation: Making a stall after the cow is lost
  • Close English proverb: Locking the stable door after the horse is stolen

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that you shouldn’t wait to take action until after the problem arises, because it’s then useless. You should rather prevent the problem from happening in the first place. There’s no point in taking preventative measures afterward, because you can’t bring back what you already lost.

Example:  
ผมว่าหน้าต่างบ้านคุณดูไม่แข็งแรงเลย น่าจะเปลี่ยนใหม่นะ อย่ารอจนวัวหายแล้วค่อยล้อมคอก
phǒm-wâa-nâa-dtâang-bâan-khun-duu-mâi-khǎaeng-raaeng-looei nâa-jàa-bplìian-mài-ná yàa- raaw-jon-wuua-hǎai-láaeo-khâauy-láawm-khâawk
I don’t think your window is in good condition. You better change it. Don’t wait until the damage is already done to take some action.

22 – จับปลาสองมือ

  • Pronunciation: jàp-bplaa-sǎawng-muue
  • Literal translation: Catch fish with one hand at the same time
  • Close English proverb: He who hunts two hares, leaves one and loses another.

Explanation:  
Doing two difficult things at the same time will lead to failure in both. Imagine how hard it would be to catch a fish in each hand at the same time! Instead, we should focus on doing one thing at a time.

Example:  
จะทำอะไรก็เลือกเอาสักอย่าง อย่าจับปลาสองมือ
jà-tham-à-rai-gâaw-lûueak-ao-sák-yàang yàa-jàp-bplaa-sǎawng-muue
Choose one thing that you want to do. Don’t try to do two difficult things at the same time.

23 – ตีตนไปก่อนไข้

  • Pronunciation: dtii-dton-bpai-gàawn-khâi
  • Literal translation: Think that you have a fever before you actually have a fever
  • Close English proverb: Don’t cross the bridge until you come to it.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb refers to a situation where someone is fearful or worried about something that hasn’t happened yet. It encourages us not to worry too much about problems that haven’t happened yet. In the end, that problem may not happen at all!

Example:  
ยังไม่เกิดปัญหาอะไร อย่าเพิ่งตีต้นไปก่อนไข้ จะปวดหัวเปล่า ๆ
yang-mâi-gôoet-bpan-hǎa-à-rai yàa-phôoeng-dtii-dton-bpai-gàawn-khâi jà-bpùuat-hǔua-bplào-bplào
There’s no problem yet. Don’t worry about things that haven’t happened yet. You’ll have a headache for nothing.

24 – กำแพงมีหู ประตูมีช่อง

  • Pronunciation: gam-phaaeng-mii-hǔu bprà-dtuu-mii-châawng
  • Literal translation: Walls have ears. Doors have holes.
  • Close English proverb: The walls have ears.

Explanation:  
When talking about a secret, you have to be very careful because people may overhear and reveal it to others. Even if you’re in a room with the door closed, there may be people outside trying to eavesdrop.

Example:  
จะพูดอะไรให้ระวังหน่อย กำแพงมีหู ประตูมีช่อง
jà-phûut-à-rai-hâi-rá-wang-nàauy gam-phaaeng-mii-hǔu bprà-dtuu-mii-châawng
Be careful when speaking. People may hear your secret and reveal it to others.

Be Careful When Speaking; Walls Have Ears

25 – เอาไม้ซีกไปงัดไม้ซุง

Pronunciation: ao-máai-sîik-bpai-ngát-máai-sung

Literal translation: Use a thin stick of wood to wedge a log

Explanation:  
If you fight or disagree with people who have more power, there’s a good chance you’re going to lose. This proverb encourages us to choose our fights carefully.

Example:  
ตัวเล็กแค่นี้ ยังไปท้าต่อยตีกับเค้า เอาไม้ซีกไปงัดไม้ซุงแท้ ๆ
dtuua-lék-khâae-níi yang-bpai-tháa-dtàauy-dtii-gàp-kháo ao-máai-sîik-bpai-ngát-máai-sung-tháae-tháae
You’re this small but still pick a fight with others. You’re going to lose as you fight with bigger people.

Don’t Fight People Who Are Bigger Than You

26 – กวนน้ำให้ขุ่น

  • Pronunciation: guuan-nám-hâi-khùn
  • Literal translation: Stir the water, making it muddy

Explanation:  
This proverb refers to a situation where things are about to become good again, but someone ruins it. It’s often used when someone is about to forget about a bad thing that happened, but someone does something to remind them of it again.

Example:  
พ่อกำลังจะลืมอยู่แล้ว จะพูดขึ้นมาเพื่อกวนน้ำให้ขุ่นทำไม เดี๋ยวพ่อก็โกรธอีก
phâaw-gam-lang-jà-luuem-yùu-láaeo jà-phûut-khûen-maa-phûuea-guuan-nám-hâi-khùn-ìik-tham-mai dîiao-phâaw-gâaw-gròot-ìik
Dad is about to forget. Why do you speak about it to make him remember? He will get angry again.

27 – กบเลือกนาย

  • Pronunciation: gòp-lûueak-naai
  • Literal translation: Frog chooses boss.

Explanation:
If you’re too choosy, you may end up making a bad decision in the end. This proverb aims to teach people that it’s good to consider your options, but you shouldn’t overdo it.

Example:  
อย่าทำตัวเป็นกบเลือกนายหน่อยเลย เลือกเอาจากตัวเลือกที่มีก็พอ
yàa-tham-dtuua-bpen-gòp-lûueak-naai-nàauy-looei lûueak-ao-jàak-dtuua-lûueak-thîi-mii-gâaw- phaaw
Don’t be too choosy or else you may end up with the bad choice in the end. Just choose from the options you have.

28 – ขี่ช้างจับตั๊กแตน 

Pronunciation: khìi-cháang-jàp-dták-gà-dtaaen

Literal translation: Ride the elephant to catch the grasshoppers

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb refers to a situation where you invest a lot but only get a small return. It warns us to be careful with our investments so that we don’t end up losing out in the end.

Example:  
คิดยังไงถึงจะลงทุนซื้อรถคันใหม่เพื่อไปส่งของแค่ไม่กี่ครั้ง ขี่ช้างจับตั๊กแตนชัด ๆ
Khít-yang-ngai-thǔeng-jà-long-thun-súue-rót-khan-mài-phûuea-bpai-sòng-khǎawng-khâae-mâi-gìi- khráng khìi-cháang-jàp-dták-gà-dtaaen-chát-chát
What are you thinking? Buying a new car to deliver packages for a few times. You’re investing a lot for a small return.

29 – ชี้โพรงให้กระรอก

  • Pronunciation: chíi-phroong-hâi-grà-râawk
  • Literal translation: Point cavity for squirrel

Explanation:  
This proverb encourages us to be careful about the things we say, because we may unintentionally invite others to do something bad. For example, someone may say that the window of her house is broken and she is afraid a thief may come in that way. People who are in need of money may overhear what she said and decide to break into her house to steal.

Example:  
จะพูดอะไรต้องระวัง เดี๋ยวจะเป็นการชี้โพรงให้กระรอกเสียเปล่า ๆ
jà-phûut-à-rai-dtâawng-rá-wang dǐiao-jà-bpen-gaan-chíi-phroong-hâi-grà-râawk-sǐia-bplào-bplào
You have to be careful when speaking or else you may unintentionally advise someone to do bad things.

30 – อย่าไว้ใจทาง อย่าวางใจคน จะจนใจเอง

  • Pronunciation: yàa-wái-jai-thaang yàa-waang-jai-khon jà-jon-jai-eeng
  • Literal translation: Don’t trust the way, and don’t trust people or else you will be in trouble.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb warns us against trusting people too easily, because doing so can cause us trouble in the long run.

Example:  
ถึงแม้ว่าเพื่อนของเธอจะแนะนำ แต่เธอก็ต้องดูรายละเอียดของบริการเองด้วย อย่าไว้ใจทาง อย่าวางใจคน จะจนใจเองนะ
thǔeng-máae-wâa-phûuean-khǎawng-thooe-jà-náe-nam dtàae-thooe-gâaw-dtâawng-duu-raai-lá-ìiat- khǎawng-baaw-rí-gaan-eeng-dûuai yàa-wái-jai-thaang yàa-waang-jai-khon jà-jon-jai-eeng
Even though it was recommended by your friend, you still have to look at the service details. Don’t trust people easily.

5. Conclusion

In this article, you learned thirty of the most common Thai proverbs, what they mean, and how to use them. How many of them can you relate to? And are there similar proverbs in your language? 

If you enjoyed this lesson, we recommend continuing to explore ThaiPod101.com. We provide tons of fun and informative lessons from native speakers, free vocabulary lists, an online dictionary, and much more. Here’s just a sample of what you can expect: 

Happy learning!

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Common English Words in Thai: Do You Know Tinglish?

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Because English is a global language, it’s only natural that it would influence and be used in other languages, including Thai. If you know anything about Thai culture or have lived in Thailand for any amount of time, you’ll know that Thai people are very open-minded concerning outside influences. For this reason, there are many English loanwords in the Thai language. 

However, this influence has not been heavily reciprocated, and you’ll be hard-pressed to find any Thai words used in English. 

In this article, we’ll introduce you to Tinglish (Thai+English), English loanwords in Thai, and more!

A Woman Reading a Book on the Bus

Let’s learn Tinglish and English loanwords!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Introduction to Tinglish
  2. English Loanwords Used in Thai
  3. How to Say These Names in Thai
  4. Conclusion

1. Introduction to Tinglish

As mentioned earlier, Thai people are pretty open-minded. They have been greatly influenced by foreigners in terms of food, clothing, and language. There is no clear evidence indicating how Tinglish became so popular, but a possible explanation is that some Thai people heard these English words used in a specific context and misunderstood the actual meanings. As a result, they began using these words incorrectly.

Although the pronunciation of Tinglish words is the same as (or very similar to) that of the original English words, you have to know their Thai meaning in order to communicate effectively with Thai people. 

To help you start strong, we’ve compiled several examples of Tinglish, or common English words used in Thai with different meanings. 

1 – Fit 

Thai word: ฟิต (fít)

English meaning: the perfect size

Thai meaning: too tight or too small 

Example:  
ชั้นใส่กระโปรงตัวนี้ไม่ได้แล้ว มันฟิตเกินไป ต้องลดความอ้วนแล้วหละ
chǎn-sài-grà-bproong-dtuua-níi-mài-dâi-láaeo man-fít-gooen-bpai dtôong-lót-khwaam-aûuan-láaeo-là
I can no longer wear this skirt. It is too tight. I have to go on a diet now.

2 – Check bill 

Thai word: เช็คบิล (chék-bin)

English meaning: In English, people use either “check” or “bill.”

Thai meaning: Thai people use both words together as เช็คบิล (chék-bin).

Example:  
เช็คบิลเลยค่ะ และอาหารที่เหลือนี่ห่อกลับบ้านนะคะ
chék-bin-looei-khà láe-aa-hǎan-thîi-lǔuea-nîi-hàaw-glàp-bâan-ná-khá
Bill, please. And pack this leftover food to take home.

A Man Asking for the Check at a Restaurant

Should I say “check bill” or “bill”?

3 – Intrend

Thai word: อินเทรนด์ (in-treen)

English meaning: There is no English meaning for this word, but it comes from the word “trend.”

Thai meaning: trendy

Example:  
ตอนนี้สีเขียวกำลังอินเทรนด์เลย
dtaawn-níi-sǐi-khǐiao-gam-lang-in-threen-looei
“Green” is very trendy now.

4 – Chill 

Thai word: ชิล (chin)

English meaning: cold

Thai meaning: chill out

Example:  
บรรยากาศดีมาก น่ามานั่งชิล
ban-yaa-gàat-dii-mâak nâa-maa-nâng-chin
The atmosphere is very good for chilling out.

5 – In 

Thai word: อิน (in)

English meaning: a preposition 

Thai meaning: being “into” something

Example:  
ตอนนี้แม่กำลังอินเรื่องการปลูกต้นไม้
dtaawn-níi-mâae-gam-lang-in-rûueang-gaan-bplùuk-dtôn-mái
Right now, mom is so into planting.

6 – Fitness 

Thai word: ฟิตเนส (fít-nèet)

English meaning: a term referring to being physically fit and healthy

Thai meaning: a fitness center or gym

Example:  
ฤดีไปออกกำลังกายที่ฟิตเนสทุกวัน
rúe-dii-bpai-àawk-gam-lang-gaai-thîi-fít-nèet-thúk-wan
Ruedee goes to the gym every day.

A Woman being Spotted on the Bench Press at the Gym

I go to the ‘gym,’ not the ‘fitness.’

7 – Over 

Thai word: โอเวอร์ (oo-vôoe)

English meaning: an adjective (Winter is almost over.) / a preposition (over the mountain) / an adverb (the puddle he jumped over) / a prefix (The light was overhead.)

Thai meaning: to exaggerate

Example:  
อย่าพูดจาโอเวอร์ไปหน่อยเลย
yàa-phûut-jaa-oo-vôoe-bpai-nàauy-looei
Don’t over exaggerate.

8 – Gay 

Thai word: เกย์ (gee)

English meaning: homosexual

Thai meaning: male homosexual

Explanation: While the English word can refer to both male and female homosexuals, the Thai word only refers to males.

Example:  
พัฒน์เป็นเกย์
phát-bpen-gee
Pat is gay.

9 – Wave

Thai word: เวฟ (wéep)

English meaning: sea wave / a hand gesture used for greeting

Thai meaning: to warm food or a drink in a microwave oven

Explanation: Thai people shorten the word “microwave” and use it as a verb.

Example:  
หลังจากนำออกจากตู้เย็น ให้เอาไปเวฟ 1 นาที
lǎng-jàak-nam-àawk-jàak-dtûu-yen hâi-aao-bpai-wéep-nùeng-naa-thi
Warm this in the microwave for 1 minute after taking it out from the fridge.

10 – Pretty 

Thai word: พริตตี้ (phrít-dtîi)

English meaning: beautiful or cute

Thai meaning: model

Example:  
พริตตี้ที่งานมอเตอร์โชว์สวยมาก
phrít-dtîi-thîi-ngaan-maaw-dtôoe-shoo-sǔuai-mâak
Models at the auto show are very beautiful.

2. English Loanwords Used in Thai 

คำทับศัพท์ (kham-tháp-sàp) means “English loanwords.” 

The difference between English loanwords in Thai and Tinglish is that loanwords retain their original English meaning. There are a lot of English words used in Thai, so we’ve prepared a list of the most common loanwords by category.

1 – Food

  • apple = แอบเปิ้ล (áep-bpôoen)
  • strawberry = สตอเบอร์รี่ (sà-dtraaw-booe-rîi)
  • blueberry = บลูเบอร์รี่ (bluu-booe-rîi)
  • berry = เบอร์รี่ (booe-rîi)
  • cherry = เชอร์รี่ (chooe-rîi)
  • kiwi = กีวี่ (gii-wîi)
  • soup = ซุป (súp)
  • hotdog = ฮ็อทดอก (hót-dòk)
  • burger = เบอร์เกอร์ (booe-gôoe)
  • french fries = เฟรนซ์ฟราย (frén-fraai)
  • macaroni = มักกะโรนี (mák-gà-roo-ni)
  • spaghetti = สปาเก็ตตี้ (sà-bpa-gét-dtîi)
  • pasta = พาสต้า (pháat-dtâa)
  • pie = พาย (phaai)
  • ham = แฮม (haaem)
  • carrot = แครอท (khee-ràawt)
  • broccoli = บล็อคโคลี่ (bláwk-khoo-lîi)
  • cheese = ชีส (chíit)
  • mustard = มัสตาร์ด (mát-dtàat)
  • mayonnaise = มายองเนส (maa-yaawng-néet)
  • barley = บาร์เลย์ (baa-lèe)
  • quinoa = คีนัว (khii-nuua)
  • almond = อัลมอนด์ (an-môn)
  • macadamia = แม็คคาเดเมีย (máek-khaa-dee-miia)
  • walnut = วอลนัท (waaw-nát)
  • jam = แยม (yaaem)
  • cake = เค้ก (khêek)
  • cookie = คุ้กกี้ (khúk-gîi)
  • chocolate = ช็อคโกแล็ต (chók-goo-láaet)
  • vanilla = วะนิลา (vá-ní-laa)
  • sauce = ซอส (sáawt)
  • toffee = ท็อฟฟี่ (thóp-fîi)
  • ice cream = ไอศครีม (ai-sà-khriim)
  • soda = โซดา (soo-daa)
  • rum = รัม (ram)
  • brandy = บรั่นดี (bràn-dii)
  • whiskey = วิสกี้ (vít-gîi)
  • beer = เบียร์ (biia)

An Image of Several Grains, Nuts, Fruits, and Veggies

There are many English loanwords related to food and drinks.

2 – Sports 

  • golf = กอล์ฟ (gáawp)
  • ball = บอล (baawn)
  • football = ฟุตบอล (fút-baawn)
  • basketball = บาสเก็ตบอล (báat-gêt-baawn)
  • tennis = เทนนิส (then-nít)
  • ski = สกี (sà-gii)
  • skateboard = สเก็ตบอร์ด (sà-gét-bàawt
  • bowling = โบว์ลิ่ง (boo-lîng)
  • captain = กัปตัน (gàp-dtan)
  • game = เกม (geem)
  • foul = ฟาวล์ (faao)

3 – Music 

  • piano = เปียโน (bpiia-noo)
  • guitar = กีตาร์ (gii-dtâa)
  • violin = ไวโอลิน (vai-oo-lin)
  • flute = ฟลุ๊ต (flút)
  • bass = เบส (bèet)
  • note = โน๊ต (nóot)
  • chord = คอร์ด (khàawt)
  • chorus = คอรัส (khaaw-rát)
  • microphone = ไมโครโฟน (mai-khroo-foon)
  • single = ซิงเกิล (sing-gôoen)
  • album = อัลบัม (an-la-bâm)
  • show = โชว์ (shoo)
  • concert = คอนเสิร์ต (khaawn-sòoet)

4 – Automobiles and Electronics

  • gear = เกียร์ (giia)
  • brake = เบรก (brèek)
  • bus = บัส (bàt)
  • tractor = แทรกเตอร์ (thráek-dtôoe)
  • taxi = แท็กซี่ (tháek-sîi)
  • technology = เทคโนโลยี (thék-noo-loo-yii)
  • computer = คอมพิวเตอร์ (khaawm-phíu-dtôoe)
  • notebook = โน๊ตบุ๊ค (nóot-búk)
  • keyboard = คีย์บอร์ด (khii-bàawt)
  • mouse = เมาส์ (máo)
  • plug = ปลั๊ก (bplák)
  • internet = อินเตอร์เน็ท (in-dtooe-nèt
  • website = เว็บไซต์ (wép-sái)
  • digital = ดิจิตอล (dí-gì-dtân)
  • update = อัพเดท (áp-dèet)

5 – Academics

  • graph = กราฟ (gráap)
  • quota = โควต้า (khoo-dtâa)
  • nuclear = นิวเคลียร์ (niu-kriia)
  • protein = โปรตีน (bproo-dtiin)
  • carbohydrate = คาร์โบไฮเดรต (khaa-boo-hai-drèet)
  • physic = ฟิสิกส์ (fí-sìk)
  • cell = เซลล์ (seen)
  • spore = สปอร์ (sà-bpoo)
  • course = คอร์ส (kháawt)
  • fossil = ฟอสซิล (fót-sîn)
  • thesis = ธีสิส (thii-sìt)
  • grade = เกรด (grèet)

6 – Clothes and Cosmetics 

  • bra = บรา (braa)
  • boxer shorts = บ็อกเซอร์ (bók-sôoe)
  • necktie = เน็คไท (nék-thai)
  • jeans = ยีนส์ (yiin)
  • dress = เดรส (dréet)
  • lipstick = ลิปสติก (líp-sà-dtìk)
  • eyeshadow = อายชาโดว์ (aai-shaa-dôo)
  • brush on = บรัชออน (bràt-aawn)
  • mascara = มาสคาร่า (máat-khaa-râa)
  • toner = โทนเนอร์ (thoon-nôoe)
  • moisturizer = มอยซ์เจอร์ไรเซอร์ (máauy-jooe-rái-sôoe)
  • lotion = โลชั่น (loo-chân)

7 – Places

  • office = ออฟฟิศ (áawp-fít)
  • clinic = คลีนิก (khlii-nìk)
  • resort = รีสอร์ท (rii-sàawt)
  • apartment = อพาร์ทเมนท์ (a-pháat-mén)
  • condominium = คอนโดมิเนียม (khon-doo-mí-nîiam)
  • club = คลับ (khlàp)
  • bar = บาร์ (baa)
  • farm = ฟาร์ม (faam)
  • lift = ลิฟท์ (líp)

8 – Animals 

  • giraffe = ยีราฟ (yii-ráap)
  • hippopotamus = ฮิปโปโปเตมัส (híp-bpoo-bpoo-dtee-mát)
  • koala = โคอาล่า (khoo-aa-lâa)
  • panda = แพนด้า (phaaen-dâa)
  • penguin = เพนกวิน (phen-gwîn)
  • dinosaur = ไดโนเสาร์ (dai-noo-sǎo)

A Mother Koala Bear with Its Baby

A lot of animal names in Thai are English loanwords.

9 – Health and Hospitals 

  • vitamin = วิตามิน (wi-dtaa-min)
  • vaccine = วัคซีน (wák-siin)
  • serum = เซรุ่ม (see-rûm)
  • virus = ไวรัส (wai-rát)
  • bacteria = แบคทีเรีย (bàaek-thii-riia)
  • X-ray = เอ็กซ์เรย์ (ék-sà-ree)
  • CT-scan = ซีทีแสกน (sii-thii-sà-gaaen)

10 – Verbs

  • copy = ก็อบปี้ (gáawp-bpîi)
  • click = คลิก (khlík)
  • cheer = เชียร์ (chiia)
  • charge = ชาร์จ (cháat)
  • check = เช็ค (chék)
  • shopping = ชอปปิ้ง (cháawp-bpîng)
  • print = ปรินท์ (bprín)

11 – Other English Loanwords in Thai 

  • plastic = พลาสติก (phláat-sà-dtìk)
  • gas = แก็ส (gáaet)
  • card = การ์ด (gáat)
  • cartoon = การ์ตูน (gaa-dtuun)
  • coupon = คูปอง (khuu-bpaawng)
  • guide = ไกด์ (gái)
  • tour = ทัวร์ (thuua)
  • queue = คิว (khiu)
  • spray = สเปร์ย (sà-phree)
  • spa = สปา (sà-bpaa)
  • TV = ทีวี (thii-wii)

3. How to Say These Names in Thai

In addition to คำทับศัพท์ (kham-tháp-sàp), or “loanwords,” there are many English words in the Thai language that derive directly from global brands or names. Like loanwords, these words have a different pronunciation in Thai. Read through this useful list we’ve compiled to get a better idea of how to pronounce global names in the Thai language! 

1 – Restaurant and Cafe Brands 

  • McDonald’s = แม็คโดนัล (máek-doo-nân)
  • KFC = เค เอฟ ซี (khee-éep-sii)
  • Burger King = เบอร์เกอร์ คิง (booe-gôoe-khing)
  • 7-Eleven = เซเว่น อีเลเว่น (see-wêen-ii-lee-wêen)
  • Family Mart = แฟมิลี่มาร์ท (faaem-mí-lîi-màat)
  • Starbucks = สตาร์บัค (sà-dtaa-bák)
  • Au Bon Pain = โอบองแปง (oo-baawng-bpaaeng)
  • Swensen = สเวนเซ่นส์ (sà-wên-sên)

2 – Entertainment-Related Names 

  • Marvel = มาร์เวล (maa-wêen)
  • Disney = ดิสนีย์ (dít-nîi)
  • Harry Potter = แฮร์รี่ พ็อตเตอร์ (haae-rîi-pháawt-dtôoe)
  • Lord of the Rings = ลอร์ด ออฟ เดอะ ริงส์ (làawt-áawp-dòe-ring)
  • Star Wars = สตาร์ วอร์ (sà-dtaa-waaw)
  • Iron Man = ไอรอนแมน (ai-râawn-maaen)
  • Captain America = กัปตันอเมริกา (gàp-dtan-à-mee-rí-gaa)
  • Hulk = ฮัค (hák)
  • Thor = ธอร์ (thaaw)
  • Black Widow = แบล็ควิโดว์ (bláaek-wí-dôo)
  • Hawkeye = ฮอร์คอาย (háawk-aai)
  • Spider-Man = สไปเดอร์แมน (sà-bpái-dôoe-maaen)
  • Antman = แอนท์แมน (áaen-maaen)
  • X-men = เอ็กซ์เมน (ék-meen)
  • Batman = แบทแมน (báaet-maaen)
  • Superman = ซุปเปอร์แมน (súp-phôoe-maaen)
  • Wonder Woman = วอนเดอร์วูแมน (wáawn-dôoe-wuu-mâaen)
  • Aquaman = อควาแมน (à-khwâa-maaen)
  • MIB = เอ็ม ไอ บี (em-ai-bii)
  • Transformers = ทรานซ์ฟอร์เมอร์ (thraan-faaw-môoe)
  • Toy Story = ทอยสตอรี่ (thaauy-sà-dtaaw-rîi)
  • Frozen = โฟรเซ่น (froo-sên)
  • Lion King = ไลออน คิงส์ (lai-âawn-king)
  • Mulan = มู่หลาน (mûu-lǎan)
  • Beauty and the Beast = บิวตี้ แอนด์ เดอะ บีสต์ (biu-dtîi-aaen-dòe-bìit)
  • Maleficent = มาลิฟิเซนต์ (ma-lí-fi-sén)

A Cartoon Drawing of Thor

Thor is ธอร์ in Thai.

3 – Singer and Band Names

  • Maroon 5 = มารูน ไฟฟ์ (maa-ruun-fái)
  • Linkin Park = ลินคิน พาร์ค (lin-khîn-pháak)
  • Black Eyed Peas = แบล็ค อาย พี (bláaek-aai-phii)
  • One Direction = วัน ไดเร็คชั่น (wan-dai-rék-chân)
  • The Pussycat Dolls = พุซซี่ แคทดอล (phút-sîi-kháet-daawn)
  • Fifth Harmony = ฟิฟ ฮาร์โมนี่ (fít-haa-moo-nîi)
  • Coldplay = โคล เพลย์ (khoo-phlee)
  • Beyonce = บียองเซ่ (bii-yaawng-sêe)
  • Taylor Swift = เทเลอร์ สวิฟต์ (thee-lôoe-sà-wíp)
  • Katy Perry = เคที่ เพร์รี (khee-thîi-phee-rîi)
  • Kanye = คานเย (khaan-yêe)
  • Snoop Dogg = สนูป ดอกซ์ (sà-núup-dáawk)
  • Jennifer Lopez = เจนนิเฟอร์ โลเปซ (jee-ní-fôoe-loo-phéet)
  • Mariah Carey = มาราย แครี่ (maa-raai-khee-rîi)
  • Charlie Puth = ชาร์ลี พุท (chaa-lii-phút)
  • Celine Dion = เซลีน ดีออน (see-riin-dii-aawn)
  • Nicki Minaj = นิคกี้ มินาจ (ník-gîi-míi-nàat)
  • Meghan Trainor = เมแกน เทรนเนอร์ (mee-gaaen-three-nôoe)
  • Justin Bieber = จัสติน บีเบอร์ (ját-thin-bii-bôoe)
  • Eminem = เอ็มมิเน็ม (em-mí-nem)
  • Selena Gomez = เซลาน่า โกเมซ (see-lee-nâa-goo-méet)
  • Bruno Mars = บรูโน่ มาร์ส (bluu-nôo-maa)

4 – Clothing Brands 

  • Victoria’s Secret = วิคตอเรีย ซีเคร็ท (wík-dtaaw-riia-sii-khrèt)
  • Playboy = เพลย์บอล (phlee-baauy)
  • H&M = เอช แอนด์ เอ็ม (éet-aaen-em)
  • Zara = ซาร่า (saa-râa)
  • Mango = แมงโก้ (maaeng-gôo)
  • Uniqlo = ยูนิโคล่ (uu-ní-khlôo)
  • Nike = ไนกี้ (nai-gîi)
  • Adidas = อาดิดาส (aa-di-dáat)
  • Puma = พูม่า (phuu-mâa)
  • Topshop = ท็อปช็อป (tháawp-chàawp)
  • Mark & Spencer = มาร์ค แอนด์ สเปนเซอร์ (máak-aaen-sà-phen-sôoe)
  • Flipflop = ฟิตฟลอป (fít-flàawp)
  • Birkenstock = เบอร์เก็นสต็อค (booe-gên-sà-dtáawk)

5 – Cosmetic Brands 

  • Mac = แม็ค (máek)
  • Benefit = เบเนฟิต (bee-nee-fìt)
  • Bobby Brown = บ็อบบี้ บราวน์ (bóp-bîi-braao)
  • Kiehl’s = คีลส์ (khiin)
  • L’oreal = ลอรีอัล (laaw-ríi-ân)
  • Maybelline = เมเบอร์ลีน (mee-booe-liin)
  • Clinique = คลีนิค (khlii-nìk)
  • Lamer = ลาแมร์ (laa-maae)

6 – Bag Brands 

  • Chanel = ชาแนล (chaa-naaen)
  • Coach = โค้ช (khóot)
  • Prada = ปราด้า (bpraa-dâa)
  • Kate Spade = เคท สเปซ (khéet-sà-bpéet)
  • Louis Vuitton = หลุยส์ วิคตอง (lǔi-vít-dtaawng)
  • Gucci = กุชชี่ (gút-chîi)

7 – Grocery Brands 

  • Unilever = ยูนิลีเวอร์ (uu-ní-lii-wôoe)
  • P&G = พี แอนด์ จี (phii-aaen-jii)
  • Nestle = เนสท์เล่ (néet-lêe)
  • Lion = ไลอ้อน (lai-âawn)

Conclusion

By now, you’ve learned many of the most popular English words in the Thai language. We bet you can remember most (if not all) of them, as they sound so similar to their English equivalents. Because Thai people use these words so often, memorizing them is an important step in your language learning journey. 

Were you surprised by any of the words on our list? Let us know in the comments, and feel free to list any more loanwords you know about! 

And as always, don’t forget to explore ThaiPod101.com to find more interesting lessons. Not sure where to start? Here are a few we think you’ll like: 

Happy learning, and have fun practicing your Tinglish!

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A Brief Thai Culture Overview

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If you’ve ever been to Thailand, you may have found yourself quickly becoming enthralled with the Thai culture. The culture of Thailand features some very distinct qualities that set it apart from Western culture. From the warm, friendly, and open smiles of its people to the national religion of Buddhism, Thailand will inspire any visitor to learn more about the Thai culture, people, and language. 

Before we dive in, how about a quick fun fact? There is a special Thai greeting called ไหว้ (wâi) that you won’t find in other cultures. To perform wai, hold your hands together and bring them up to just under your chin. Once your hands are in position, give a slight nod. Wai is the Thai equivalent of saying hello, goodbye, or any other greeting. 

Of course, there is much more to Thai culture that you should know. On this page, we’ll give you all the information you need to avoid Thai culture shock and learn more about Thai culture and traditions.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Values and Beliefs
  2. Philosophies and Religions
  3. Family and Work
  4. Art
  5. Food
  6. Traditional Holidays
  7. Conclusion

1. Values and Beliefs

A Thai Woman Performing a Traditional Dance

Let’s learn more about Thai culture and traditions.

To understand the behaviors and worldviews of Thai people, you need to be aware of the traditional Thai values and beliefs. There are two in particular that play a huge role in our daily lives. 

A- Social Hierarchy

Although Thailand has not been governed by an absolute monarchy for over a hundred years now, there is still a social hierarchy in the country. Thai people pay more respect to certain groups of people, such as the royal family and monks. Also, Thai people are taught to respect those who are older than themselves as well as their benefactors (parents, teachers, etc.). So don’t be surprised when you see the degree of respect shown in our interactions with elders and parents! 

B- Collectivism 

Thailand is often called “the land of smiles” because Thai people always seem to have a smile on their face. While it’s true that Thai people are friendly, visitors will be surprised to find out that a smile does not always equate to happiness. Different smiles can mean anything from pleasure to anger, and most of the time you won’t be aware of any negativity. This is because Thai culture values avoiding conflict and “saving face.” 

The reason behind this is that Thailand is a collectivist society. If you’re in Thailand long enough, you may start to notice that Thai people tend to go along with others when doing group activities. This is because Thai people want to be like others and remain as part of the group. As a result, they don’t dare to voice their opinions in front of others and prefer to compromise instead of really solving problems.    

2. Philosophies and Religions

In addition to smiles, Thailand is well-known for the Buddhist statues found all over the country. Buddhism is the national religion and over ninety percent of Thai people practice it. It’s common to see Buddhist monks in traditional robes walking just about everywhere you go. 

If you truly want to learn Thai, getting acquainted with the basics of Buddhism is not a bad idea. Of course, you don’t have to convert to Buddhism to master the language, but a good knowledge of the religion will go a long way toward understanding the country.

Someone Giving a Buddhist Monk Food Donations

Buddhism is the dominant religion in Thailand.

As you can guess, most Thai philosophies are influenced by Buddhism in one way or another. However, modern Thai culture is one of diversity. As Thai people are quite open-minded, they are also influenced by other religions and beliefs to some extent.  

Because there are many Thai-Chinese in Thai society, there are many practices influenced by Taoism and Confucianism. One example of this is the Vegetarian Festival, which is celebrated during October each year. This popular food festival is mainly celebrated by the Thai-Chinese, though the rest of the population also gets in on the action. Another Thai-Chinese custom is เชงเม้ง (cheeng-méng), when they pay respect to deceased ancestors. 

3. Family and Work

Family and work are integral aspects of society, no matter where you are in the world. In this section, we’ll discuss the essential features of Thai workplace culture and the Thai family. 

A- Family

The Thai culture is very family-oriented. In the past, it was common for Thai people to have large families.  Grandparents got to see their grandchildren, nieces, and nephews on a daily basis, as family members all lived in the same area.

Of course, things have changed over time. While you may see this type of big family in the countryside, it’s not very common in urban areas. Still, Thai families share a strong bond. Despite not living in the same area, family members often meet with each other or communicate via other means. This Thai value has played a large role in shaping the modern Thai society. The importance of family in Thai culture is also reflected in the various Thai words used for family members.

The concept of ความกตัญญู (khwaam-gà-than-yuu), or “gratitude,” is another thing that reflects Thailand’s family-oriented society. Because our parents raised us, it’s very important to take care of them when we grow up. Thus, Thai people won’t send their elderly parents to care centers unless they’re really sick. Doing so would mean that they don’t care for them.

Now let’s discuss a final point about family: marriage. In the past, men could have many wives but nowadays Thai people only practice monogamy. Despite this step forward, there are still some cultural elements that reflect gender inequality. For example, Thai women are pressured to get married earlier than men. While it’s fine for a man to be single in his thirties, this is not the case for women. On the other hand, a man has to pay a ‘bride price’ to a woman’s parents in order to marry her.

B- Work

Thai people are chill by nature and love to have fun. To some extent, this characteristic is reflected in the business world as well. If you ever decide to work in Thailand, you’ll find that Thai people aren’t very punctual in their work. Also, the work atmosphere tends to be less stressful than those in other countries.

Most Thai people work solely to make a living, not to do things they love or are passionate about. The Patronage system, which was a prominent feature in how Thailand was once governed, also plays a role in our work environment.

4. Art

Several aspects of the Thai culture and heritage feature heavily in our artwork, with many of our most popular paintings and sculptures having roots in Buddhism. For example, you can find various paintings of Buddhist stories in the temples and Buddha statues are viewed as an artform as well as a religious symbol. 

Thailand is also home to several impressive architectural feats, most notably our temples. In the past, temples were not only places for practicing religion, but they also served as the royal family’s palace. Because the temples in Thailand reflect this aspect of history, their extreme beauty should come as no surprise.

A Temple in Bangkok, Thailand

Beautiful Thai architecture

Earthenware is another outstanding Thai artform. While temples are related to religion, this type of art is more ordinary in nature. A famous type of earthenware is called “celadon ware,” or เครื่องสังคโลก (khrûueng-sǎng-khá-lôok). It originated in Sukhothai province during the Sukhothai Era.

As for literature, Thailand is known for its poetry. There are various types of poems written in the Thai language, many of which focus on storytelling. These poetic ‘stories’ are diverse, covering a range of genres from religion and fantasy to love and food.

Thailand boasts a range of musical instruments and styles. In Thai culture, music is a huge part of daily life and is also incorporated into special events. For example, Thai people like to sing a song called เพลงรำวงเกี่ยวข้าว (phleeng-ram-wong-gìiao-khâao), or “Harvest Song,” during the harvest. This is also a great example of their fun-loving nature, as they love to sing and dance even during work.

5. Food

Nowadays, Thailand is well-known for two things: its beautiful travel destinations and its delicious cuisine. Indeed, Thai food and culture go hand in hand. There’s even a special Thai phrase that ties into this topic:

  • ในน้ำมีปลา ในนามีข้าว” (nai-nám-mii-bplaa nai-naa-mii-khâao)

Literally meaning, “There are fish in the water and rice in the rice field,” this saying has been used since the Sukhothai Era to describe Thailand’s natural richness. From the past until now, Thailand has never lacked food. If you visit Thailand, you’ll be able to find food 24/7.  

Thai cuisine is known for its use of herbs and deep flavors, as well as its beautiful and colorful presentations. As mentioned earlier, Thai people are quite open-minded. This means you’ll find many Thai food items that have been influenced by foreign cuisines. For example, Thai sweets that use egg as an ingredient are the result of Portuguese influence.

Orange Curry, a Popular Thai Dish

Thai food is tasty and full of herbs.

6. Traditional Holidays

When it comes to traditional Thai holidays, there are two that stand out from the rest: วันสงกรานต์ (wan-sǒng-graan) and วันลอยกระทง (wan-laauy-grà-thong). 

A- วันสงกรานต์ (wan-sǒng-graan)

วันสงกรานต์ (wan-sǒng-graan), or the Thai New Year, takes place from April 13 to April 15 each year. During this holiday, Thai people go back to their hometown to visit their parents or travel with family

Popular วันสงกรานต์ (wan-sǒng-graan) activities include visiting temples to make merit and building pagodas made of sand and flowers. Thai people also รดน้ำดำหัวผู้ใหญ่ (rót-nám-dam-hǔua-phûu-yài), which is an activity to show one’s gratitude, ask for forgiveness, and get a blessing from one’s parents or grandparents. 

These activities clearly reflect the family-oriented society of Thailand.

Thai Water Sprinkling for Songkran Festival

รดน้ำดำหัวผู้ใหญ่ [rót-nám-dam-hǔua-phûu-yài]

In addition to the activities above, Thai people also play with water during this period. This is because วันสงกรานต์ (wan-sǒng-graan) is not only the solar new year, but also the hottest time of the year. Family gatherings and water games make วันสงกรานต์ (wan-sǒng-graan) a colorful holiday that foreigners and natives alike look forward to.

B- วันลอยกระทง (wan-laauy-grà-thong)

The history of วันลอยกระทง (wan-laauy-grà-thong) dates back to the Sukhothai Era. On this day, Thai people engage in certain activities to ask forgiveness from พระแม่คงคา (phrá-mâae-khong-khaa), the goddess of rivers. Thai people make กระทง (grà-thong), or “lotus-shaped boats,” from banana tree leaves and flowers and float them down the river.  

Nowadays, วันลอยกระทง (wan-laauy-grà-thong) is one of the most popular holidays in Thailand. There are many activities you can do on this day: observe the beautiful scenery at night, see women dressed in traditional Thai clothing, experience the beauty of Thai dancing, and much more.

Lotus-shaped Boats with Candles Floating Down the River for Loy Krathong

Let’s ลอยกระทง [laauy-grà-thong].

7. Conclusion

Learning about Thai culture and society is a good way to complement your language studies. In doing so, you’ll gain a deep appreciation for the language, and may even be inspired to take your studies further. 

If you’re looking for a language course, our Thai podcast lessons and other learning materials may be just what you need. At ThaiPod101.com, we understand that busy individuals may find it hard to fit study time into their hectic schedules. That’s why we offer additional tools—such as themed vocabulary lists and a Thai-English dictionary—to help you learn Thai more quickly. In addition, you’ll find a number of articles related to Thai culture topics such as traditional clothing, history, and food. In short, we make learning Thai easy and fun!

Actually, the language itself is a great representation of Thai culture and values. In each of our lessons, we combine grammar and vocabulary points with practical cultural information. To get a taste of our teaching approach, create your free lifetime account today and check out our lessons for yourself. Our content will prepare you both linguistically and culturally for a range of daily situations, from talking about your pets or discussing your hobbies to planning a date

Before you go, let us know in the comments how Thai culture compares to that in your country. We look forward to hearing from you!

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The Best Thai Foods You Need To Try

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Thai food ranks among the most popular cuisines worldwide. Why? 

Well, authentic Thai food is very appealing in terms of taste, smell, and appearance. In fact, most dishes are colorful and presented with an artistic flair. And if you come to Thailand, you might be surprised to learn that you can find food, snacks, and drinks 24/7—and not just in convenience stores!

Because a country’s food is a major component of its culture, trying Thai food is a special experience for foreigners who visit Thailand.

In this article, we’ll present you with tons of practical Thai cuisine information. This includes…

  • …the top five Thai foods to try in restaurants
  • …several unique Thai foods only found in-country
  • …a few foods you may question are actually Thai
  • …practical food-related vocabulary

As a bonus, ThaiPod101.com will also give you some easy Thai food recipes you can make at home.

If you want more information on Thai cuisine, you can check out the following lessons on ThaiPod101.com:


Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Let's Cook in Thai Table of Contents
  1. 5 Must-Try Thai Dishes
  2. Unique Thai Foods
  3. Are These Food and Snack Items Thai?
  4. Vocabulary for Food and the Restaurant
  5. Bonus: Simple Thai Recipes
  6. Conclusion

1. 5 Must-Try Thai Dishes

When visiting a Thai restaurant—whether in-country or abroad—it can be hard to know what Thai food to order. To help you out, we’ve handpicked five of the best Thai dishes you should definitely try! 

ส้มตำไทย (sôm-dtam-thai) – Papaya Salad

Ingredients:  

  • มะละกอ (má-lá-gaaw) = papaya
  • ถั่วฝักยาว (thùua-fàk-yaao) = cowpea
  • มะเขือเทศ (má-khǔuea-thêet) = tomato
  • ถั่วลิสง (thùua-lí-sǒng) = peanut
  • กุ้งแห้ง (gûng-hâaeng) = dried shrimp
  • พริก (phrík) = chili
  • กระเทียม (grà-thiiam) = garlic
  • น้ำตาลปี๊บ (nám-dtaan-bpiíp) = palm sugar
  • มะนาว (má-naao) = lime
  • น้ำปลา (nám-bplaa) = fish sauce

ส้มตำ (sôm-dtam) is an iconic Thai food, making it perfect for you to try as a language learner. 

ส้มตำไทย (sôm-dtam-thai) is just one type of ส้มตำ (sôm-dtam), and we recommend you try this one first if you’ve never had this before. There are other types that contain small raw crab and pickled fish sauce, but that may be a bit much for your first time. 

Basically, ส้มตำ (sôm-dtam) is raw vegetables mixed together with peanuts and dried shrimp. The vegetables offer a fresh taste and the dish has sweet, sour, and salty flavors. 

I Love Sôm-dtam-thai

ผัดไทย (phàt-thai) – Thai-Style Fried Noodles

Ingredients:  

  • เส้นจันทน์ (sên-jan) = a type of noodle
  • เต้าหู้เหลือง (dtâo-hûu-lùueang) = yellow tofu
  • กุยช่าย (gui-châai) = Chinese chive
  • ถั่วงอก (thùua-ngâawk) = bean sprout
  • หอมแดง (hǎawm-daaeng) = shallot
  • กุ้งแห้ง (gûng-hâaeng) = dried shrimp
  • ไช้โป๊ว (chái-bpóo) = salted turnip
  • ถั่วลิสงบด (thùua-lí-sǒng-bòt) = crushed peanut
  • ไข่ (khài) = egg
  • น้ำมัน (nám-man) = cooking oil
  • พริกป่น (phrík-bpòn) = chili powder
  • กระเทียม (grà-thiiam) = garlic
  • น้ำตาลปี๊บ (nám-dtaan-bpiíp) = palm sugar
  • น้ำมะขามเปียก (nám-má-khǎam-bpìiak) = tamarind juice
  • น้ำปลา (nám-bplaa) = fish sauce

If you were to speak of a noodle dish in Japan, it would be Ramen. But Thailand’s famous noodle dish is ผัดไทย (phàt-thai).

Here’s some Thai food history for you: During World War II, the Thai leader Plaek Phibunsongkhram wanted to create a sense of nationalism in the country. He did this by encouraging people to create a unique Thai dish, which turned out to be ผัดไทย (phàt-thai).  

This has become one of the most popular Thai cuisine dishes among native Thai people and foreigners alike. It  tastes sweet and sour, and the noodle itself is pretty chewy. 

Phàt-thai Is Delicious

แกงเขียวหวาน (gaaeng-khǐiao-wǎan) – Green Curry

Ingredients:  

  • พริกแกงเขียวหวาน (phrík-gaaeng-khǐiao-wǎan) = green curry paste
  • ไก่ (gài) = chicken
  • มะเขือเปราะ (má-khǔuea-bpràw) = green brinjal
  • มะเขือพวง (má-khǔuea-phuuang) = turkey berry
  • พริกชี้ฟ้า (phrík-chíi-fáa) = cayenne pepper
  • ใบมะกรูด (bai-má-grùut) = leaf of kaffir lime
  • ใบโหระพา (bai-hǒo-rá-phaa) = basil
  • กะทิ (gà-thí) = coconut milk
  • น้ำตาลปี๊บ (nám-dtaan-bpiíp) = palm sugar
  • น้ำปลา (nám-bplaa) = fish sauce

There are various types of curry in Thailand, and แกงเขียวหวาน (gaaeng-khǐiao-wǎan) is one of the most popular.  

It’s a main dish often served with rice or rice noodles. In some recipes, chicken is substituted with other protein sources such as fish or beef. Despite having the word หวาน (wǎan), or “sweet,” in its name, แกงเขียวหวาน (gaaeng-khǐiao-wǎan) does not taste sweet. It’s also not as spicy as other curries, which is why we recommend it to foreigners.

Let’s Try Gaaeng-khǐiao-wǎan

ต้มข่าไก่ (dtôm-khàa-gài) – Chicken in Coconut Milk Soup

Ingredients: 

  • พริกแกงเขียวหวาน (phrík-gaaeng-khǐiao-wǎan) = green curry paste
  • ไก่ (gài) = chicken
  • เห็ดฟาง (hèd-faang) = straw mushroom
  • พริกชี้ฟ้า (phrík-chíi-fáa) = cayenne pepper
  • ข่า (khàa) = galangal
  • ตะไคร้ (dtà-khrái) = lemon grass
  • ใบมะกรูด (bai-má-grùut) = leaf of kaffir lime
  • น้ำซุปไก่ (nám-súp-gài) = chicken broth
  • กะทิ (gà-thí) = coconut milk
  • มะนาว (má-naao) = lime
  • น้ำปลา (nám-bplaa) = fish sauce

Another great choice for foreigners is ต้มข่าไก่ (dtôm-khàa-gài). It’s similar to ต้มยำ (dtôm-yam) but has a smoother taste and is less spicy, making it perfect for those who can’t handle spicy foods. It also tastes lighter and healthier than curry. During the vegetarian season, you can find a vegan version of this dish as well.

หมูสะเต๊ะ (mǔu-sà-dté) – Grilled Pork Stick with Turmeric

Ingredients:  

  • พริกแกงเขียวหวาน (phrík-gaaeng-khǐiao-wǎan) = green curry paste
  • หมู (mǔu) = pork
  • กระเทียม (grà-thiiam) = garlic
  • ผงขมิ้น (phǒng-khà-mîn) = turmeric powder
  • ผงยี่หร่า (phǒng-yîi-hràa) = cumin powder
  • ผงกะหรี่ (phǒng-gà-hrìi) = curry powder
  • เมล็ดผักชี (mà-lét-phàk-chii) = coriander seeds
  • น้ำตาลทราย (nám-dtaan-sai) = sugar
  • กะทิ (gà-thí) = coconut milk
  • นมสด (nom-sòt) = milk

One of the most popular Thai street foods you should try is หมูสะเต๊ะ (mǔu-sà-dté). 

This is a chewy, salty appetizer served with a savory, nutty dipping sauce. The most common protein for this snack is pork, but you can sometimes find chicken or lamb as well. Thai people eat หมูสะเต๊ะ (mǔu-sà-dté) with toast.

2. Unique Thai Foods

In this section, we’ll present you with some unique Thai foods and desserts. You may find some of the food combinations weird, but they taste really good!

ข้าวแช่

The weather in Thailand is hot all year. Some people even joke that Thailand has three seasons: hot, hotter, and hottest. To cope with the weather in summer, Thai people created ข้าวแช่ (khâao-châae).  

This dish consists of cooked rice soaked in flower-scented water. It’s eaten with various side dishes, such as shredded pork, salted turnip fried with egg, or stuffed bell peppers. It tastes very fresh and has a nice fragrance. You can find this cuisine item in Thai restaurants during the summer. 

น้ำจิ้มซีฟู้ด

น้ำจิ้มซีฟู้ด (nám-jîm-sii-fúut) is a special dipping sauce. There are various recipes for this dipping sauce, but it’s typically made with chili, garlic, coriander root, fish sauce, lime juice, and salt. Originally, Thai people dipped seafood in it. But today, it’s currently served with various foods, such as hot pot, crab fried rice, and steamed fish ball. 

ข้าวเหนียวมะม่วง

ข้าวเหนียวมะม่วง (khâao-nǐiao-má-mûuang) is a famous Thai dessert. Thai people eat this sweet and salty rice with ripe mango (and sometimes durian) topped with coconut milk. You can find this Thai dessert in summer, which is mango season.  

Some foreigners may find it weird to eat rice with fruit, but the flavor of sticky rice goes well with ripe mango and coconut milk. However, we have to warn you that this isn’t a very healthy Thai food, so you shouldn’t eat it too often.

3. Are These Food and Snack Items Thai?

Thai people are very open-minded when it comes to food. If you visit Thailand, you’ll see that there are various dishes, snacks, and desserts influenced by foreign food. Some of them have been adapted to suit Thai tastes and preferences. 

If you were to find these Thai food names on a menu, you might wonder if they’re really Thai! Let’s take a closer look.

ขนมโตเกียว

ขนมโตเกียว (khà-nǒm-dtoo-giiao) is a popular Thai snack. It’s a pancake roll with various savory and sweet fillings, such as ham, sausage, egg, taro paste, and custard. 

The name of this snack breaks down into two words: 

  • ขนม (khà-nǒm) – snack
  • โตเกียว (dtoo-giiao) – the name of a city in Japan

Because of its name, many people mistakenly think that this snack was influenced by Japanese cuisine.

The origin of ขนมโตเกียว (khà-nǒm-dtoo-giiao) is unclear. Some say it was influenced by a Japanese dessert called Dorayaki, while most people believe this snack was first sold in the first Japanese department store in Thailand: Daimaru. However, it was created by Thai people and named ขนมโตเกียว (khà-nǒm-dtoo-giiao) to make it sound Japanese.

Is This a Thai Snack?

ลอดช่องสิงคโปร์

ลอดช่องสิงคโปร์ (lâawt-châawng-sǐng-khà-bphoo) is a Thai snack made with tapioca flour and sweet coconut milk. 

This is another food item with a rather confusing name. Its two parts break down as:

  • ลอดช่อง (lâawt-châawng) – the name of a similar Thai dessert
  • สิงคโปร์ (sǐng-khà-bphoo) – Singapore

ลอดช่องสิงคโปร์ (lâawt-châawng-sǐng-khà-bphoo) is not a dessert imported from Singapore. It was created by a restaurant called สิงคโปร์โภชนา (sǐng-khà-bphoo-phoo-chá-na), which is located in เยาวราช (yao-wá-râat), the famous Chinatown in Bangkok.

ข้าวผัดอเมริกัน

Are you seeing a trend here? Let’s break down the name of this confusing Thai dish:

  • ข้าวผัด (khâao-phàat) – fried rice
  • อเมริกัน (a-mee-rí-gan) – American

Despite having ‘American’ in its name, ข้าวผัดอเมริกัน (khâao-phàat-a-mee-rí-gan) was created by Thai people.  ข้าวผัดอเมริกัน (khâao-phàat-a-mee-rí-gan) is rice fried with ketchup, ham, sausage, fried egg, and salad. The dish is said to have been influenced by the American-style breakfast: toast, fried egg, ham, and sausage eaten with ketchup.  

กล้วยแขก

กล้วยแขก (glûuai-khàaek) is fried banana, and this snack dates back to the Ayutthaya Period.

The name of this dish breaks down to:

  • กล้วย (glûuai) – banana
  • แขก (khàaek) – Indian

Apart from referring to Indian people, แขก (khàaek) was traditionally used to mean “strange” or “foreign” as well. Fried banana is quite different from the other snacks of that time, so it was called กล้วยแขก to imply that it was a ‘strange’ dessert made from banana.

ขนมจีน

The name of our last confusing food item breaks down as:

  • ขนม (khà-nǒm) – snack
  • จีน (jiin) – China

Despite its name, ขนมจีน (khà-nǒm-jiin) is not a snack and it was not imported from or influenced by China. It’s actually “rice noodle,” a food influenced from Mon food called kha-naawm-jin.

Thai people eat ขนมจีน (khà-nǒm-jiin) with various savory foods, such as curry, ส้มตำ (sôm-dtam), noodles, and spicy salad.  

4. Vocabulary for Food and the Restaurant

Now you know all about the most popular Thai food dishes. That means you’re ready to learn some practical Thai vocabulary for talking about (and ordering) food. Let’s go!

A- Food-Related Vocabulary

We’ll start with some useful words about Thai food for beginners. 

Taste

  • อร่อย (a-ràauy) = delicious
  • จืด (jùuet) = plain
  • เค็ม (khem) = salty
  • หวาน (wǎan) = sweet
  • เปรี้ยว (bprîiao) = sour
  • ขม (khǒm) = bitter
  • น่ากิน (nâa-gin) = looks tasty
  • กลิ่นหอม (glìn-hǎawm) = smells good

To make any of these words negative, just put ไม่ (mâi) in front.

Ingredients

B- How to Order Food

Do you plan on visiting Thailand to sample some of these amazing dishes? Then you should know how to order at a Thai food restaurant!

Can I see the menu?

Thai sentence: ขอดูเมนูหน่อย
Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-duu-mee-nuu-nàauy

I want to order the food.

Thai sentence: สั่งอาหารหน่อย
Thai pronunciation:sàng-aa-hǎan-nàauy

I Want to Order the Food

I want to order the drink.

Thai sentence: สั่งเครื่องดื่มหน่อย
Thai pronunciation: sàng-khrûueang-dùuem-nàauy

I want ___.

Thai sentence: เอา + food name
Thai pronunciation: ao-___

Additional information:
If the menu has a picture by the item you want, you can say เอาอันนี้, which means “I want this one,” while pointing to the picture.

Is ___ spicy?

Thai sentence:  ___เผ็ดไหม
Thai pronunciation:  ___-phèt-mǎi

Please make it not spicy.

Thai sentence: เอาไม่เผ็ดเลย
Thai pronunciation: ao-mâi-phèt-looei

Please make it a little spicy.

Thai sentence: เอาเผ็ดนิดหน่อย
Thai pronunciation: ao-phèt-nít-nàauy

5. Bonus: Simple Thai Recipes 

For those who are interested in cooking Thai food, we’ve prepared a couple of easy Thai cuisine recipes you can make at home. The ingredients are quite simple and you won’t need any special equipment.

A- Thai-Style Omelet

Egg dishes are fairly simple to make, so we’ll start with a recipe for ไข่เจียว (khài-jiiao), or “omelet.” ไข่เจียว (khài-jiiao) is fried egg beaten into a round flat shape. The ingredients are simple and you can make it unique by adding your favorite ingredients.

Ingredients

  • ไข่ (khài) = egg 
  • น้ำปลา (nám-bplaa) = fish sauce 
  • น้ำมัน (nám-man) = cooking oil

There are only three ingredients you need to make this Thai-style omelet, though you can also add other ingredients. For extra protein, you can add minced pork or crab, for example. Sometimes, Thai people also add vegetables such as onion, tomato, chilis, or spring onion to make it sweet and colorful.

How to Make

1. Beat 2 eggs and mix them with 1 tablespoon of fish sauce. If you want to add protein or vegetables, do so in this step.

2. Heat the oil in a pan until there is light smoke coming up. This is the secret to making the ไข่เจียว (khài-jiiao) a bit crispy and not too oily.

3. Pour the egg mixture into the pan.

4. Fry the egg until the bottom is set and has become golden brown. Once this happens, flip it.

5. Fry the other side of the ไข่เจียว (khài-jiiao) until it becomes golden brown. Then, it’s ready to be served with rice.

B- Hainanese Chicken Rice

This recipe is a little bit more advanced. There are more ingredients and steps, but people will be impressed if you can make it. To help you out, our recipe below is for Hainanese Chicken Rice cooked with the rice cooker.  

Ingredients

  • ข้าว (khâao) = rice
  • สะโพกไก่ (sà-phôok-gài) = chicken thigh
  • น้ำมัน (nám-man) = cooking oil 
  • กระเทียม (grà-thiiam) = garlic
  • ขิง (khǐng) = ginger
  • เกลือ (gluuea) = salt
  • น้ำตาล (nám-thaan) = sugar
  • น้ำซุปไก่ (nám-súp-gài) = chicken broth

How to Make 

1. Heat oil in the pan. Once hot, stir-fry 2 tablespoons of chopped garlic and 5 slices of ginger until they are aromatic.

2. After that, add 2 cups of rice and stir-fry until the rice becomes a little yellow.

3. Then, put everything from the pan into the rice cooker and add 1 tablespoon of sugar, 1 tablespoon of salt, and 2.5 cups of chicken broth. Stir everything together.

4. Put the chicken into the rice cooker on top of the rice mixture, then push the “cook” button.

5. Wait until the rice cooker is done and then slice the chicken and put it on top of the rice, served with the dipping sauce.

Ingredients for Dipping Sauce

  • เต้าเจี้ยว (dtâo-jîiao) = salt soybean
  • ขิง (khǐng) = ginger
  • พริก (phrík) = chili
  • น้ำตาล (nám-dtaan) = sugar
  • น้ำส้มสายชู (nám-sôm-sǎai-chuu) = vinegar
  • ซิอิ้วหวาน (sì-íu-wǎan) = sweet dark soy sauce
  • น้ำมะนาว (nám-má-naao) = lime juice

How to Make Dipping Sauce

1. Chop 4 tablespoons of ginger and 2 tablespoons of chili.

2. Mix 6 tablespoons of salt soybean, chopped ginger, chopped chili, 1 tablespoon of sugar, 2 tablespoons of vinegar, 1 tablespoon of sweet dark soy sauce, and 1 tablespoon of lime juice. And it’s done!

Let’s Cook Thai Food

6. Conclusion

Are you hungry and already searching for your nearest Thai food restaurant? Please let us know what your favorite Thai food is, and which ones are totally new to you! 

We hope you learned a lot in this lesson and that we’ve inspired you to keep learning Thai. If you enjoyed this lesson, keep in mind that ThaiPod101.com has many more resources available to you. For example, you can check out our lesson on the Thai floating market or sneak a peek at our free vocabulary lists

Until next time, happy learning!

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An Easy-Breezy Thai Grammar Guide

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In many languages, หลักภาษา (lhàk-phaa-sǎa), or “grammar,” is one of the most difficult aspects to learn. Fortunately for you, Thai grammar is notorious for its relatively simple rules and structures when compared to other languages.

Still, if you’re thinking about learning Thai or have recently started, you may have several questions concerning Thai grammar: Are there a lot of Thai grammar rules? Should I learn the Thai alphabet and grammar together, or would it be too hard? On this page, you’ll get answers to all of your Thai grammar questions.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Thai Grammar vs. English Grammar – The Basics
  2. Parts of Speech
  3. Unique Thai Grammar Concepts
  4. Conclusion

1. Thai Grammar vs. English Grammar – The Basics

As you know, the grammar of any language is supported by several grammar rules that must be followed. To make matters worse, the vast majority of these rules have a number of exceptions that can only be learned through memorization. When combined, these two factors tend to make people nervous about studying another language’s grammar.  

However, as we mentioned a moment ago, you’re not going to have very many issues with this when studying Thai grammar. As a matter of fact, there are very few fixed rules in Thai grammar. Not only that, but the few rules that do exist are very easy to understand.

Since you’re reading this page, you’re most likely a native English speaker or someone who has been studying English a long time. In order to help you fully appreciate how easy it can be to master Thai grammar, we’ll be using English as a benchmark. 

Now, let’s look at two crucial grammar elements you should understand before continuing: Thai sentence structure and verb conjugation. 

1 – Sentence Structure

Like English, Thai expresses complete ideas (sentences) through the use of subjects, verbs, and objects. 

Both languages use the SVO (Subject + Verb + Object) structure for basic sentences:

  • I (S) drink (V) coffee (O).

However, Thai people sometimes use OVS (Object + Verb + Subject), which is the passive form, when they want to focus on the object. 

  • The glass (O) broke (V) I (S). 
    • I broke the glass.

See? There aren’t too many differences between the Thai and English sentence structure rules! 

2 – Verb Conjugation

In English, and many other languages, verbs need to be conjugated depending on factors such as tense, mood, number, and gender. 

Well, we have some more good news for you: There’s no verb conjugation in Thai grammar! Better yet, Thai doesn’t have tenses to begin with. In other words, there’s no need to worry about any of the factors you may be concerned with in English. Just use the verb as-is and include other words (such as time words) to add context as needed.

2. Parts of Speech

That was easy, right? Now let’s go into more detail about the different parts of speech in Thai, and how they compare to their English counterparts. 

1 – Nouns

คำนาม (kham-naam), or Thai nouns, are grammatically categorized into five types: 

  • สามานยนาม (sǎa-maan-yá-naam)
  • วิสามานยนาม (wí-sǎa-maan-yá-naam)
  • สมุหนาม (sà-hmù-hà-naam)
  • ลักษณะนาม (lák-sà-nà-naam)
  • อาการนาม (aa-gaan-rá-naam)

You may be wondering if having these different types makes learning grammar hard. Not at all. There’s no need to be able to categorize the nouns as long as you can use them correctly.  

When compared to English nouns, those in Thai are far easier to get the hang of. This is because Thai grammar doesn’t have articles, use noun declension, or separate countable and uncountable nouns.

One thing you may need to get used to is that Thai nouns are used differently with adjectives than those in English are. Instead of using “adjective + noun” like English does, Thai uses “noun + adjective.”

    → If you want to expand your vocabulary, visit our video lesson on the Top 25 Thai Nouns!
Learning Thai Nouns

2 – Pronouns 

คำสรรพนาม (kham-sàp-phá-nam), or Thai pronouns, are grammatically categorized into six types: 

  • บุรุษสรรพนาม (bù-rùt-sàp-phá-naam)
  • ประพันธสรรพนาม (bprà-phan-thá-sàp-phá-naam)
  • นิยมสรรพนาม (ní-yá-má-sàp-phá-naam)
  • อนิยมสรรพนาม (à-ní-yá-má-sàp-phá-naam)
  • วิภาคสรรพนาม (wí-phâak-sàp- phá-naam)
  • ปฤจฉาสรรพนาม (bprùet-chǎa-sàp-phá-naam)

Like with the noun categories, you don’t need to worry too much about memorizing these.  

One similarity between Thai and English grammar is that they both make use of personal pronouns. However, once you start learning Thai, you’ll see that Thai has more pronouns than English does. Still, they’re not too hard to remember!  

As for differences, you’ll notice that relative clauses and question words are considered pronouns in the Thai language. But does this make Thai grammar difficult? Not really, as the most important thing is that you know how to use them correctly.

    → Make sure to check out our vocabulary list of the Most Useful Thai Pronouns so you don’t get lost in the huge number of pronouns we have!
Are Thai Pronouns Similar to Those in English?

3 – Verbs 

คำกริยา (kham-gà-rí-yaa), or Thai verbs, are grammatically categorized into four types: 

  • อกรรมกริยา (à-gam-gà-rí-yaa)
  • สกรรมกริยา (sà-gam-gà-rí-yaa)
  • วิกตรรถกริยา (wí-gà-dtàt-thà-gà-rí-yaa)
  • กริยานุเคราะห์ (gà-rí-yaa-nú-khráw)

As you can guess, there’s no need to remember the name of each type or to know which verb belongs to which category. You just need to use them correctly, which is very easy to do.  

As mentioned before, Thai has no tense or verb conjugation. This means that you don’t have to worry about changing a verb’s form for tense, mood, number, or gender like you would in many other languages. 

Both Thai and English use auxiliary verbs, but they’re much simpler to use in Thai. The auxiliary verb is simply put in front of the verb, and that’s it. There’s no need to consider the subject or change the verb form. 

    → Verbs are an essential part of speech, so it’s important that you know the most common ones. See our lesson on the Top 25 Thai Verbs to get a head start!

4 – Adjectives and Adverbs 

In Thai grammar, adjectives and adverbs are treated differently than they are in English. Namely, Thai people don’t separate adverbs and adjectives, but view them as one grammar element called คำวิเศษณ์ (kham-ví-sèet). They’re categorized into ten types, which you don’t need to remember at all in order to use them correctly.

3. Unique Thai Grammar Concepts

Not everything in Thai grammar is similar or comparable to English; there are certainly some unique Thai grammar rules, too. We’ll give you a few examples so that you get the idea.

I’m Studying Unique Thai Grammar Structures

1 – คำราชาศัพท์

Thai people use different words and phrases when speaking with the royal family or monks. This is an advanced Thai grammar component and it’s not very easy to learn—most Thai people don’t even use it correctly. It’s like you have to learn a new set of words. Here are some examples:

English meaningNormal Thai wordThai word for royal familyThai word for monks
eatกิน
(gin)
เสวย (sà-wǒoei)ฉัน
(chǎn)
sickป่วย 
(bpùuai)
ทรงพระประชวร
(song-phrá-bprà-chuuan)
อาพาธ
(aa-phâat)
foodอาหาร 
(aa-hǎan)
พระกระยาหาร
(phrá-grà-yaa-hǎan)
ภัตตาหาร
(phát-dtaa-hǎan)

Use Different Words with Monks

2 – A Special Type of Pronoun

In Thai, there’s a pronoun type called วิภาคสรรพนาม (wí-phâak-sàp-phá-naam). This type of pronoun is used with a group of nouns to show whether each component of that group performs the same action or not. 

For example, ทุกคนต่างช่วยกันทำงาน (thúk-khon-dtàang-chûuai-tham-ngaan) means “each of everyone is helping each other working,” or in other words, “everyone works together.”

There is no pronoun or word like this in English.  

3 – Numeric Classifiers

Numeric classifiers and quantifiers, or ลักษณะนาม (lák-sà-nà-naam), describe the physical characteristics of a noun. For example, in English you would say, “two bottles of milk” or “three pieces of cake.” The concept is similar to numerical classifiers in Thai language. 

4. Conclusion

By now, you should know that Thai language grammar isn’t that hard to learn. Why?  

To recap:

  • Thai and English use the same SVO word order for basic sentences.
  • Thai doesn’t have verb conjugation or verb tenses.
  • Thai doesn’t take things like plurals or gender into consideration. 
  • Thai doesn’t have noun declension.
  • Thai doesn’t use articles with its nouns.

Are you interested yet? 

If you decide to continue learning Thai and want to know more about Thai grammar, don’t waste any time trying to find a good Thai grammar book. You’re already looking at the best option for learning Thai grammar: ThaiPod101.com! We provide our students with various lessons on the Thai language and culture, such as these: 

Of course, you can also click on any of the links we provided throughout the article to get more information on something we covered. 

So, what do you think? Do you find Thai grammar easy or pretty difficult so far? Let us know in the comments!

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Popular Thai Quotes and Proverbs

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When learning a language, you’re bound to come across a word or phrase that truly impresses you. Language learning is about so much more than figuring out how to communicate; it’s also about discovering a culture that’s different from yours and becoming immersed in a new way of thinking.

Since you’re learning Thai, it makes sense to study Thai quotes. In addition to picking up some of the language, you can gain insight about Thai values and beliefs from these words of wit and wisdom. In particular, you’ll find that many Thai quotes are influenced by Buddhism, the country’s main religion. 

In this lesson, ThaiPod101.com will present you with a list of Thai quotes in English that you should know.  From Thai motivational quotes to popular proverbs, you’ll have a ton of inspiring words to reflect on by the time you get to the end!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Thai Quotes About Work
  2. Thai Quotes About Life
  3. Thai Quotes About Time
  4. Thai Quotes About Love
  5. Thai Quotes About Friends and Family
  6. Thai Quotes About Happiness
  7. Thai Quotes About Language Learning
  8. Conclusion

1. Thai Quotes About Work

Let’s start with Thai quotes about success and work. As work is an important part of our lives, understanding Thai views on the topic will be immensely helpful to you as a learner.


1. เลือกทำงานที่เรารัก และจะไม่มีวันไหนที่รู้สึกว่าต้องทำงานเลย

Pronunciation: lûueak-tham-ngaan-thîi-rao-rák láe-jà-mâi-mii-wan-nǎi-thîi-rǔu-sùek-wâa-dtâawng- tham-ngaan-looei

Meaning: Choose the work you love and there won’t be a day you feel you have to work.

Author: Confucius (Chinese philosopher)

2. งานทุกอย่างที่สุจริตเป็นงานที่มีเกียรติทั้งนั้น

Pronunciation: ngaan-thúk-yàang-thîi-sùt-jà-rìt-bpen-ngaan-thîi-mii-gìiat-tháng-nán

Meaning: All trustworthy jobs are honorable.

Author: Panya Nanthaphiku (famous Thai monk)

This quote aims to teach people that all jobs are honorable, as long as they are legal and not immoral. You shouldn’t be ashamed of your job, for example, if it doesn’t pay well or is a labor job—at least you’re working!

3. งานที่เราชอบจะทำให้เราชอบทำงาน 

Pronunciation: ngaan-thîi-rao-châawp-jà-tham-hâi-rao-châawp-tham-ngaan

Meaning: The work you like makes you like to work.

Author: Wattana Weerayawattanon (singer and songwriter)

I Love My Job

4. อย่าทำงานเพื่อเก็บเงินไปใช้ในห้อง “ไอ ซี ยู”

Pronunciation: yàa-tham-ngaan-phûuea-gèp-ngoen-bpai-chái-nai-hâawng-ai-sii-yuu

Meaning: Don’t work and save money to spend it later for ICU.

Author: Meethiwachirodom (famous Thai monk)

This quote teaches the importance of time management and health. Some people work too much to earn a lot of money. As a result, they fail to take care of their health and end up spending all of their savings on hospital bills when they’re older and not as healthy as they used to be.

2. Thai Quotes About Life

Are you feeling stuck or dissatisfied with your life? There are a number of Thai quotes about life that teach valuable lessons you can apply to your situation right away. (These are also Instagram-friendly!)

    → Learn how to talk about Life Events in our relevant lesson, and be prepared for any major occasion in Thailand.

5. ชีวิตคนเรา…แสนสั้นเกินกว่าจะทำให้ทุกคน…พอใจ… และเชื่อว่าไม่มีใครคนไหนทำได้ 

Pronunciation: chii-wít-khon-rao-sǎaen-sân-gooen-gwàa-jà-tham-hâi-thúk-khon-phaaw-jai láe- chûuea-wâa-mâi-mii-khrai-khon-nǎi-tham-dâi

Meaning: Life is too short to be lived in order to please everyone, and there is no one who is capable of it. 

Author: Kutto (singer)

6. บ่อยครั้ง เรามักเผลอเอาสายตาของคนอื่นมาเป็นเครื่องวัดคุณค่าของเรา 

Pronunciation: bàauy-khráng rao-mák-phlǒoe-ao-sǎai-dtaa-khǎawng-khon-ùuen-maa-bpen- khrûueang-wát-khun-khâa-khǎawng-rao

Meaning: We often inadvertently use others’ judgement to value ourselves.

Author: Phaisan Visalo (famous Thai monk)

7. ถ้าคุณไม่อาจควบคุมอารมณ์ที่เกิดขึ้นมา อารมณ์จะพิพากษาชีวิตคุณ 

Pronunciation: thâa-khun-mâi-àat-khûuap-khum-aa-rom-thîi-gòoet-khûen-maa aa-rom-jà-phí-phâak- sǎa-chii-vít-khun

Meaning: If you cannot control your emotions, they will judge your life.

Author: Jatupol Chomphunit (famous orator)

People can be irrational and act cruel when they’re angry, and end up hurting someone or having regrets about what they said. Just one action controlled by anger can ruin your life.

Control Your Anger

8. ทางไปสู่ความลำบากนั้น…ไปสบาย ทางไปสู่ความสบายนั้น…ไปลำบาก 

Pronunciation: thaang-bpai-sùu-khwaam-lam-bàak-nán-bpai-sà-bàai thaang-bpai-sùu-khwaam-sà- baai-nán-lam-bàak

Meaning: The road to hardship is comfort but the road to comfort is hard.

Author: Su Boonliang (artist)

To live your life comfortably, you have to study and work hard to be successful in work (and vice-versa).  

9. การหาความมั่นคงในชีวิต ก็เหมือนคาดหวังว่าดวงอาทิตย์จะอยู่บนฟ้าตลอดเวลา 

Pronunciation: gaan-hǎa-khwaam-mân-khong-nai-chii-vít gâaw-mǔuean-khâat-wǎng-wâa-duuang- aa-thít-jà-yùu-bon-fáa-dtà-làawt-wee-laa

Meaning: To find stability in life is like expecting the sun to always be in the sky.

Author: Win Liaowarin (writer)

Buddhism teaches that one should never become attached to things—whether it be money, assets, one’s reputation or honor, etc.—because you can lose everything in a moment. Stability in life is another thing that one can lose; it’s impossible for one’s life to always be stable.  

3. Thai Quotes About Time

Time is precious. Study these Thai quotes about time to gain insight into how Thai people view this phenomenon. 


10. สายน้ำไม่ไหลย้อยกลับ 

Pronunciation: sǎai-nám-mâi-lǎi-yáawn-glàp

Meaning: The river has no return.

Author: quote from a song

11. อย่ามีชีวิต ชนิดที่เวลาผ่านมาแล้ว…มานึกเสียดายทีหลัง

Pronunciation: yàa-mii-chii-vít chá-nít-thîi-wee-laa-phâan-maa-láaeo maa-núek-sǐia-daai-thii-lǎng

Meaning: Don’t live your life in a way that you would regret when time passes.

Author: Wongthanong Chainarongsingh (founder of A Day magazine)

12. ระยะเวลา บอกแค่ว่าเรารู้จักกันนาน แต่ไม่ได้การันตีว่ารู้จักกันดี 

Pronunciation: rá-yá-wee-laa bàawk-wâa-rao-rúu-jàk-gàn-naan dtàae-mâi-dâi-gaa-ran-thii-wâa-rúu- jàk-gan-dii

Meaning: Time reflects that we have known each other for long, but doesn’t mean we know each other well.

Author: Napaporn Traiwitwareegul (DJ)

You can know someone for years and still not really know who they are as a person. 

13. การให้เวลา อาจมีค่ากว่าสิ่งของพิเศษ 

Pronunciation: gaan-hâi-wee-laa àat-mii-khâa-mâak-khwàa-sìng-khǎawng-phí-sèet

Meaning: Giving time is more precious than a special gift

Author: Round finger (writer)

14. เวลาและวารีไม่เคยคอยใคร 

Pronunciation: wee-laa-láe-waa-rii-mâi-khooei-raaw-khrai

Meaning: Time and tide wait for no man.

Author: Proverb

4. Thai Quotes About Love

Are you madly in love with someone? Or perhaps you’re a hopeless romantic? Either way, we think you’ll enjoy reading through these Thai love quotes with English translations!


15. รักแลกด้วยรัก ไม่ได้แลกด้วยชีวิต 

Pronunciation: rák-lâaek-dûuai-rák mâi-dâi-lâaek-dûuai-chii-vít

Meaning: To get love, you give love, not life.

Author: Napaporn Traiwitwareegul (DJ)

This famous quote means that if you want someone to love you, give him or her your love, not everything in your life.

16. “อกหัก” เป็นเวลาที่ดีที่สุดที่จะพิสูจน์ว่า เรารักคนอื่นมากกว่ารักตัวเองหรือไม่ 

Pronunciation: òk-hàk-bpen-wee-laa-thîi-dii-thîi-sùt-thîi-jà-phí-sùut-wâa rao-rák-khon-ùuen-mâak- gwàa-rák-dtuua-eeng-rǔue-mâi

Meaning: “Being heartbroken” is the best time to prove whether you love others more than yourself or not.

Author: Win Liaowarin (writer)

17. บางครั้งสิ่งที่เลวร้ายกว่าการอกหัก …ก็คือการสมหวังได้แต่งงาน… แล้วไม่พบความสมหวังของชีวิตคู่ 

Pronunciation: baang-khráng-sìng-thîi-leeo-ráai-khwàa-gaan-òk-hàk gâaw-khuue-gaan-sǒm-wǎng- dâi-dtàaeng-ngaan láaeo-mâi-phóp-khwaam-sǒm-wǎng-khǎawng-chii-vít-khûu

Meaning: Sometimes, the thing that is worse than heartbreak is to get married as you hope for but not being happy in married life.

Author: Win Liaowarin (writer)

I Hope to Get Married Someday

18. มันไม่ยากหรอกที่จะพูดคำว่ารัก แต่มันยากนักที่จะรักอย่างเข้าใจ 

Pronunciation: man-mâi-yâak-ràawk-thîi-jà-phûut-kham-wâa-rák dtàae-man-yâak-nák-thîi-jà-rák- yàang-khâo-jai

Meaning: It is not hard to confess love, but it is hard to love someone with comprehension.

Author: Mahasompong (famous Thai monk)

When you love someone, it’s easy to say so out loud. However, it is hard to love him or her with comprehension; to love is to support, not to intrude.  

19. อย่าวิ่งตามใครซักคนจนเราไม่เห็นคุณค่าของตัวเอง 

Pronunciation: yàa-wîng-dtaam-khrai-sák-khon-jon-rao-mâi-hěn-khun-khâa-khǎawng-dtuua-eeng

Meaning: Don’t chase someone to the point where you no longer see value in yourself. 

Author: Napaporn Traiwitwareegul (DJ)

When you love someone, you try hard to make him or her love you back. Sometimes, you try so hard to be the person they want that you no longer see good things in yourself.

5. Thai Quotes About Friends and Family

If you want to learn how friendship and family are perceived in Thai culture, these Thai quotes about family and friends are a great place to start.


20. อย่าแคร์คนอื่นมากกว่าครอบครัว อย่าตามใจตัวจนลืมว่าครอบครัวก็สำคัญ 

Pronunciation: yàa-khaae-khon-ùuen-mâak-gwàa-khrâawp-khruua yàa-dtaam-jai-dtuua-jon-luuem- wâa-khrâawp-khruua-gâaw-sǎm-khan

Meaning: Don’t care about others more than your family and don’t be self-indulgent to the point where you forget that family is also important.

Author: Mahasompong (famous Thai monk)

My Happy Family

21. นับเพื่อน อย่านับตอนดี ๆ นับตอนที่ชีวิตกำลังแย่ กำลังตกต่ำ นั่นแหละเพื่อนแท้ 

Pronunciation: náp-phûuen yàa-náp-dtaawn-dii-dii náp-dtaawn-thîi-chii-vít-gam-lang-yâae gam-lang-dtòk-dtàm nân-làae-phûuen-tháae

Meaning: Don’t count the number of friends when your life is good. You will know the number of your true friends when your life is at its worst. 

Author: Kutto (singer)

22. เพื่อนที่ไม่ยอมหรือไม่อาจตักเตือนเพื่อน ก็ต้องถือว่าหมดความเป็นเพื่อนเสียแล้ว 

Pronunciation: phûuen-thîi-mâi-yaawm-rǔue-mâi-àat-dtàk-dtuuen-phûuen gâaw-dtâawng-thǔue- wâa-mòt-khwaam-bpen-phûuen-sǐia-láaeo

Meaning: A friend who doesn’t or cannot give you criticism is no longer your friend.

Author: Phuthathatphiku (famous Thai monk) 

To be friends with someone, you must have good intentions toward them. Thus, friends must be able to tell each other if they do wrong and keep each other accountable for their actions.

23. เพื่อนกินหาง่าย เพื่อนตายหายาก 

Pronunciation: phûuen-gin-hǎa-ngâai phûuen-dtaai-hǎa-yâak

Meaning: A faithful friend is hard to find.

Author: Proverb

24. เลือดข้นกว่าน้ำ 

Pronunciation: lôoet-khôn-gwàa-nám

Meaning: Blood is thicker than water.

Author: Proverb

6. Thai Quotes About Happiness

Everyone wants to be happy, but not everyone is happy nowadays. We hope that these quotes help you find happiness in life.


25. ที่สุดของคน คือ การเป็นคนธรรมดาที่มีความสุข 

Pronunciation: thîi-sùt-khǎawng-khon khuue-gaan-bpen-khon-tham-má-daa-thîi-mii-khwaam-sùk

Meaning: The best thing a man can ask for is to be a normal person who is happy.

Author: Meethiwachirodom (famous Thai monk)

26. อย่ามองหาสิ่งที่ขาด จนพลาดที่จะมีความสุขกับสิ่งที่มี 

Pronunciation: yàa-maawng-hǎa-sìng-thîi-khàat jon-plâat-thîi-jà-mii-khwaam-sùk-gàp-sìng-thîi-mii

Meaning: Don’t try to achieve things you don’t have to the point you fail to be happy with what you have.

Author: Saithip Montrigul Na Ayudhya (DJ)

Sometimes, you only see the things that you don’t have and try hard to get them. In doing so, you fail to enjoy the things you already have. For example, you want to be the most successful businessman, so you work so hard that you no longer have time for your family.

27. อย่าหยุดตัวเองไว้กับความทุกข์ คุณมีสิทธิที่จะมีความสุขไม่น้อยกว่าคนอื่น 

Pronunciation: yàa-yhùt-dtuua-eeng-wái-gàp-khwaam-thúk khun-mii-sìt-thîi-jà-mii-khwaam-sùk-mâi- náauy-gwàa-khon-ùuen

Meaning: Don’t drown yourself in sadness, you have the right to be happy as much as everybody.

Author: Meethiwachirodom (famous Thai monk)

You Have the Right to be Happy

7. Thai Quotes About Language Learning

To close, let’s look at a couple of inspirational Thai quotes from language teachers about language learning! 

28. ภาษาคือการสื่อสารกันและกัน ตราบใดที่สื่อสารกันแล้วรู้เรื่อง นั่นก็ยอดเยี่ยมแล้ว 

Pronunciation: phaa-sǎa-khuue-gaan-sùue-sǎan-gan-láe-gan dtràap-dai-thîi-sùue-sǎan-gan-láaeo- rúu-rûueang nân-gâaw-yàawt-yìiam-láaeo

Meaning: Language is about communication. As long as it’s understandable, that’s great.

Author: Khanatip Sunthornrak (famous English teacher)

This quote teaches that when you learn a new language, you shouldn’t worry too much about all of the details (such as grammar or accents) as it discourages you from speaking. Instead, do your best to communicate; as long as the other parties understand, that is already a success.

29. การเรียนไม่ใช่เรื่องยาก ถ้ามองอุปสรรคเห็น และทำลายอุปสรรคเป็น 

Pronunciation: gaan-riian-mâi-châi-rûueang-yâak thâa-maawng-ùp-bphà-sàk-hěn láe-tham-laai-ùp- bphà-sàk-bpen

Meaning: Learning is not hard if you know the obstacle and how to overcome it.

Author: Somsri Thammasansophon (famous English teacher)

When you learn a new language, there will be areas that you excel in and others you’re not as good at. All you need to do is focus on your weaknesses and find a good learning method to help you overcome them.

I’m Inspired by Thai Quotes

8. Conclusion

Do you feel inspired and motivated after reading all of these Thai quotes and proverbs? Does your native language have similar quotes? Share with us in the comments below.

Learning Thai quotes can be a little difficult if you don’t know much vocabulary. That said, it is a good way to familiarize yourself with the Thai language and culture. Keep practicing! 

When you feel ready to move forward, ThaiPod101.com has many more useful lessons for you, such as words about sickness or taking a trip to Tiger Temple.

Happy learning!

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Must-Know Thai Business Phrases and Vocabulary

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Why are you learning Thai?  

One of the most common reasons people learn the language is that they’re doing business in Thailand or with Thai people. This makes a lot of sense, because knowing at least the most common business phrases in Thai is an advantage in the workplace. 

In this lesson, you’ll learn all of the Thai business phrases you need to get started, as well as the grammar behind them. In addition, we’ll provide you with a list of business terms you should know, categorized by what kind of situation you’d hear them in. 

Improve your Thai business language today!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Getting Started
  2. Thai Business Phrases for a Job Interview
  3. Thai Business Phrases for Coworker Interaction
  4. Phrases for a Thai Business Meeting
  5. Thai Business Phrases for Phone Calls and Emails
  6. Thai Business Phrases for a Business Trip
  7. Conclusion

1. Getting Started

Jobs

Before we get into Thai business words and their meanings in English, you should know how to speak formally with others in a business setting.

1- Formal Thai Pronouns

Below is a list of Thai pronouns you’re likely to use in Thailand business settings, so we advise you to memorize them before you try learning any other Thai business words or phrases.

2- Khráp and Khâ

To make a sentence sound formal in Thai, put the word ครับ (khráp) or ค่ะ (khà) at the end of a sentence when speaking. ครับ (khráp) is used when the speaker is male, while ค่ะ (khâ) is used when the speaker is female. 

2. Thai Business Phrases for a Job Interview

Job Interview

The first step in beginning your career is the job interview. As such, it’s to your advantage that you leave a nice first impression on your interviewer. Here are some common Thai business phrases you should know before your interview. 

1- Phrases Your Interviewer May Use

Hello.

  • In Thai: สวัสดี 
  • Pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii

While saying สวัสดี (sà-wàt-dii), it is best to do the action called ไหว้ (whâi), which is a Thai way of greeting.

Please have a seat.

  • In Thai: เชิญนั่ง 
  • Pronunciation: chooen-nâng

In Thai culture, it’s best to wait for your interviewer to ask you to sit down before you do so.

Please turn off your phone.

  • In Thai: กรุณาปิดโทรศัพท์มือถือด้วย 
  • Pronunciation: gà-rú-naa-bpìt-thoo-rá-sàp-muue-thǔue-dúuai

An interviewer will normally ask you to turn off your phone. If your phone rings during the interview, it may leave a bad impression on your interviewer, so it is proper Thai business etiquette to turn it off right away. 

However, if there’s any reason you can’t turn it off, you can tell the interviewer: ไม่สะดวกปิดโทรศัพท์ เพราะ___ ต้องขอโทษด้วย (mâi-sà-dùuak-bpìt-thoo-rá-sàp práw___ dtâawng-khǎaw-thôot-dûuai), which means “I can’t turn off the phone because ___, I’m sorry.”

Please introduce yourself.

  • In Thai: กรุณาแนะนำตัว 
  • Pronunciation: gà-rú-naa-náe-nam-dtuua
Please Introduce Yourself

What is your strength and weakness?

  • In Thai: ข้อดีและข้อเสียของคุณคืออะไร 
  • Pronunciation: khâaw-dii-láe-khâaw-sǐia-khǎawng-khun-khuue-à-rai

Do you have any questions?

  • In Thai: มีคำถามอะไรจะถามมั้ย 
  • Pronunciation: mii-kham-thǎam-à-rai-jà-thǎam-mái

2- List of Phrases You May Use

My name is ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันชื่อ ___ 
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-chûue-___

I graduated from ___ University in the faculty of ___, majoring in ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันเรียนจบจากมหาวิทยาลัย___คณะ___ สาขา___ 
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-riian-jòp-jàak-má-hǎa-wít-thá-yaa-lai-___-khá-ná-___-sǎa-khǎa-___

In the first blank, put the name of your university; in the second blank, put the name of the faculty; and in the third blank, put the name of your major.

I have experience in ___ for ___ years.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันมีประสบการณ์ในสายงาน ___ ทั้งหมด ___ ปี 
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-mii-bprà-sòp-gaan-nai-sǎai-ngaan-___-tháng-mòt-___-bpii

In the first blank, put your field of experience; in the second blank, put the number of years you’ve been in that field.

My responsibility is ___.

  • In Thai: หน้าที่ของผม / ดิฉัน คือ ___
  • Pronunciation: nâa-thîi-khǎawng-phǒm / dì-chǎn-khuue-___

My strength is ___.

  • In Thai: ข้อดีของผม / ดิฉัน คือ ___
  • Pronunciation: khâaw-dii-khǎawng-phǒm / dì-chǎn-khuue-___

My weakness is ___.

  • In Thai: ข้อเสียของผม / ดิฉัน คือ ___
  • Pronunciation: khâaw-sǐia-khǎawng-phǒm / dì-chǎn-khuue-___

Please repeat the question again.

  • In Thai: ช่วยทวนคำถามได้มั้ย
  • Pronunciation: chûuai-thuuan-kham-thǎam-dâi-mái

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to be interviewed.

  • In Thai: ขอบคุณที่ให้โอกาสมาสัมภาษณ์งาน
  • Pronunciation: khàawp-khun-thîi-hâi-oo-gàat-maa-sǎm-phâat-ngaan

3. Thai Business Phrases for Coworker Interaction

Business Phrases

When doing business with Thai people, knowing business Thai vocabulary isn’t enough. You should also know how to communicate with your coworkers at both the business level and the social level. Here are some phrases you may find helpful.

1- Business Introductions

Self-introduction for males

  • สวัสดีครับ ผมชื่อ___เป็นพนักงานใหม่อยู่แผนก___ครับ
  • sà-wàt-dii-khráp phǒm-chûue-___-bpen-phá-nák-ngaan-mài-yùu-phá-nàaek-___-khráp
  • “Hello, my name is____. I’m a new employee in ___ Department.”

In the first blank, put your name; in the second blank, put your department. 

Self-introduction for females

  • สวัสดีค่ะ ดิฉันชื่อ___เป็นพนักงานใหม่อยู่แผนก___ค่ะ
  • sà-wàt-dii-khà dì-chǎn-chûue-___-bpen-phá-nák-ngaan-mài-yùu-phá-nàaek-___-khà
  • “Hello, my name is ___. I’m a new employee in ___ Department.”

Giving phone numbers and email

  • นี่คือเบอร์โทรและอีเมลของผม / ฉัน
  • nîi-khuue-booe-thoo-láe-ii-meeo-khǎawng-phǒm / chǎn
  • “This is my phone number and email.”

2- Business Performance Evaluations

Compliments about work performance

  • คุณทำดีมาก
  • khun-tham-dii-mâak
  • “You did a great job.”
  • ผลงานของคุณดีมาก
  • phǒn-ngaan-khǎawng-khun-dii-mâak
  • “Your performance is very good.”
  • อันนี้ใช้ได้แล้ว
  • an-níi-chái-dâi-láaeo
  • “This one is okay.”

Feedback about work performance

  • อันนี้ไม่ผ่านนะ ไปแก้มาใหม่
  • an-níi-mâi-phàan-ná bpai-gâae-maa-mài
  • “This one needs to be fixed.”
  • ช่วงนี้คุณทำงานไม่ค่อยดีเท่าไหร่ มีปัญหาอะไรรึเปล่า
  • chûuang-níi-khun-tham-ngaan-mâi-khâauy-dii-thâo-rài mii-bpan-hǎa-à-rai-rúe-bplào
  • “You are not doing well recently. Are there any problems?”

3- Phrases for Other Business Situations

Asking for help

  • ช่วยดูตรงนี้ให้หน่อยได้มั้ย
  • chûuai-duu-dtrong-níi-hâi-nàauy-dâi-mái
  • “Could you please take a look at this?”
Could You Please Take a Look at This?
  • ขอคำแนะนำเรื่อง___หน่อย
  • khǎaw-kham-náe-nam-rûueang-___-nàauy
  • “Please give me advice about___.”

Thank you

  • ขอบคุณ
  • khàawp-khun
  • Thank you.”

Sorry

  • ขอโทษ
  • khǎaw-thôot
  • Sorry.”

4. Phrases for a Thai Business Meeting

Let’s go over some important phrases for Thai business meetings. If you’ve spent any time in the business world, you know that meetings are an essential aspect of any job. Knowing the most common phrases and implementing proper Thai business meeting etiquette will give you a huge advantage. 

Let’s start the meeting.

  • In Thai: ขอเริ่มการประชุม
  • Pronunciation: khǎaw-rôoem-gaan-bprà-chum

Do you have any questions?

  • In Thai: มีคำถามอะไรมั้ย
  • Pronunciation: mii-kham-thǎam-à-rai-mái

Do you have any comments?

  • In Thai: มีความเห็นอะไรมั้ย
  • Pronunciation:mii-khwaam-hěn-à-rai-mái
Do You Have Any Comments?

I agree.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันเห็นด้วย
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-hěn-dûuai

I disagree.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันไม่เห็นด้วย
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-mâi-hěn-dûuai

What do you think about this?

  • In Thai: คุณมีความเห็นอย่างไรเกี่ยวกับเรื่องนี้
  • Pronunciation: khun-mii-khwaam-hěn-yàang-rai-gìiao-gàp-rûueang-níi

I think ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันคิดว่า___
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-khít-wâa

I want more information about ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันขอข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมเกี่ยวกับ___
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-khǎaw-khâaw-muun-gìiao-gàp-___

If we agree to this, will there be any problem?

  • In Thai: ถ้าเราตกลงตามนี้ จะมีปัญหาอะไรมั้ย
  • Pronunciation: thâa-rao-dtòk-long-dtaam-ní jà-mii-bpan-hǎa-à-rai-mái

If we agree to buy from you, what is your offer?

  • In Thai: ถ้าเราตกลงซื้อจากคุณ คุณมีข้อเสนออะไรให้เราบ้าง
  • Pronunciation: thâa-rao-dtòk-long-súue-jàak-khun khun-mii-khâaw-sà-nǒoe-à-rai-hâi-rao-bâang

Any discount?

  • In Thai: มีส่วนลดมั้ย
  • Pronunciation: mii-sùuan-lót-mái

I have a special offer.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันมีข้อเสนอพิเศษ
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-mii-khâaw-sà-nǒoe-phí-sèet

5. Thai Business Phrases for Phone Calls and Emails

If you’re doing business in Thailand, being able to communicate via phone and email is pretty important. Below are some words and phrases you’ll find useful.

1- Phrases for Phone Calls

Hello, this is ___. Whom do you want to speak to?

  • In Thai: สวัสดี ที่นี่___ ต้องการติดต่อใคร
  • Pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii thîi-níi-___ dtâawng-gaan-dtìt-dtàaw-khrai-khá

As a staff member of a company, this is the phrase you use to answer the phone.

Hello, I want to talk to ___.

  • In Thai: สวัสดี ขอเรียนสาย___
  • Pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii khǎaw-riian-sǎai___

You say this when you call someone in a company whom you don’t have direct contact with.

Hello, I Want to Talk to the Manager.

Hello, my name is ___. I’m calling from ___. [name of company]

  • In Thai: สวัสดี ผม / ดิฉันชื่อ… ติดต่อมาจาก___
  • Pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii phom / di-chan-chûue-___ dtìt-dtàaw-maa-jàak-___

This is another phrase you can use when calling someone. This one is a little more formal than the one above. It’s often used when the party you’re calling doesn’t know you.

Please wait for a moment, I will transfer you.

  • In Thai: เดี๋ยวจะโอนสายให้ รบกวนถือสายรอซักครู่
  • Pronunciation: dǐiao-jà-oon-sǎai-hâi róp-guuan-thǔue-sǎai-raaw-sák-khrûu

Now ___ isn’t available. Will you leave a message or give him/her a phone number to call back?

  • In Thai: ตอนนี้คุณ___ไม่สะดวกรับสาย จะฝากข้อความหรือเบอร์ติดต่อกลับไว้มั้ย
  • Pronunciation: dtaawn-níi-khun-___-mâi-sà-dùuak-ráp-sǎai jà-fâak-khâaw-khwaam-rǔue-booe- thoo-dtìt-dtàaw-glàp-wái-mái

That is okay. I will call again.

  • In Thai: ไม่เป็นไร เดี๋ยวจะติดต่อมาใหม่
  • Pronunciation: mâi-bpen-rai dǐiao-jà-dtìt-dtàaw-maa-mài

Phrase for ending a phone call

  • In Thai: แค่นี้นะ สวัสดี
  • Pronunciation: khâae-níi-ná sà-wàt-dii

2- Phrases for Email

Dear ___,

  • In Thai: เรียน
  • Pronunciation: riian

Please be informed accordingly

  • In Thai: จึงเรียนมาเพื่อทราบ
  • Pronunciation: jueng-riian-maa-phûuea-sâap

Best Regards,

  • In Thai: ขอแสดงความนับถือ
  • Pronunciation: khǎaw-sà-daaeng-khwaam-náp-thǔue

6. Thai Business Phrases for a Business Trip

Our final category is Thai phrases for business trips. If you travel a lot, you should remember these.

1- Making a Reservation

I want to book a one-way trip / round trip ___ [vehicle] ticket to ___ [place].

  • In Thai: ผม / ฉันต้องการจองตั๋ว ___ [vehicle] แบบเที่ยวเดียว / ไปกลับ ไปที่___ [place]
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / chǎn-dtâawng-gaan-jaawng-dtǔua-___-bàaep-thîiao-diiao / bpai-glàp -bpai-thîi-___

เที่ยวเดียว (thîiao-diiao) means “one-way trip,” while ไปกลับ (bpai-glàp) means “round trip.” 

I want to book a room for ___ people.

  • In Thai: ผม / ฉันต้องการจองห้องพักสำหรับ ___ คน
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / chǎn-dtâawng-gaan-jaawng-hâawng-phák-sǎm-ràp-___-khon

Which date do you want to check in?

  • In Thai: ลูกค้าต้องการเข้าพักวันไหนคะ
  • Pronunciation: lûuk-kháa-dtâawng-gaan-khâo-phák-wan-nǎi-khá

ลูกค้า (lûuk-kháa) means “customer” in Thai. Instead of using “you,” hotel staff often use ลูกค้า (lûuk-kháa) to refer to their customer.

How long do you want to stay?

  • In Thai: ลูกค้าต้องการพักกี่คืน
  • Pronunciation: lûuk-kháa-dtâawng-gaan-phák-gìi-khuuen

Any promotion or discount?

  • In Thai: มีโปรโมชั่นหรือส่วนลดอะไรมั้ย
  • Pronunciation: mii-bproo-moo-chân-rǔue-sùuan-lót-à-rai-mái

2- Your Stay in the Hotel

I want to check in. I already made a reservation.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันต้องการเช็คอิน จองห้องไว้แล้ว
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-dtâawng-gaan-chék-in jaawng-hâawng-wái-láaeo

There’s no Thai word for “check in.” Thai people use the same word as in English.

Your room is on ___ floor, number ___.

  • In Thai: ห้องพักของลูกค้าอยู่ชั้น ___ [floor number] ห้อง ___ [room number]
  • Pronunciation: hâawng-phák-khǎawng-lûuk-kháa-yùu-chán-___-hâawng-___

Here is a key and breakfast coupon.

  • In Thai: นี่คือกุญแจและคูปองอาหารเช้า
  • Pronunciation: nîi-khuue-gun-jaae-láe-khuu-bpaawng-aa-hǎan-cháo

I want to check out.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันต้องการเช็คเอาท์
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-dtâawng-gaan-chék-áo

There is no Thai word for “check out.” Thai people use the same word as in English.

I Want to Check Out

2- More Useful Phrases

Where should we meet?

  • In Thai: เราจะเจอกันที่ไหนดี
  • Pronunciation: rao-jà-jooe-gan-thîi-nǎi-dii

When should we meet?

  • In Thai: เราจะเจอกันกี่โมง
  • Pronunciation: rao-jà-jooe-gan-gìi-moong

I will pick ___ up from the ___ at ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ฉันจะไปรับ ___ [person] ที่ ___ [place] ตอน ___ [time]
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / chǎn-jà-bpai-ráp-___-thîi-___-dtaawn-___

Thank you for this trip.

  • In Thai: ขอบคุณสำหรับทริปนี้
  • Pronunciation: khàawp-khun-sǎm-ràp-tríp-níi

7. Conclusion

How do you feel after going over all of these Thai business phrases? Are you more confident in your business communication skills? Let us know in the comments below.

If you want to learn more-specific terms, words, or phrases than the ones we covered here, check out our other lessons on ThaiPod101.com. Here are some lessons you may be interested in: 

Happy Thai learning, and good luck with your business endeavors!

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The Best Thai YouTube Channels to Learn Thai in 2020

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We think it’s safe to say that everyone has been guilty of spending hours upon hours on YouTube, going from one video to the next. Video is the most popular content format nowadays, and it’s so easy to become addicted…  

So why not learn the Thai language on YouTube? If you’re like many people, you simply don’t know where to start—or if it’s even possible.

We’re here to tell you that you can actually learn Thai online for free on YouTube. In this article, we’ll introduce you to the top Thai YouTube channels for learners, so you’ll know exactly where to start. We’ve provided some great channels in a variety of categories, so that you’ll definitely be able to find something you’re interested in. 

One of the best options is the ThaiPod101 YouTube channel, and we’ll give you more details about this later.  But first, here are our top Thai YouTube picks!

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  1. Hot Thai Kitchen
  2. Mark Weins
  3. GMM International
  4. VoBrain
  5. Peachii
  6. Loukgolf’s English Room
  7. Itchy feet ภาษาอังกฤษติดเที่ยว
  8. GMM TV
  9. ครูโอ๋ สื่อการเรียนการสอน (khruu-ǒo-sùue-gaan-riian-gaan-sǎawn)
  10. ThaiPod101
  11. Conclusion

1. Hot Thai Kitchen


Category: Food
YouTube channel link: https://www.YouTube.com/user/PailinsKitchen/about
Level: Beginner

Do you like Thai food? Do you like to cook? If so, then this is the channel for you.  

Pailin is a Thai woman living in Canada and working as a professional chef. On her Thai cooking YouTube channel, she shares a lot of videos on how to cook a variety of traditional dishes. She speaks mostly in English, but she also teaches Thai vocabulary about food. Her videos make it easy for new learners to pick up simple vocabulary, as well as learn about Thai food and culture.  

Our only warning: Don’t watch her channel late at night, because you’ll get hungry!

A Thai Woman Cooking Food

Let’s cook Thai food together

2. Mark Weins


Category: Food
YouTube channel link: https://www.YouTube.com/user/migrationology/about
Level: Beginner

For the foodies and culture vultures, here’s another wonderful channel on YouTube. Thai food, travel, and cultural insight all make an appearance in Mark’s videos. To give you some context, Mark Wiens is an American who loves Thai food, and eventually married a Thai woman and moved to Thailand. 

His vlog videos are recorded in English, and they show his journey of trying Thai street food and exploring Thai culture. This channel is a good place for beginners to learn the Thai language, as you’ll hear some Thai conversations between Mark and local Thai people

3. GMM International


Category: Thai songs
YouTube channel link: https://www.YouTube.com/user/grammyinter/about
Level: Intermediate – Advanced

ดนตรีไม่มีพรมแดน (don-dtrii-mâi-mii-phrom-daaen) is a Thai saying that means: “You can enjoy the music without really understanding the language.”  

While this is true, we think that you’ll enjoy Thai music more if you understand what the lyrics mean. This is why we recommend checking out GMM Grammy, one of the biggest Thai record labels. Currently, it has a special channel for international fans.  

On its Thai YouTube music channel, there are many music videos with subtitles available in English, Japanese, and Chinese. Of course, Thai learners can take advantage of this and use the channel to learn Thai while enjoying some great music. Songs can be especially helpful for learning new vocabulary and becoming familiar with Thai pronunciation.

A Woman Listening to Music with Earbuds

I love Thai songs.

4. VoBrain


Category: Thai songs
YouTube channel link: https://www.YouTube.com/channel/UCob3HtFFy9enpDX9wRbr6ig
Level: Intermediate – Advanced

This is another great channel for Thai music lovers. 

VoBrain aims to teach English to Thai people through songs and educational videos, so it uploads many Thai songs with English subtitles.  

Despite not being made directly for Thai language learners, these Thai YouTube videos contain great content that you can use to learn Thai as well. However, the downside of this channel is that you can only learn the meaning of Thai words, and not their pronunciation. 

5. Peachii


Category: Lifestyle
YouTube channel link: https://www.YouTube.com/user/madmegan06/about
Level: Intermediate – Advance

This is one of the most popular channels among Thai teenagers. 

Peachii is a Thai business woman who lives in London and married a British man, known as Stephen Oppa. She is one of the owners of the Gouni business, which helps Thai people study abroad. She does vlogging and posts videos to capture the different moments of her life, teach English to Thai people, and promote her business.  

Her videos are recorded using a mix of Thai and English. This means that, while her videos are aimed at teaching English, you can still watch this channel to pick up some new Thai words. Because Peachii is a native Thai, you’ll also be able to familiarize yourself with the Thai accent and culture.

One of the strengths of learning Thai online with her YouTube channel is the interesting content. Her videos are so varied that you’ll never get bored! 

6. Loukgolf’s English Room


Category: Educational TV Show
YouTube channel link: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHpN16LZ6YGWIWw1gMWIVhw
Level: Beginner – Intermediate

If you were to ask Thai students about the most popular English teachers, Loukgolf would absolutely come up a lot. He is a passionate teacher who understands and gets along with students and teenagers well.  

Apart from owning an English school, he also did educational TV shows. He would invite Thai celebrities and talk to them in English, as a way to encourage young Thai people to learn and speak English. The show is done in about 70% English and 30% Thai with English subtitles.  

Despite being geared toward English learners, Thai learners can also benefit from these shows. You can learn new vocabulary and get familiar with how Thai people speak in daily life. Moreover, this show is very fun—if you love Thai celebrities, don’t miss this channel!

7. Itchy feet ภาษาอังกฤษติดเที่ยว


Category: Educational TV Show
YouTube channel link: https://www.YouTube.com/user/ThaiPBS/search?query=itchy+feet
Level: Intermediate – Advanced

This channel is perfect for Thai learners who love traveling.  

This show features both Thai and English speech, as well as subtitles in both languages. Actually, this channel aims to teach English to Thai people through videos about trips to various places. The host speaks in English and then translates what he just said into Thai.  

If you’ve been learning Thai for a while and understand at least the basics, you can practice your Thai listening skills by watching these videos.

A Woman Photographing Something on Her Trip

Learn through the trip

8. GMM TV


Category: TV Drama
YouTube channel link: https://www.YouTube.com/user/GMMTVSPOTLIKE
Level: Intermediate – Advanced

Thai dramas on YouTube? Yes please! 

If you want to enjoy watching a good TV drama, not understanding the language can be a problem. In order to completely understand what’s being said in a Thai TV drama, your Thai skills have to be pretty good.  

But if your Thai isn’t at that level yet, you can still enjoy Thai TV dramas and learn the language at the same time. GMM TV uploads many TV dramas with English subtitles, so you can improve your Thai skills with little to no effort. 😉

A Woman Eating Popcorn and Watching TV

Thai TV drama is fun.

9. ครูโอ๋ สื่อการเรียนการสอน (khruu-ǒo-sùue-gaan-riian-gaan-sǎawn)


Category: Thai Learning
YouTube channel link: https://www.YouTube.com/channel/UCv2oBsP3i7hDFuHXmCbpQ2A/
Level: Beginner

ครูโอ๋ (khruu-ǒo) is a Thai teacher who uploads many educational videos for Thai children.  His channel name means “Teacher Oh – education media.”

He believes that good and fun video content helps children learn better, and his channel mainly targets young Thai children. All of the lessons are in Thai, but Thai learners can still benefit from these Thai language lessons. For example, you can learn how to read and write the Thai alphabet.

10. ThaiPod101


Category: Thai Learning
YouTube channel link: https://www.YouTube.com/user/ThaiPod101/
Level: Beginner – Advanced

There are many channels you can visit if you want to learn Thai through YouTube videos. But you probably noticed that many of them aren’t actually designed to teach Thai to foreigners. 

If you want to learn Thai online in the most effective way possible, visit the ThaiPod101 YouTube channel today. We provide all kinds of good Thai language lessons for you, from the Thai alphabet to Thai pronunciation and grammar. In addition, you’ll find plenty of native Thai dialogues and language-learning tips. Plus, ThaiPod101 uploads videos regularly to ensure you always have tons of videos to choose from. We hope to see you around!

Woman Watching the ThaiPod101 YouTube Channel with Headphones

I learn Thai at ThaiPod channel.

11. Conclusion

There are many different channels that can serve as effective supplements to your normal language learning routine, but ThaiPod101 is the best! See for yourself, and start speaking real Thai today.

Are there any other YouTube channels you use to learn Thai? Please share with us in the comments! ^^

After spending some time on your favorite Thai learning YouTube channels, visit ThaiPod101.com and explore all that we have to boost your studies. For example: 

Happy Thai learning!

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