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Archive for the 'Thai Phrases' Category

Learn Basic Thai Phone Call Phrases

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Who doesn’t have a phone these days? 

In Thailand, nearly 90% of the population owns a mobile phone and uses it on a daily basis.

While chat applications and social media have grown in popularity over the years, phone calls are still an important means of communication. It’s through phone calls that we make appointments, stay in close contact with friends and family, ask for information, and complete other essential tasks. 

Because telephone communication is such an integral part of life, learning even a few basic Thai phone call phrases will greatly benefit you as a language learner. 

In this article, you’ll learn how to make a phone call in Thai. We will cover a variety of phrases and expressions you’ll need for answering the phone, introducing yourself, stating your reason for calling, handling connection issues, ending the call, and more! In addition, we’ve provided two sample phone conversations in Thai so you can see how these phrases might be used during an actual call.

Let’s get right to it.

A Guy on the Couch Talking on the Phone with a Remote in His Hand

I’m calling my Thai friends.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. How to Begin the Phone Call
  2. Stating Your Reason for Calling
  3. When They’re Not Available
  4. Problems During the Call
  5. Ending the Call
  6. Sample Phone Conversations
  7. Conclusion

1. How to Begin the Phone Call 

There are a couple of different ways a telephone conversation in Thailand might begin, depending on whether it’s a formal or informal situation. In either case, the call will begin with a greeting and the caller will ask if they have the right number. 

In a formal context, the caller will introduce themself and then state their purpose for calling. But if the context is informal, the caller will simply ask if they can speak to someone. 

With this in mind, here are the most typical Thai phone call phrases for greeting, checking, and self-introductions. 

1 – Greeting

There are two common ways to answer the phone in Thai:

Formal situation

Thai: สวัสดี
Pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii
English: Hello

Informal situation

Thai: ฮัลโหล
Pronunciation: han-lǒo
English: Hello

2 – Checking

After your greeting, you can check whether you’re contacting the right number by using one of these useful Thai phrases for a phone call.

Formal situation

Thai: ที่นี่ใช่___รึเปล่า
Pronunciation: thîi-nîi-châi-___-rúe-bplào
English: Is this ___?

Informal situation

Thai: ใช่___รึเปล่า
Pronunciation: châi-___-rúe-bplào
English: Is this ___?

3 – Introducing yourself

In formal situations, it’s proper to introduce yourself before stating your reason for calling. In many cases, the person who receives your call will inquire about who you are.

Question:  

Thai: ติดต่อมาจากไหน
Pronunciation: dtìt-dtàaw-maa-jàak-nǎi
English: Who is calling?

Answer:  

Thai: ดิฉันชื่อ…ติดต่อมาจาก… (Female answer)
Pronunciation: dì-chǎn-chûue-…-dtìt-dtàaw-maa-jàak-… 
English: My name is ___. I’m calling from ___.

Thai: ผมชื่อ…ติดต่อมาจาก… (Male answer)
Pronunciation: phǒm-chûue-…-dtìt-dtàaw-maa-jàak-… 
English: My name is ___. I’m calling from ___.

2. Stating Your Reason for Calling

During a formal call, the next step is usually to give your reason for calling. You can also skip this step and just ask if you can speak to someone (which is most often how an informal call goes). Below are several Thai phone conversation phrases you can use for these purposes. 

1 – I want to…

Question:  

Thai: ต้องการติดต่อเรื่องอะไร
Pronunciation: dtâawng-gaan-dtìt-dtàaw-rûueang-à-rai
English: How can I help you?

Answer:  

Thai: ต้องการสอบถามเรื่อง…
Pronunciation: dtâawng-gaan-sàawp-thǎam-rûueang-…
English: I want to ask about…

Thai: ต้องการจอง…
Pronunciation: dtâawng-gaan-jaawng-…
English: I want to book

Thai: ต้องการนัด…
Pronunciation: dtâawng-gaan-nát-…
English: I want to make an appointment

Thai: ต้องการเสนอ…
Pronunciation: dtâawng-gaan-sà-nǒoe…
English: I want to offer…

Thai: โทรกลับมาหาคุณ ___
Pronunciation: thoo-glàp-maa-hǎa-khun-___
English: I’m calling ___ back.

A Woman Talking on the Phone while Working Late at the Office

I’m calling Miss Pranee back.

2 – I want to speak to…

Formal situation

Thai: ขอเรียนสายคุณ ___
Pronunciation: khǎaw-riian-sǎai-khun-___
English: May I speak to ___?

Informal situation

Thai: ขอสาย___หน่อย
Pronunciation: khǎaw-sǎai-___-nàauy
English: May I speak to ___?

3 – Please wait a moment…

Formal situation

Thai: รบกวนถือสายสักครู่
Pronunciation: róp-guuan-thǔue-sǎai-sàk-khrûu
English: Please wait for a moment.

Thai: รอสักครู่ จะโอนสายให้
Pronunciation: raaw-sàk-khrûu jà-oon-sǎai-hâi
English: Wait for a moment, I will put you on the line.

Informal situation

Thai: รอแป๊บนะ
Pronunciation: raaw-bpáep-ná
English: Wait a minute.

Thai: ถือสายแป๊บนะ
Pronunciation: thǔue-sǎai-bpáep-ná
English: Hold on for a minute.

3. When They’re Not Available 

Sometimes, you may not be able to contact the person you intended to. In this case, the receiver will let you know why that person is unavailable and you’ll have the opportunity to leave a message.

1 – Reason for unavailability

Thai: ___ไม่อยู่
Pronunciation: ___mâi-yùu
English:  ___ is not here.

Thai: ตอนนี้___ไม่สะดวกรับสาย
Pronunciation: dtaawn-níi-___-mâi-sà-dùuak-ráp-sǎai
English: ___ can’t answer the phone now.

Thai: ตอนนี้สายไม่ว่าง
Pronunciation: dtaawn-níi-sǎai-mâi-wâng
English: The line is not available now.

Thai: ตอนนี้___ติดประชุมอยู่
Pronunciation: dtaawn-níi-dtìt-bprà-chum-yùu
English: ___ is in a meeting now.

2 – Leaving a message

In formal situations, the receiver will likely ask if you would like to leave a message. Here are a couple of phrases you could use to do so: 

Thai: ฝากข้อความเอาไว้ให้ได้มั้ย
Pronunciation: fàak-khâaw-kwaam-ao-wái-hâi-dâi-mái
English: Can I leave a message?

Thai: ให้โทรกลับมาที่___ได้มั้ย
Pronunciation: hâi-thoo-glàp-maa-thîi-___-dâi-mái
English: Can ___ call back at ___?

A Napkin that Says Call Me! with a Phone Number Written Down

Can he call back?

4. Problems During the Call

Any number of issues could arise during your phone call, such as a bad connection or unclear message. These Thai phone call phrases can help you navigate this type of situation:

Thai: ช่วยพูดเสียงดังหน่อยได้มั้ย ไม่ค่อยได้ยินเลย
Pronunciation: chûuai-phûut-sǐiang-dang-nàauy-dâi-mái mâi-khâauy-dâi-yin-looei
English: Can you speak louder? I can’t hear you.

Thai: สัญญาณไม่ค่อยดีเลย ได้ยินมั้ย
Pronunciation: sǎn-yaan-mâi-khâauy-dii-looei dâi-yin-mái
English: The connection is not so good. Can you hear me?

Thai: ไม่ได้ยินเลย
Pronunciation: mâi-dâi-yin-looei
English: I can’t hear you.

Thai: ไม่แน่ใจว่าสะกดยังไง
Pronunciation: mâi-nâae-jai-wâa-sà-gòt-yang-ngai
English: I’m not sure how to spell this.

Thai: ขอทวนอีกครั้ง
Pronunciation: khǎaw-thuuan-ìik-khráng
English: I will repeat it again.
Additional note: In formal situations, it is good to repeat the details of an important conversation to make sure that you understand things correctly.

Thai: คุณโทรผิด
Pronunciation: khun-thoo-phìt
Pronunciation: khun-thoo-phìt

5. Ending the Call

The final part of the phone conversation will be ending the call. Here are a few ways to end a phone call in Thai:

Thai: แค่นี้นะ
Pronunciation: khâae-níi-ná
English: That’s it.
Additional note: This is the most common phrase for ending phone calls in Thailand.

Thai: ขอบคุณ
Pronunciation: khàawp-khun
English: Thank you.

Thai: แล้วเจอกัน
Pronunciation: láaeo-jooe-gan
English: See you.

6. Sample Phone Conversations

Now that you’ve learned all the essential Thai phone call phrases, let’s see how they might be used in real phone conversations. Below are two sample conversations: one casual call between friends and one formal call about booking a table. 

A conversation between friends

เอ:  

  • ฮัลโหล
  • han-lǒo
  • Hello.

บี:  

  • ฮัลโหลเอ นี่บีเองนะ
  • han-lǒo-ee nîi-bii-eeng-ná
  • Hello, A. This is B speaking.

เอ:  

  • ว่าไงบี
  • wâa-ngai-bii
  • What’s up, B?

บี:  

  • วันเสาร์นี้ว่างมั้ย ไปกินข้าวกัน
  • wan-sǎo-níi-wâang-mái bpai-gin-khâao-gan
  • Are you available this Saturday? Let’s have a meal together.

เอ:  

  • ได้สิ เจอกันซัก 10 โมงดีมั้ย ที่ร้านเดิมนะ เดี๋ยวเราโทรไปจองโต๊ะให้
  • dâi-sì jooe-gan-sák-sìp-moong-dii-mái thîi-ráan-dooem-ná dǐiao-rao-thoo-bpai-jaawng-dtó-hâi
  • Sure, should we meet at ten a.m. at the same restaurant? If so, I will book a table for us.

บี:  

  • ได้ เสร็จแล้วไปซื้อของเป็นเพื่อนเราหน่อยได้มั้ย เราอยากได้แว่นกันแดดอันใหม่
  • dâi sèt-láaeo-bpai-súue-khǎawng-bpen-phûuean-rao-nàauy-dâi-mái rao-yàak-dâi-wâaen-gan-dàaet- an-mài
  • Yes. After the meal, can you go shopping with me? I want new sunglasses.

เอ:  

  • โอเค เราก็อยากได้เหมือนกัน แต่เราอยู่ได้ถึงแค่บ่ายสองนะ
  • oo-khee rao-gâaw-yàak-dâi-mǔuean-gan dtàae-rao-yùu-dâi-thǔeng-kâae-bàai-sǎawng-ná
  • Okay, I want a new pair too. But I can only stay until two p.m.

Two Friends Posing with Sunglasses on

We want new sunglasses.

บี:  

  • ได้ งั้นเจอกันวันเสาร์นี้นะ
  • dâi ngán-jooe-gan-wan-sǎo-níi-ná
  • No problem, see you this Saturday.

เอ:  

  • เจอกัน แค่นี้นะ
  • jooe-gan khâae-níi-ná
  • See you.

Booking a table at a restaurant

เอ:  

  • สวัสดีค่ะ
  • sà-wàt-dii-khà
  • Hello.

พนักงานร้านอาหาร:  

  • สวัสดีครับ คาเฟ่บ้านยิ้ม ยินดีให้บริการครับ
  • sà-wàt-dii-khráp khaa-fêe-bâan-yím yin-dii-hâi-baaw-rí-gaan-khráp
  • Hello, this is Ban Yim Cafe. How can I help you?

เอ:  

พนักงานร้านอาหาร:  

  • ได้ครับ สำหรับวันไหนดีครับ
  • dâi-khráp sǎm-ràp-wan-nǎi-dii-khráp
  • Okay, on which date?

เอ:  

  • วันเสาร์ที่ 19 พฤศจิกายน เวลา 10 โมงค่ะ
  • wan-sǎo-thîi-sìp-gâo-phrúet-sà-jì-gaa-yon-wee-laa-sìp-moong-khà
  • Saturday, November 19, at ten a.m.

พนักงานร้านอาหาร:  

  • เรียบร้อยครับ ลูกค้าอยากจะสั่งอาหารไว้ล่วงหน้ามั้ยครับ วันเสาร์นี้จะมีเมนูพิเศษเป็นเครปมะพร้าว ครับ มีแค่ 20 ที่เท่านั้นครับ
  • rîiap-ráauy-khráp lûuk-kháa-yàak-jà-sàng-aa-hǎan-wái-lûuang-nâa-mái-khráp wan-sǎo-níi-jà-mii- mee-nuu-phí-sèet-bpen-khréep-má-práao-khráp mii-khâae-yîi-sìp-thîi-thâo-nán-khráp
  • Done. Do you want to order the food in advance? This Saturday, our special menu is “coconut crepe.” There will be only 20 pieces.

เอ:  

  • จองเครปมะพร้าว 1 ที่ค่ะ
  • jaawng-khréep-má-práao-nùeng-thîi-khà
  • Then, I want one coconut crepe.

A Plate of Crepes

I want one coconut crepe.

พนักงานร้านอาหาร:  

  • ได้ครับ ขอทวนอีกครั้งนะครับ ลูกค้าต้องการจองโต๊ะสำหรับ 2 ท่าน วันเสาร์ที่ 19 พฤศจิกายน เวลา 10 โมง และจองเครปมะพร้าว 1 ที่ครับ
  • dâi-khráp khǎaw-thuuan-ìik-khráng-ná-khráp lûuk-kháa-dtâawng-gaan-jaawng-dtó-sǎm-ràp-sǎawng- thâan wan-sǎo-thîi-sìp-gâo-phrúet-sà-jì-gaa-yon-wee-laa-sìp-moong láe-jaawng-khréep-má- práao-nùeng-thîi-khráp
  • Okay, I will repeat it again. You want to book a table for two people on Saturday, November 19, at ten a.m. and order one coconut crepe.  

เอ:  

  • ถูกต้องค่ะ 
  • thùuk-dtâawng-khà 
  • That is correct.

พนักงานร้านอาหาร:  

  • ขอทราบชื่อลูกค้าด้วยครับ
  • khǎaw-sâap-chûue-lûuk-kháa-dûuai-khráp
  • What is your name?

เอ:  

  • เอค่ะ 
  • ee-khà 
  • My name is A.

พนักงานร้านอาหาร:  

  • เรียบร้อยครับ ขอบคุณครับ
  • rîiap-ráauy-khráp khàawp-khun-khráp
  • All done, thank you.

7. Conclusion

In this article, you learned many different Thai phone call phrases for use in typical phone conversations. You should now have more confidence to make and take phone calls, but don’t forget to practice often! 

What are some common phone phrases in your language? How different are they from those in Thai? Let us know in the comments! 

Now that you know how to make a phone call in the Thai language, you may want to explore other interesting topics here at ThaiPod101.com. Here are suggestions for you:

Happy learning! 

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10 Filler Words in the Thai Language You Should Know

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A good portion of conversation time is spent thinking about what to say next. Sometimes, we find ourselves searching for just the right word or figuring out how to respond to someone’s comment. These natural pauses in speech are often “filled” with small, usually meaningless words and expressions that make the lull feel less awkward for both parties. 

Thai filler words play a large role in the day-to-day conversations of native speakers, so it’s an important topic for Thai learners to study once they have the basics down. Being able to use filler words correctly will help you sound more like a native speaker and allow you to better understand Thai conversations. 

In this article, you’ll learn more about what filler words are and study the most common fillers in the Thai language. We’ll show you how to use each one and provide examples to give you a better idea of what they might sound like in a conversation.

Let’s get started.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. What are Thai filler words?
  2. อืม (uuem) – um
  3. เอ่อ (òoe) – ah
  4. หือ (hǔue)
  5. อ่าฮะ (àa-há) – yep
  6. แบบ (bàaep) – like
  7. อย่างนี้นะ (yàang-níi-ná) – well
  8. อะไรแบบนี้ (à-rai-bàaep-níi) – stuff like that
  9. คือว่า / พอดีว่า (khuue-wâa / phaaw-dii-wâa) – well
  10. ประมาณว่า (bprà-maan-wâa) – like
  11. ก็ (gâaw) – because
  12. Conclusion

1. What are Thai filler words?

Before we get ahead of ourselves, let’s go over some basic information about Thai filler words. 

Like those in other languages, Thai filler words are meaningless utterances we use to make our conversations smoother. Keep in mind, however, that there is no word for “filler words” in Thai. 

While filler words are most often used in spoken conversation, you might also find them written in certain types of literature (especially fiction novels). 

Now, let’s look at the most popular filler words in Thai! 

2. อืม (uuem) – um

Thai people often make the sound อืม (uuem) during conversations when they’re thinking about what to say or how to answer something. 

Example 1

  • พ่อ: วันนี้หนูอยากดูหนังเรื่องอะไร
  • ลูกสาว: อืม…หนูว่าดูหนังตลกดีกว่า จะได้คลายเครียด 
  • phâaw: wan-níi-nǔu-yàak-duu-nǎng-rûueang-à-rai
  • lûuk-sǎao: uuem…nǔu-wâa-duu-nǎng-dtà-lòk-dii-gwàa jà-dâi-khlaai-khrîiat
  • Dad: Which movie do you want to watch today?
    Daughter: Um… I think we should watch a comedy movie to relieve stress.

A Young Asian Woman Thinking with a Finger to Her Chin

Um… I think we should watch a comedy movie to relieve stress.

Example 2

  • เอ: ฉันอยากกินอาหารญี่ปุ่น
  • บี: ฉันอยากกินอาหารเกาหลี
  • ซี: อืม…งั้นเราไปกินอาหารญี่ปุ่น เสร็จแล้วไปกินบิงซูต่อกัน
  • ee: chǎn-yàak-gin-aa-hǎan-yîi-bpùn
  • bii: chǎn-yàak-gin-aa-hǎan-gao-lǐi
  • sii: uuem…ngán-rao-bpai-gin-aa-hǎan-yîi-bpùn sèt-láaeo-bpai-gin-bing-suu-dtàaw-gan
  • A: I want to eat Japanese food.
  • B: I want to eat Korean food.
  • C: Um… Let’s eat Japanese food and then Bingsu.

3. เอ่อ (òoe) – ah

เอ่อ (òoe) is a popular filler in Thai, used to express shock when the speaker isn’t sure what to say. 

Example 1

  • ปลา: ฉันใส่เสื้อตัวนี้แล้วเป็นยังไงบ้าง
  • แก้ว: เอ่อ…เสื้อสีสวยดี แต่ว่าตัวเมื่อกี๊ดีกว่านะ
  • bplaa: chǎn-sài-sûuea-dtuua-níi-láaeo-bpen-yàng-ngai-bâang
  • gâaeo: òoe…sûuea-sǐi-sǔuay-dii dtâae-wâa-dtuua-mûuea-gíi-dii-gwàa-ná
  • Pla: How do I look in this shirt?
  • Kaew: Ah… The color is nice, but I think the previous one you tried is better.

*In this case, Kaew was shocked when she saw Pla and thought she looked bad in the shirt. However, she didn’t want to make Pla feel bad, so she gave her opinion this way. (Thai people have the fear of เสียหน้า [sǐia-nâa] or “losing face.”)

Example 2

  • คนขาย: ลองชิมขนมชั้นดูมั้ยคะ อร่อยมากเลยนะคะ
  • คนซื้อ: น่าทานมากค่ะ ขอลองชิม 1 ชิ้นค่ะ
  • คนขาย: อร่อยมั้ยคะ ตอนนี้มีโปรโมชั่น 3 กล่อง 100 บาท รับ 3 กล่องเลยมั้ยคะ
  • คนซื้อ: เอ่อ…กล่องเดียวก็พอค่ะ 
  • khon-khǎai: laawng-chim-khà-nǒm-chán-duu-mái-khá à-ràauy-mâak-looei-ná-khá
  • khon-súue: nâa-thaan-mâak-khà khǎaw-laawng-chim-nùeng-chín-khà
  • khon-khǎai: à-ràauy-mái-khá dtaawn-níi-mii-bproo-moo-chân-sǎam-glàawng-nùeng-ráauy-bàat ráp- sǎam-glàawng-looei-mái-khá
  • khon-súue: òoe…glàawng-diiao-gâaw-phaaw-khà
  • Seller: Do you want to try ขนมชั้น (khà-nǒm-chán)? It is very delicious.
  • Buyer: It looks really good. I want to try one.
  • Seller: Delicious, right? Currently, we have a promotion: 3 boxes for 100 Baht. Do you want to buy 3 boxes?
  • Buyer: Ah… Just one would be enough.

*In this case, the buyer may not like the taste of ขนมชั้น (khà-nǒm-chán) and she definitely doesn’t want to buy any. However, Thai people have a trait called เกรงใจ (greeng-jai). Since she has already tried it, she has decided to buy one box despite its taste.

**ขนมชั้น (khà-nǒm-chán) is a Thai dessert. Its name means “layer snack,” because you can see its layers. 

4. หือ (hǔue)

Thai people use the filler หือ (hǔue) to show that they didn’t hear or understand what the other person said.

Example 1

  • ตาล: ช่วยหยิบของให้หน่อย
  • บอล: หือ…เมื่อกี้พูดว่าอะไรนะ
  • dtaan: chûuay-yìp-khǎawng-hâi-nàauy
  • baawn: hǔue…mûuea-gíi-phûut-wâa-à-rai-ná
  • Tarn: Please bring me that.
  • Ball: What did you just say?

Example 2

  • คนขาย: รับของหวานเพิ่มมั้ยคะ วันนี้มีไอศครีมชาเย็นค่ะ
  • คนซื้อ: หือ…พูดช้า ๆ อีกทีได้มั้ยคะ 
  • khon-khǎai: ráp-khǎawng-wǎan-phôoem-mái-khà wan-níi-mii-ai-sà-khriim-chaa-yen-khà
  • khon-súue: hǔue…phûut-cháa-cháa-ìik-thii-dâi-mái-khá 
  • Seller: Do you want a dessert? Today, we have Thai tea ice-cream.
  • Buyer: Can you speak again slowly?

5. อ่าฮะ (àa-há) – yep

We use อ่าฮะ (àa-há) in conversations to show that we understand what the other party has said, but we either don’t know what to reply or only reluctantly agree. 

Example 1

  • นักเรียน 1: งานกลุ่มครั้งนี้ ฉันจะทำส่วนนี้ เธอทำส่วนนี้แล้วกันนะ
  • นักเรียน 2: อ่าฮะ
  • nák-riian 1: ngaan-glùm-khráng-níi chǎn-jà-tham-sùuan-níi thooe-tham-sùuan-níi-láaeo-gan-ná
  • nák-riian 2: àa-há
  • Student 1: For this group project, I will do this part and you do this part.
  • Student 2: Yep.

Example 2

  • จันทร์: ฉันไม่ชอบล้างจาน เธอล้างจานแล้วกันนะ
  • นภา: อ่าฮะ
  • jan: chǎn-mâi-châawp-láang-jaan thooe-láang-jaan-láaeo-gan-ná
  • ná-phaa: àa-há
  • Chan: I don’t like washing dishes. You do it.
  • Napha: Yep.

6. แบบ (bàaep) – like

แบบ (bàaep) is a common filler in Thai, used when the speaker is thinking of how to explain something. 

Example 1

  • มินต์: เธอว่ายำจานนี้รสชาติโอเครึยัง ต้องเติมอะไรอีกมั้ย
  • น้ำ: เราว่ามันรสชาติแบบ…หวาน เปรี้ยว แต่ไม่ค่อยเค็ม เติมน้ำปลานิดหน่อยสิ
  • mín: thooe-wâa-yam-jaan-níi-rót-châat-oo-khee-rúe-yang dtâawng-dtooem-à-rai-èek-mái
  • nám: rao-wâa-man-rót-châat-bàaep…wǎan bprîiao dtàae-mâi-khâauy-khem dtooem-nám-bplaa- nít-nàauy-sì
  • Mint: Do you think this spicy salad tastes alright? Should I add anything?
  • Nam: I think it tastes…like sweet, sour, but not salty enough. You should add some fish sauce.

Example 2

  • เพลิน: เธอว่าหนังสือเล่มนี้เป็นยังไงบ้าง น่าซื้อมั้ย
  • พราว: ก็สนุกดี แต่มันแบบ…จบงง ๆ 
  • phlooen: thooe-wâa-nǎng-sǔue-lêm-níi-bpen-yang-ngai-bâag nâa-súue-mái
  • phraao: gâaw-sà-nùk-dii dtàae-man-bàaep…jòp-ngong-ngong
  • Ploen: What do you think about this book? Is it worth buying?
  • Praw: It is fun but its ending is…like, unclear.

A Woman Asking about a Book in a Bookstore

This book is fun but its ending is…like, unclear.

7. อย่างนี้นะ (yàang-níi-ná) – well

Thai people often use the filler phrase อย่างนี้นะ (yàang-níi-ná) before explaining something.

Example 1

  • ครู: ทำไมเธอถึงใช้ตารางในการอธิบาย
  • นักเรียน: อย่างนี้นะคะ หนูว่าถ้าใช้ตารางจะดูง่ายกว่า
  • khruu: tham-mai-thooe-thǔeng-chái-dtaa-raang-nai-gaan-à-thí-baai
  • nák-riian: yàang-níi-ná-khá nǔu-wâa-thâa-chái-dtaa-raang-jà-duu-ngâai-gwàa
  • Teacher: Why did you use tables in explanation?
  • Student: Well, I think it is easier to explain if I use tables.

Example 2

  • เปิ้ล: ทำไมถึงไม่ไปเที่ยวกับครอบครัวเมื่อวานหละ
  • ชมพู่: อย่างนี้นะ ช่วงนี้พู่งานเยอะมาก แล้วก็ไม่ค่อยสบาย เลยไม่ได้ไป
  • bpôoen: tham-mai-thǔeng-mâi-bpai-thîiao-gàp-khrâawp-khruua-mûuea-waan-là
  • chom-phûu: yàang-níi-ná chûuang-níi-phûu-ngaan-yóe-mâak láaeo-gâaw-mâi-khâauy-sà-baai looei- mâi-dâi-bpai
  • Ple: Why didn’t you travel with your family yesterday?
  • Chompu: Well, recently, I have a lot of work to do. Also, I didn’t feel well so I didn’t go.

8. อะไรแบบนี้ (à-rai-bàaep-níi) – stuff like that

Thai people often use the filler อะไรแบบนี้ (à-rai-bàaep-níi) when explaining things to others, especially if they can’t give as many examples as they would like to.

Example 1

  • ลูกค้า: ที่นี่มีบริการนวดแผนไทย หรืออะไรแบบนี้มั้ยคะ
  • พนักงาน: เรามีบริการนวดแผนไทยและนวดเท้าค่ะ
  • lûuk-kháa: thîi-nîi-mii-baaw-rí-gaan-nûuat-phǎaen-thai rǔue-à-rai-bàaep-níi-mái-khá
  • phá-nák-ngaan: rao-mii-baaw-rí-gaan-nûuat-phǎaen-thai-láe-nûuat-thǎao-khà
  • Customer: Are there Thai massages or stuff like that here?
  • Staff Member: We have Thai massage and foot massage.

A Woman Rubbing Her Neck in Pain

Are there Thai massages or stuff like that here?

Example 2

  • ส้ม: แม่คะ หนูหิว มีขนมปัง ผลไม้ หรืออะไรแบบนี้มั้ยคะ
  • แม่: มีกล้วยอยู่บนโต๊ะ
  • som: mâae-khá nǔu-hǐu mii-khà-nǒm-phang phǒn-lá-mái rǔue-à-rai-bàaep-níi-mái-khá
  • maae: mii-glûuay-yùu-bon-dtó
  • Son: Mom, I’m hungry. Is there any bread, fruit, or stuff like that?
  • Mother: There is a banana on the table.

9. คือว่า / พอดีว่า (khuue-wâa / phaaw-dii-wâa) – well

The filler phrases คือว่า / พอดีว่า (khuue-wâa / phaaw-dii-wâa) are often used when the speaker is talking about the events leading up to the current situation.

Example 1

  • หัวหน้า: ทำไมวันนี้มาสายคะ
  • พนักงาน: พอดีว่า เมื่อเช้ารถเสียค่ะ
  • hǔua-hnâa: tham-mai-wan-níi-maa-sǎai-khá
  • phá-nák-ngaan: phaaw-dii-wâa mûuea-cháao-rót-sǐia-khà
  • Boss: Why are you late today?
  • Employee: Well, my car broke this morning.

Example 2

  • พ่อ: ทำไมห้องนอนรกอย่างนี้
  • ลูก: คือว่า ช่วงนี้รายงานเยอะ หนูเลยไม่มีเวลาทำความสะอาดค่ะ
  • phâaw: tham-mai-hâawng-naawn-rók-yàang-níi
  • lûuk: khuue-wâa chûuang-níi-raai-ngaan-yóe nǔu-looei-mâi-mii-wee-laa-tham-kwaam-sà-àat-khà
  • Dad: Why is your bedroom so messy?
  • Daughter: Well, I have a lot of reports to do recently. I have no time to clean.

10. ประมาณว่า (bprà-maan-wâa) – like

Thai people often use ประมาณว่า (bprà-maan-wâa) when they want to explain something.

Example 1

  • หนึ่ง: ทำไมราณีซื้อบ้านหลังนี้หละ ไกลจากที่ทำงานออก
  • สอง: ราณีชอบ ประมาณว่า ราคาถูก และก็สวยดี
  • nùeng: tham-mai-raa-nii-súue-bâan-hlǎng-níi-là glai-jàak-thîi-tham-ngaan-àawk
  • sǎawng: raa-nii-châawp bprà-maan-wâa raa-khaa-thùuk láe-gâaw-sǔuay-dii
  • Nueng: Why did Ranee buy this house? It is so far from her workplace.
  • Song: She likes this house, like it is cheap and beautiful.

A Row of Three Houses in a Nice Suburban Area

She likes this house, like it is cheap and beautiful.

Example 2

  • อนันต์: ทำไมร้านนี้คนเยอะจัง
  • ฤดี: ร้านอาหารร้านนี้ดังมากค่ะ ประมาณว่า อาหารอร่อย ราคาไม่แพง 
  • a-nan: tham-mai-ráan-níi-khon-yóe-jang
  • rúe-dii: ráan-aa-hǎan-ráan-níi-dang-mâak-khà bprà-maan-wâa aa-hǎan-à-ràauy raa-khaa-mâi- phaaeng
  • Anan: Why is this restaurant so crowded?
  • Ruedee: This restaurant is so popular, like the food is delicious and it’s not expensive.

11. ก็ (gâaw) – because

We often use the Thai filler word ก็ (gâaw) to explain why we did something.

Example 1

  • กฤช: ทำไมซื้ออาหารมาเยอะขนาดนี้
  • มาโนช: ก็ตอนซื้อหิวมาก เลยซื้อมาเยอะ
  • grìt: tham-mai-súue-aa-hǎan-maa-yóe-khà-nàat-níi
  • ma-nôot: gâaw-dtaawn-súue-hǐu-mâak looei-súue-maa-yóe
  • Krit: Why did you buy this much food?
  • Manot: Because when I bought it, I was very hungry so I ended up buying a lot.

Example 2

  • แม่: ยิ้ม ทำไมตื่นสายขนาดนี้ วันนี้เราจะไปหาคุณยายกันนะ
  • ยิ้ม: ก็หนูลืม เดี๋ยวหนูรีบไปอาบน้ำเลย
  • mâae: yím tham-mai-dtùuen-sǎai-khà-nàat-níi wan-níi-rao-jà-bpai-hǎa-khun-yaai-gan-ná
  • yím: gâaw-nǔu-luuem dǐiao-nǔu-rîip-bpai-àap-nám-looei
  • Mother: Yim, why did you wake up so late? Today, we will go visit Grandmother.
  • Yim: Because I forgot. I will go take a bath now.

12. Conclusion

Congratulations! You’ve reached the end of our Thai filler word and phrase list. What do you think? Are Thai filler words different from filler words in your native language? Comment below to let us know.

While you should be able to speak more like a native with this new information, there’s so much more to learn before reaching fluency! If you want to keep studying and practicing, check out ThaiPod101.com. Not sure where to start? Learning about Thai idioms and slang expressions can make your speech sound even more natural and fluid.

Happy learning!

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Learn How to Say “I Love You,” in Thai

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There are several words and phrases that students of a foreign language learn early on: 

Hello.
Thank you.
I’m sorry.

And…

I love you.

Depending on how long you’ve been studying the language, you might already know how to say “I love you,” in Thai. But are you familiar with the more nuanced expressions, or how to take your romantic relationship a step further? 

Knowing love expressions in Thai is essential. Love is one of the most important emotions anyone could feel, so you should absolutely learn how to express it. 

In this article, we’ll teach you several essential Thai love phrases you can use in various situations. Whether you want to woo a Thai love interest or strengthen your existing relationship with a native speaker, the words and phrases here will be invaluable to you!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Pick-up Lines in Thai
  2. Thai Love Phrases for Her / Thai Love Phrases for Him
  3. Being Together and Getting Married
  4. Endearment Terms
  5. Sayings About Love in Thai
  6. Conclusion

1. Pick-up Lines in Thai 

If you’ve found yourself falling head over heels for a native Thai speaker, the following lines can help you get your foot in the door. There are two ways that Thai people usually begin flirting with someone: 

1) By asking if he or she is in a relationship.
2) By showing that they care about the person.

Below are a few Thai phrases for flirting you can start practicing right away.

1 – มีแฟนยัง

Pronunciation:
mii-faaen-yang

English translation:
Do you have a boyfriend/girlfriend?

Additional explanation:
Literally, แฟน (faaen) means “boyfriend” or “girlfriend” in Thai. However, Thai people can also use this word in reference to a husband or wife.

2 – [pronoun “I” or name] + อยากเป็นแฟน + [pronoun “you” or name]

Pronunciation: 
[pronoun “I” or name] + yàak-bpen-faaen + [pronoun “you” or name]

English translation: 
I want to be your boyfriend/girlfriend.

Additional explanation: 
In Thai, there are many ways you can refer to yourself or to other parties. You can call someone by name, use a nickname, or use the pronoun “I” or “you.”

3 – จีบได้มั๊ย

Pronunciation:
jìip-dâi-mái

English translation: 
Can I court you?

Additional explanation: 
Another way you can express your interest is to say this sentence directly to the one you’re interested in.

A Man Flirting with a Woman in a Cafe

Can I court you?

4 – เป็นยังไงบ้าง / ทำอะไรอยู่

Pronunciation: 
bpen-yang-ngai-bâang / tham-à-rai-yùu

English translation:
How are you? / What are you doing?

Additional explanation: 
By asking about your love interest’s daily life, you’re showing that you care about the person. If someone asks you these questions, it might be an indicator that they have feelings for you—but remember that it doesn’t mean you’re courting yet!

5 – เป็นห่วงนะ

Pronunciation:
bpen-hùuang-ná

English translation:
I care about you.

Additional explanation:  
This phrase can be used to show that you care about someone. Saying เป็นห่วง (bpen-hùuang) implies that you think about that person and want him/her to be happy and physically well.

6 – เหนื่อยมั๊ย

Pronunciation:
nùueai-mái

English translation:
Are you tired?

Additional explanation:
When you’re feeling down or tired, being asked if you’re tired/okay can sometimes make you feel better. If someone asks you this, it’s a good sign that they still care about you.

7 – ฝันดีนะ

Pronunciation:
fǎn-dii-ná

English translation:
Have a good dream.

Additional explanation:
Wishing someone good dreams shows that you care about them, even as they sleep.

2. Thai Love Phrases for Her / Thai Love Phrases for Him

Once your romantic relationship is more solid, it’s time to keep your partner hooked by expressing your affection each and every day. Below are several love expressions in Thai you can use to do so! 

8 – [pronoun “I” or name] + คิดถึง + [pronoun “you” or name]

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “I” or name] + khít-thǔeng + [pronoun “you” or name]

English translation:
I miss you.

A Woman Embracing a Man from Behind

I miss you.

9 – [pronoun “I” or name] + ชอบ + [pronoun “you” or name] + มากกว่าเพื่อน

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “I” or name] + châawp + [pronoun “you” or name] + mâak-gwàa-phûuean

English translation:  
I think of you as more than a friend.

Additional explanation:
This phrase literally means “I like you more than a friend,” but its equivalent in English is “I think of you as more than a friend.”

10 – [pronoun “I” or name] + หยุดคิดถึง + [pronoun “you” or name] + ไม่ได้

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “I” or name] + yùt-khít-thǔeng + [pronoun “you” or name] + mâi-dâi

English translation:
I can’t stop thinking about you.

11 – [pronoun “I” or name] + อยากเจอ + [pronoun “you” or name] + ตลอดเวลา

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “I” or name] + yàak-jooe + [pronoun “you” or name] + dtà-làawt-wee-laa

English translation:
I want to see you all the time.

Additional explanation:
You can use this Thai love phrase to imply that you miss the other person.

12 – [pronoun “I” or name] + ชอบ + [pronoun “you” or name]

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “I” or name] + châawp + [pronoun “you” or name]

English translation:
I like you.

Additional explanation:
If you want to emphasize that you like the person “very much,” you can add มาก (mâak) to the end of the sentence.

13 – [pronoun “I” or name] + รัก + [pronoun “you” or name]

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “I” or name] + rák + [pronoun “you” or name]

English translation:
I love you.

Additional explanation:
As with the Thai love phrase above, if you want to say “I love you very much,” or “I love you so much,” you can add มาก (mâak) to the end of the sentence.

14 – [pronoun “you” or name] + มีความหมายต่อ + [pronoun “I” or name] + มาก

Pronunciation:  
[pronoun “you” or name] + mii-khwaam-mǎai-dtàaw + [pronoun “I” or name] + mâak 

English translation:
You mean so much to me.

15 – [pronoun “I” or name] + ชอบอยู่กับ + [pronoun “you” or name]

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “I” or name] + châawp-yùu-gàp + [pronoun “you” or name]

English translation:
I like being with you.

Additional explanation:
If you feel like the previous Thai love phrases were too cheesy or intense, you can opt for this more subtle one instead!

16 – [pronoun “you” or name] + ทำให้ชีวิตของ + [pronoun “I” or name] + มีความหมาย

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “you” or name] + tham-hâi-chii-wít-khǎawng + [pronoun “I” or name] + mii- kwaam-mǎai 

English translation:
You make my life meaningful.

3. Being Together and Getting Married

Thailand is a family-oriented society. This means that if you’re in a serious relationship with a Thai person, you’ll have to meet and interact with your in-laws to some extent. As your relationship moves forward, learning the following phrases can be very helpful.

17 – [day] + [pronoun “you” or name] + ไปทานข้าวกับพ่อแม่ของ + [pronoun “I” or name] + ได้มั๊ย

Pronunciation:
[day] + [pronoun “you” or name] + bpai-thaan-khâao-gàp-phâaw-mâae-khǎawng + [pronoun “I” or name] + dâi-mái 

English translation:
Can you have a meal with my parents on…?

Additional explanation:
Thai people often meet their boyfriend’s or girlfriend’s parents for the first time in a restaurant setting. So if your boyfriend/girlfriend asks you this question, it implies that he/she takes the relationship seriously.

18 – ช่วงนี้พ่อแม่ของ + [pronoun “I” or name] + จะมาหา + [pronoun “you” or name] + มาเจอพ่อแม่ของ + [pronoun “I” or name] + หน่อยได้มั๊ย

Pronunciation:
chûuang-níi-phâaw-mâae-khǎawng + [pronoun “I” or name] + jà-maa-hǎa + [pronoun “you” or name] + maa-jooe-phâaw-mâae-khǎawng + [pronoun “I” or name] + nàauy-dâi-mái

English translation:
My parents will come to see me, can you come to meet them?

Additional explanation:
Thai people usually visit family members during the holidays, so if your lover doesn’t live with his/her parents, he/she may ask you this.

19 – [day] + [pronoun “you” or name] + สะดวกมาบ้าน + [pronoun “I” or name] + มั๊ย ผมอยากแนะนำคุณให้พ่อแม่รู้จัก

Pronunciation:
[day] + [pronoun “you” or name] + sà-dùuak-maa-bâan + [pronoun “I” or name] + mái phǒm-yàak-náe-nam-khun-hâi-phâaw-mâae-rùu-jàk

English translation:
Are you available to come to my home on…? I want to introduce you to my parents.

Additional explanation:  
Apart from restaurant meetings, it’s also common for Thai people to meet their lover’s parents at his/her home. This way, in addition to getting to know his/her family members, you’ll also get to see how they live their daily lives as well.

20 – ย้ายมาอยู่ด้วยกันนะ

Pronunciation:
yáai-maa-yùu-dûuay-gan-ná

English translation:
Let’s move in together.

Additional explanation:
Nowadays, Thai people are more open to the idea of lovers living together before getting married. So if your lover is quite open-minded about this, he/she may say yes.

21 – คุณอยากย้ายมาอยู่กับ + [pronoun “I” or name] + มั๊ย 

Pronunciation:  
khun-yàak-yáai-maa-yùu-gàp + [pronoun “I” or name] + mái

English translation:  
Do you want to move into my house?

Additional explanation:  
Another question you can ask your lover if you’d like them to move in with you.

22 – แต่งงานกันนะ 

Pronunciation:
dtàaeng-ngaan-gan-ná

English translation:
Will you marry me?

A Man Putting a Ring on a Woman’s Finger on Their Wedding Day

Will you marry me?

23 – [pronoun “you” or name] + อยากมีลูกมั๊ย

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “you” or name] + yàak-mii-lûuk-mái

English translation:
Do you want to have a baby?

Additional explanation:
If you want to start a family together, you should know first whether your lover wants a child as well. Some Thai people do not like kids and plan to have no children. So if you’re in a serious relationship, don’t forget to ask about this to make sure that you have the same family goals in terms of kids.

24 – [pronoun “I” or name] + อยากมีลูก คุณเห็นว่าอย่างไร

Pronunciation:
[pronoun “I” or name] + yàak-mii-lûuk khun-hěn-wâa-yàang-rai

English translation:
I want to have a baby. What do you think?

Additional explanation:
Another way you can ask for your partner’s opinion about having children together.

25 – เรามาวางแผนมีลูกกันเถอะ

Pronunciation:
rao-maa-waang-phǎaen-mii-lûuk-gan-thòe

English translation:
Let’s make a plan about babies.

Additional explanation:
You can use this sentence when you’re sure that your lover also wants to have a baby.

A Woman Breastfeeding Her Baby

Let’s make a plan about babies.

4. Endearment Terms

When it comes to terms of endearment in Thai, you’ll find that Thai people have some odd ways of expressing affection. While we do have terms like “my love” in Thai, there are also some endearment terms that may sound more like verbal abuse in other cultures. It’s just how Thai lovers refer to one another. Despite the meaning, you have to focus on the tone as well.

26 – ที่รัก

Pronunciation:
thîi-rák

English translation:
Darling

Additional explanation:
It can be used to refer to both men and women.

27 – เบบี๋ / บี๋

Pronunciation:
bee-bǐi / bǐi

English translation:
Baby

Additional explanation:
It can be used to refer to both men and women.

28 – อ้วน

Pronunciation:
ûuan

English translation:
Fat

Additional explanation:
This endearment term doesn’t sound nice at all, but Thai lovers do call one another this. Instead of using it in a negative or abusive way, they say it in a cute manner—like when you see a chubby puppy. It can be used to refer to both men and women.

29 – เหม่ง

Pronunciation:
mèng

English translation:
Wide forehead

Additional explanation:
Similar to อ้วน (ûuan), เหม่ง (mèng) is used as an affectionate term. Men often call their girlfriends this.

30 – เค้า / ตัวเอง

Pronunciation:
kháo / dtuua-eeng

English translation:
I / You

Additional explanation:
This is a very cute pronoun that Thai lovers use when talking to each other. เค้า (kháo) is “I” and ตัวเอง (dtuua-eeng) is “you.” These two words can be used for both men and women.

31 – พี่ / หนู

Pronunciation:  
phîi / nǔu

English translation:
I (male) / You (female)

Additional explanation:
This is another pronoun pair that Thai lovers use when the male is older than the female. พี่ (phîi) is “brother” and หนู (nǔu) is “I,” used when the speaker is younger than the other party.

32 – พ่อ / แม่

Pronunciation:
phâaw / mâae

English translation:
Father / Mother

Additional explanation:  
When a couple have children together, they sometimes change the way they call each other to พ่อ (phâaw) and แม่ (mâae).

5. Sayings About Love in Thai 

To sound more like a native and to gain more insight into romance in Thai culture, you should also learn some Thai idioms about love as well as popular Thai love quotes

33 – ดื่มน้ำผึ้งพระจันทร์

Pronunciation:
dùuem-náam-phûeng-phrá-jan

Literal translation:
drink honey moon

English translation:
honeymoon

Additional explanation:
This Thai idiom refers to a “honeymoon,” with nearly the same meaning as the English word.

34 – ข้าวใหม่ปลามัน

Pronunciation:
khâao-mài-bplaa-man

Literal translation: 
new rice, oily fish

English translation:  
newlywed

Additional explanation:
This Thai idiom is used to refer to a couple who has just gotten married.

ข้าวใหม่ปลามัน

35 – น้ำตาลใกล้มด

Pronunciation:
náฟm-dtaan-glâi-mót

Literal translation: 
sugar near ant

English translation:
If a man and a woman spend a lot of time together, they can fall in love.

Additional explanation:
This Thai idiom is used to explain that if a man and a woman are close to each other, there is a higher chance of them falling in love.

36 – ยามรักน้ำต้มผักยังว่าหวาน

Pronunciation:
yaam-rák-náam-dtôm-phàk-yang-wâa-wǎan

Literal translation:
Soup made with vegetables is sweet when you are in love.

English translation:
When you are in love, everything about your lover is good.

Additional explanation:
This Thai idiom compares couples when they’ve just fallen in love to someone eating vegetable soup and thinking it’s sweet. In other words, you think that everything about your lover is good simply because you love him or her.

37 – รัก คิดถึง แค่คำสั้น ๆ แต่มีความสุขทุกครั้งที่พูดมันออกไป

Pronunciation:
rák khít-thǔeng khâae-kham-sân-sân dtàae-mii-kwaam-sùk-thúk-khráng-thîi-phûut- man-àawk-bpai

English translation:
“Love,” “miss you,” they are just short words but I’m happy every time you say them.

38 – ความสัมพันธ์ที่ดี จะไม่ทำให้เราต้องมีคำถามใด ๆ ในความสัมพันธ์เลย

Pronunciation:  
kwaam-sǎm-phan-thîi-dii jà-mâi-tham-hâi-rao-dtâwng-mii-kham-thǎam-dai-dai- nai-kwam-sǎm-phan-looei

English translation:  
A good relationship is a relationship that you have no question about.

39 – ชอบ คือ ถูกใจในข้อดี รัก คือ ยินดีรับในข้อเสีย

Pronunciation:
châawp-khuue-thùuk-jai-nai-khâaw-dii rák-khuue-yin-dii-ráp-nai-khâaw-sǐia

English translation:
“Like” is liking the good part of someone. “Love” is accepting the bad part of someone.

40 – จงอยู่กับคนที่แสดงความรักให้เห็น มากกว่าคนที่แค่พูดให้ได้ยิน

Pronunciation: 
jong-yùu-gàp-khon-thîi-sà-daaeng-kwaam-rák-hâi-hěn mâak-gwàa-khon-thîi-khâae- phûut-hâi-dâi-yin

English translation:
Be with a person who shows you his/her love, not the one who just speaks it.

6. Conclusion

This is the end of the article. We hope you were able to pick up a few love phrases in Thai, some other romantic words, and even a couple of sweet quotes! Even if you can’t remember all of these Thai love phrases yet, you should now have more confidence in your ability to express your romantic feelings! 

What did you think about this lesson? Is the way Thai people express their love different from how it’s done in your country? Leave us a comment below to share your thoughts.

If you would like to continue learning Thai love words and phrases, or want to further explore romance in Thai society, make sure to check out the following pages on ThaiPod101.com: 

Happy learning, and wishing you success in your love life!

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Negation in Thai: Learn How to Form Negative Sentences

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One of the first words a baby learns to say is “no.” 

It turns out that this little word will come in handy for the rest of our lives! We use it to express our needs, wants, and boundaries on a daily basis. Whether saying no comes as naturally to you as breathing or you consider yourself a people-pleaser, one thing is certain: 

As a Thai learner, it’s crucial that you learn how to negate in Thai! 

“Negation” refers to the act of making a positive (or affirmative) statement negative, and this is a crucial skill to have for any conversation. It allows you to tell others no, answer questions negatively, and much more. 

In this article, we’ll teach you everything you need to know about Thai negation. You’ll learn about the rules and steps involved, pick up some useful negation words and phrases, and even gain some cultural insight along the way.

    → Before we start, you may want to look at our article about Thai tenses. This topic plays a large role in negation, so we recommend becoming familiar with it before diving into this article!
Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. An Overview of Negation in Thai
  2. Other Words of Negation in Thai
  3. Thai People and Negation
  4. Conclusion

1. An Overview of Negation in Thai 

The Thai word for “negation” is: 

Literally, this word refers to the action of saying no to someone or something. This word is also used as part of a longer phrase (ประโยคปฎิเสธ) which means “negative sentence.”

Fortunately for you, Thai grammar is very easy. Things like gender and number do not affect the structure of Thai sentences at all, and negating in Thai is as simple as adding the word “no” or “not” to the sentence. 

Below are several different ways you can make a sentence negative in Thai. 

1 – Negating Affirmative Sentences [present tense]

Negation particle used: 
ไม่ (mâi) = not

How to negate:
Subject + ไม่ (mâi) + Verb + Object [if any]

Example 1:
แม่ไม่ชอบสีแดง
mâae-mâi-châawp-sǐi-daaeng
Mom doesn’t like the color red.

Example 2:
ฤดีพรไม่เรียนไวโอลินวันเสาร์
rúe-dii-paawn-mâi-riian-wai-oo-lin-wan-sǎo
Ruedeepron doesn’t learn violin on Saturday.

2 – Negating Affirmative Sentences [past tense]

Negation particle used: ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) = not

How to negate:
Subject + ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) + Verb + Object [if any]
Subject + ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) + เพิ่ง (phôeng) + Verb + Object [if any]

Example 1:
ตุลย์ไม่ได้ไปโรงเรียนเมื่อวานนี้
dtun-mâi-dâi-bpai-roong-riian-mûuea-waan-níi
Tun didn’t go to school yesterday.

Example 2:
น้าไม่ได้ซื้อนมมาจากตลาด
náa-mâi-dâi-súue-nom-maa-jàak-dtà-làat
Aunt didn’t buy milk from the market.

Example 3:
ครูไม่ได้เพิ่งสั่งงานมา ทำไมยังทำไม่เสร็จ
khruu-mâi-dâi-phôeng-sàng-ngaan-maa tham-mai-yang-tham-mâi-sèt
The teacher didn’t just order the work. Why isn’t your work finished yet?

Example 4:
แก้วไม่ได้เพิ่งเริ่มเรียนภาษาจีน เธอเรียนมาแล้วสามปี จึงพูดภาษาจีนได้ดี
gâaeo-mâi-dâi-phôeng-rôem-riian-phaa-sǎa-jiin thooe-riian-maa-láaeo-sǎam-bpii jueng-phûut-phaa- sǎa-jiin-dâi-dii
Kaew didn’t just start learning Chinese. She has learned it for 3 years now so she can speak it well.

3 – Negating Affirmative Sentences [future tense]

Negation particle used: 
ไม่ (mâi) = not

How to negate:
Subject + จะ () + ไม่ (mâi) + Verb + Object [if any]

Example 1:
ณัฐจะไม่ไปพัทยาวันอังคารหน้า
nát-jà-mâi-bpai-phát-thá-yaa-wan-ang-khaan-nâa
Nut will not go to Pattaya next Tuesday.

Example 2:
พ่อจะไม่ทานข้าวเย็นกับพวกเราวันนี้
phâaw-jà-mâi-thaan-khâao-yen-gàp-phûuak-rao-wan-níi
Dad will not have dinner with us today.

4 – Negating Affirmative Sentences [present continuous tense]

Negation particle used:
ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) = not

How to negate:
Subject + ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) + กำลัง (gam-lang) + Verb + Object [if any]

Example 1:
นักเรียนไม่ได้กำลังเรียนหนังสืออยู่
nák-riian-mâi-dâi-gam-lang-riian-nǎng-sǔue-yùu
The student is not studying now.

Example 2:
เด็ก ๆ ไม่ได้กำลังนอนอยู่
dèk-dèk-mâi-dâi-gam-lang-naawn-yùu
The kids are not sleeping now.

5 – Negating Affirmative Sentences [perfect tense]

Negation particle used:
ไม่ (mâi) = not
ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) = not

How to negate:
Subject + ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) + Verb + Object [if any] + มา (maa) or ตั้งแต่ (dtâng-dtàae) + Time
Subject + ไม่ (mâi) + เคย (khooei) + Verb + Object [if any]

Example 1:
การะเกดไม่ได้ทำงานมา 3 วันแล้ว เธอป่วย
gaa-rá-gèet-mâi-dâi-tham-ngaan-maa-sǎam-wan-láaeo thooe-bpùuai
Garaget hasn’t worked for 3 days now. She is sick.

Garaget Hasn’t Worked for 3 Days Now. She Is Sick.

Example 2:
พิพัฒน์ไม่ได้อ่านหนังสือมาหลายอาทิตย์แล้ว เขายุ่งมาก
phí-phát-mâi-dâi-àan-nǎng-sǔue-maa-lǎai-aa-thít-láaeo khǎo-yûng-mâak
Pipat hasn’t read any books for many weeks now. He is very busy.

Example 3:
รำไพไม่เคยไปประเทศเกาหลี
ram-phai-mâi-khooei-bpai-phrà-thêet-gao-lǐi
Ramphai has never been to Korea.

Example 4:
ตั้มไม่เคยกินผลไม้ชนิดนี้มาก่อน
dtâm-mâi-khooei-gin-phǒn-lá-mái-chá-nít-níi-maa-gàawn
Tum has never eaten this kind of fruit before.

6 – The Negation of “Can” in Thai

Negation particle used:
ไม่ (mâi) = not
ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) = not

How to negate:
Subject + ไม่ (mâi) + สามารถ (sǎa-mâat) + Verb + Object [if any] + ได้ (dâi)
Subject + Verb + Object [if any] + ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi)

Example 1:
นทีไม่สามารถกินเผ็ดได้
ná-thii-mâi-sǎa-mâat-gin-phèt-dâi
Nathi can’t eat spicy food.

Example 2:
นทีกินเผ็ดไม่ได้
ná-thii-gin-phèt-mâi-dâi
Nathi can’t eat spicy food.

Example 3:
ปริณไม่สามารถขับรถได้
bpà-rin-mâi-sǎa-mâat-khàp-rót-dâi
Prin can’t drive.

Example 4:
ปริณขับรถไม่ได้
bpà-rin-khàp-rót-mâi-dâi
Prin can’t drive.

Additional note: 
These two Thai negation patterns are completely interchangeable! The meaning of the sentence will not change if you use one instead of the other.

7 – Negating Thai Adjectives and Adverbs

Negation particle used: 
ไม่ (mâi) = not

How to negate:
ไม่ (mâi) + adjective / adverb

Example 1:
เสื้อตัวนี้ราคาไม่แพง
sûuea-dtuua-níi-raa-khaa-mâi-phaaeng
This shirt is not expensive.

This Shirt Is not Expensive.

Example 2:
คุณตาเดินไม่เร็ว เพราะ พื้นลื่น
khun-dtaa-dooen-mâi-reo-phráw-phúuen-lûuen
Grandpa doesn’t walk fast because of the slippery floor.

8 – Giving Negative Instructions and Commands

Negation particle used:
ห้าม (hâam) = do not
อย่า (yàa) = do not

How to negate:
ห้าม (hâam) + Verb + Object [if any]
อย่า (yàa) + Verb + Object [if any]

Example 1:
ห้ามเข้า
hâam-khâo
Do not enter.

Example 2:
ห้ามใส่กางเกงขาสั้น
hâam-sài-gaang-geeng-khǎa-sân
Do not wear shorts.

Example 3:
อย่ากลับบ้านดึกนะ
yàa-glàp-bâan-dùek-ná
Do not come home late.

Example 4:
อย่าใส่พริกเยอะ เดี๋ยวจะเผ็ดเกินไป
yàa-sài-phrík-yóe dǐiao-jà-phèt-gooen-bpai
Do not add too much chili or else it will be too spicy.

Additional note:
Both ห้าม (hâam) and อย่า (yàa) are commonly used when giving negative commands in Thai. However, the two are slightly different in meaning. ห้าม (hâam) is used when giving a strong order, while อย่า (yàa) is typically used for giving a suggestion.

9 – Answering Yes-or-No Questions

Negation particle used:
ไม่ (mâi) = no

How to negate:
ไม่ (mâi) + Verb in the question

Example 1

Question:
เธอจะเอาขนมหวานมั๊ย
thooe-jà-ao-khà-nǒm-wǎan-mái
Do you want dessert?

Answer:
ไม่เอา
Mâi-ao
No, I don’t

Example 2

Question:
มะลิชอบสีเขียวมั๊ย
má-lí-châawp-sǐi-khǐiao-mái
Does Mali like the color green?

Answer:
ไม่ชอบ
mâi-châawp
No, she doesn’t.

Additional note: 
Sometimes questions end with รึเปล่า (rǔe-plào), which is a casual version of ใช่หรือไม่ (châi-rǔue-mâi) meaning “yes or no.” To answer negatively in this case, you would say เปล่า (plào), meaning “no.”

10 – Double Negation in Thai

Negation particle used:
ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) = not
ไม่ใช่ (mâi-châi) = not

How to negate:
ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) or ไม่ใช่ (mâi-châi) + Normal negation form

Example 1

Question:
เธอไม่ชอบฉันเหรอ
thooe-mâi-châawp-chǎn-rǎaw
Do you not like me?

Answer:
ฉันไม่ได้ไม่ชอบเธอ
chǎn-mâi-dâi-mâi-châawp-thooe
I don’t dislike you.

Example 2

Question:
ไอศครีมร้านนี้ไม่อร่อยเหรอ
Ai-sà-khriim-ráan-níi-mâi-à-hràauy-rǎaw
Does ice cream at this shop not taste good?

Answer:
ไอศครีมร้านนี้ ไม่ใช่ไม่อร่อย แต่แพงเกินไป
ai-sà-khriim-ráan-níi mâi-châi-mâi-à-ràauy-dtàae-phaaeng-gooen-bpai
The ice cream at this shop is good but too expensive.

This Ice Cream Is Delicious but Too Expensive.

Additional note:
Thai people often use double negation when answering questions. You can use both ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi) and ไม่ใช่ (mâi-châi), as there’s no difference in meaning between the two words.

2. Other Words of Negation in Thai

Of course, there might be situations where you want to give a stronger (or more colorful) negative response. Following are several words and phrases you can use to add flavor to your speech and sound more like a native speaker. 

1 – ไม่มีทาง

Pronunciation:
mâi-mii-thaang

Literal translation:
No way

Explanation:
This phrase is used exactly like “no way” is in English. It’s used to express that you strongly disagree with an offer.

Example 1:
ไม่มีทางที่ฉันจะให้เธอยืมเงิน
mâi-mii-thaang-thîi-chǎn-jà-hâi-thooe-yuuem-ngoen
There is no way that I will let you borrow my money.

Example 2:
ไม่มีทางที่ปราณแต่งงานกับอรณี เขาไม่ชอบเธอ
Mâi-mii-thaang-thîi-bpraan-jà-dtàaeng-ngaan-gàp-aawn-rá-nii khǎo-mâi-châawp-thooe
There is no way that Pran will marry Onranee. He doesn’t like her.

2 – หัวเด็ดตีนขาดก็ไม่…

Pronunciation:
hǔa-dèt-dtiin-khàat-gâaw-mâi-…(verb)

Literal translation:
Even my head and leg are cut, still no.

Explanation:
This phrase is stronger than the one above. It means that even if someone tries to force you into agreement by threatening to cut off your leg or head, you’ll still say no.

Example 1:
หัวเด็ดตีนขาดก็ไม่ไป
hǔa-dèt-dtiin-khàat-gâaw-mâi-bpai
I WON’T GO.

Example 2:
ข้อเสนอบ้าบออย่างนี้ หัวเด็ดตีนขาดก็ไม่ตกลง
khâaw-sà-nǒoe-bâa-baaw-yàang-níi hǔa-dèt-dtiin-khàat-gâaw-mâi-dtòk-long
I WON’T AGREE with this ridiculous offer.

3 – ฝันเอา / ฝันไปเถอะ

Pronunciation:
fǎn-ao / fǎn-bpai-thòe

Literal translation:
Dream it

Explanation:
This phrase is used much the same way as the English phrase “in your dreams.”

Example 1:
ฝันไปเถอะ ยังไงฉันก็ไม่ตกลง
fǎn-bpai-thòe yang-ngai-chǎn-gâaw-mâi-dtòk-long
You have to dream it. I won’t agree nonetheless.

Example 2:
ใครจะไปซื้อไหว แพงขนาดนั้น ฝันเอาแล้วกัน
khrai-jà-bpai-súue-wǎi phaaeng-khà-nàat-nán fǎn-ao-láaeo-gan
Who will be able to buy that? It is that expensive. You have to dream it.

4 – บ้ง

Pronunciation:
bông

Literal translation:
Worm

Slang translation:
Not good

Explanation:
This is a slang term used among youngsters. It means “not okay.”

Example 1:
เธอใส่ชุดนี้แล้วบ้งมาก ไม่ควรซื้อ
thooe-sài-chút-níi-láaeo-bông-mâak mâi-khuuan-súue
You don’t look good in this dress, so you shouldn’t buy it.

Example 2:
วันนี้ขายของไม่ได้เลย บ้งมาก
wan-níi-khǎai-khǎawng-mâi-dâi-looei bông-mâak
I can’t sell anything today, not good.

5 – มองบน

Pronunciation:
maawng-bon

Literal translation:
Look up

Slang translation:
Not happy with something

Explanation:
This is another slang term used by youngsters. It’s used to imply that one is not happy with something.

Example 1:
เธอได้ยินปัญหาแล้วก็อดมองบนไม่ได้
thooe-dâi-yin-bpan-hǎa-láaeo-gâaw-òt-maawng-bon-mâi-dâi
Once she heard of the problem, she was not happy with it.

Example 2:
ทำไม่ต้องมองบนขนาดนั้น
tham-mai-dtâawng-maawng-bon-khà-nàat-nán
Why are you that unhappy?

6 – เซ็งเป็ด

Pronunciation:
seng-bpèt

Literal translation:
Bore of the duck

Slang translation:
Not in a good mood

Explanation:
This slang term is used to say that you’re not in a good mood or that something has put you in a bad mood.

Example 1:
เห็นงานที่ต้องทำแล้วเซ็งเป็ดเลย
hěn-ngaan-thîi-dtâawng-tham-láaeo-seng-bpèt-looei
I’m not in a good mood now after seeing the work that I have to do.

I’m Not in a Good Mood Now After Seeing the Work that I Have to Do.

Example 2:
อากาศแบบนี้ออกไปข้างนอกไม่ได้ เซ็งเป็ด
aa-gàat-bàaep-níi-àawk-bpai-khâang-nâawk-mâi-dâi seng-bpèt
I can’t go out in this weather. I’m not in a good mood now.

3. Thai People and Negation

Now that you know how to properly use negation in Thai, there are a couple of cultural aspects you should be aware of. 

1 – เกรงใจ

เกรงใจ (greeng-jai) is a trait that many Thai people possess. This word refers to the feeling of not wanting to disturb, inconvenience, or cause problems for another person. Someone who feels เกรงใจ (greeng-jai) will find it hard to say “no” to someone who has asked a favor of them. They may also try to make life as easy as possible for others. 

For example, imagine that a Thai person is visiting their neighbor’s home. If the neighbor asks this person if they would like anything to drink, the person may feel เกรงใจ (greeng-jai). As a result, they might ask for something simple (like plain water or juice) even if they would prefer something else (like a smoothie or cocktail). 

If you were asked a favor by a coworker in the workplace to assist his/her tasks, in the case that you were feeling เกรงใจ (greeng-jai), you might end up agreeing to help that coworker complete their tasks—even if you already had a lot of work to do and needed to stay overtime for that. This is because saying “no” would hurt the feelings of your coworker.

So, when you ask a Thai person to do something, you have to look at their body language as well. If they look reluctant but still say yes, you should know that they are เกรงใจ (greeng-jai) and may not actually be willing to help.

Thai People Can’t Say No

2 – Using Negation to Save Someone’s Feelings

Sometimes, saying things directly can hurt other people’s feelings. To avoid doing so, Thai people use negation in order to convey the same message in a more indirect manner.  

Example 1: เตี้ย

Saying that someone is short can hurt that person’s feelings. Instead, you could use “not tall” instead of “short.”

  • เขาเตี้ย
  • khǎo-dtîia
  • He is short.
  • เขาตัวไม่สูง
  • khǎo-mâi-sǔung
  • He is not tall.

Example 2: ถูก

Since quality and price are often related, some Thai people feel that saying that something is cheap is like looking down on its quality. So instead of using “cheap,” you could use “not expensive.”

  • อาหารร้านนี้ถูกมาก
  • aa-hǎan-ráan-níi-thùuk-mâak
  • The food at this restaurant is very cheap.
  • อาหารร้านนี้ราคาไม่แพง
  • aa-hǎan-ráan-níi-raa-khaa-mâi-phaaeng
  • The food at this restaurant is not expensive.

4. Conclusion

As you can see, Thai negation is relatively simple. The only thing you really need to worry about is how to correctly use the negating words ไม่ (mâi), ไม่ได้ (mâi-dâi), and ไม่ใช่ (mâi-châi). It might take some time, but with enough practice you’ll become familiar with them. 

What are your thoughts on this lesson? Did you find it difficult, or was this pretty easy for you? And how does negation in Thai differ from that in your language? 

We look forward to hearing from you! 

If you would like to continue learning about the Thai language and culture, make sure to explore ThaiPod101.com and create your free lifetime account today. Not sure where to start? How about you try these lessons:

Happy learning!

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How Long Does it Take to Learn Thai?

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If you’re like most aspiring language learners, you’ve probably asked this all-too-common question at some point: How long does it take to learn Thai? 

Thai is not an easy language to learn, especially for a native English speaker. You’ll have to learn a whole new reading and writing system, study a new set of grammar rules, and—most difficult of all—get the hang of Thai pronunciation. Fortunately, the grammar part is pretty simple as there’s no verb conjugation to worry about (tense, mood, and gender play no role here).  

Taking the language’s difficulty into consideration, what kind of time commitment should you expect? 

In this article, we’ll take a look at the three different levels of Thai fluency: beginner, intermediate, and advanced. For each level, we will provide a list of abilities the learner should have at that stage (based on the CU-TFL test for non-native speakers). In addition, we’ll talk about the different factors that can influence your progress and give you tips on how to learn the Thai language faster. 

Let’s go!

How Long Does It Take to Learn Thai?
Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Factors That Affect Your Thai Language Learning
  2. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Beginner Level?
  3. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Intermediate Level?
  4. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Advanced Level?
  5. Conclusion

1. Factors That Affect Your Thai Language Learning

Before we get ahead of ourselves, you should know that there’s no concrete answer regarding how long it takes to learn Thai. There are many factors that can affect your Thai learning progress:

  • Where you live.

    If you live in Thailand or visit the country often, you’ll naturally become more familiar with the Thai language. This frequent exposure will help you pick up basic words and phrases, and get you acquainted with Thai pronunciation.
  • Whether you have Thai people in your life.

    One of the best ways to gain Thai speaking skills is to practice with native speakers. If you have family members, friends, or colleagues who are Thai, you can pick up the language much more quickly!
  • Your reasons for learning the language.

    Why are you learning Thai? If you chose to learn Thai for personal reasons, such as interest in the culture or a loved one who speaks the language, you’re more likely to learn it well!
  • Your opportunities to use Thai.

    The more you use the language, the better your language skills will become. By practicing what you learn, you’re allowing yourself to internalize the information and concepts—the ultimate key to success!
  • Your learning ability.

    Is langu1age learning your specialty, or are you better at math and science? Are you a fast learner in general? How’s your memory? Your learning experience and abilities have a massive effect on how long it will take you to learn Thai.
  • Your learning resources and methods.

    Who’s teaching you Thai? What materials are you using? Having good Thai learning resources for your studies is like having a good car for driving: It will help you get to your destination faster and with fewer issues.

To put it simply: If you’re in a good environment for learning Thai, you can learn it faster.

2. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Beginner Level?

So, how long does it take to learn basic Thai? 

It should take around 500 hours (20 weeks if you study 25 hours a week).  

Thai Skills Needed for Beginner Level

In order to reach the beginner level, there are a few skills you’ll need to master. 

Reading: 

  • Memorize all characters of the Thai script. 
  • Memorize the vocabulary used in daily life.
  • Understand basic phrases and sentences. 
  • Read and understand signs written in basic language.
  • Understand basic written orders and instructions.
  • Understand vocabulary associated with the characteristics of objects, people, and places.

Listening: 

  • Understand short, simple sentences.
  • Understand the phrases used in day-to-day conversations.
  • Memorize key phrases used during social interactions.

Speaking: 

  • Use simple words and sentence structures to make basic conversation. 
  • Communicate effectively in daily life.

Writing: 

  • Write simple words, phrases, or sentences used in daily life.
  • You tend to use the same simple sentence structures over and over again.
  • You will probably make a lot of spelling and spacing mistakes.  

Learning Tips for Beginners

500 hours is a long time! But luckily for you, we’re here with some tips on how to learn basic Thai more effectively. 

  • Memorize all 44 consonants and 21 vowels early on.

    Instead of learning with romanization, you should learn all of the Thai characters right from the start. Doing so will make Thai pronunciation easier for you to master. A great way to really internalize them is to listen to and repeat after the alphabet songs Thai children listen to.
  • Practice the five tones.

    The hardest part of learning Thai is the pronunciation, especially when it comes to the tones. In Thai, the consonant and vowel sounds combine with one of five tones in order to form different words. Practicing these five tones early on will help you become familiar with them from the start, and help you make faster progress later on!
  • Memorize the most important vocabulary used in daily life.

    Beginner-level students should be able to make and understand day-to-day conversations, so it’s very important to remember key vocabulary. Using flashcards and trying to remember words and phrases based on category is a great idea at this point.
  • Listen to Thai songs.

    Listening to Thai songs is a great way to become familiar with the pronunciation, even if you can’t understand the lyrics. This is an enjoyable study method that you can do at the same time as other activities: during your morning routine, on the way to work, while exercising, etc. It won’t take long for you to find yourself pleasantly surprised at how much vocabulary you’ve picked up through songs!
I Love Thai Songs.
  • Watch educational kids’ shows or cartoons.

    Even Thai children pick up the language through educational shows and cartoons, which makes this a wonderful learning resource for non-native beginners.
  • Read kids’ tales or stories.

    Stories for children are often written using simple language, which makes them good for both reading and pronunciation practice.

How ThaiPod101 Can Help

ThaiPod101.com is the best place to learn Thai online. In addition to our recommended lesson pathways for beginners, we have plenty of fun and effective resources you can take advantage of from Day One! 

  • Our Thai Alphabet Video

    If you’ve just started learning Thai, we recommend beginning with our Thai alphabet video. As mentioned earlier, learning the Thai alphabet should be your first priority as this will speed up your progress and make your continued studies easier. We have a few lessons and articles on our website covering this topic, but many new students benefit from visual and auditory learning. Click the link above to visit our Thai alphabet video on YouTube!
  • ThaiPod101 YouTube Channel

    Speaking of YouTube, have you been to our channel? We provide fun, engaging content on a range of topics, from vocabulary and pronunciation to culture!
  • Flashcards

    Wondering how to learn Thai vocabulary effectively? Use the spaced repetition flashcards on our website to memorize new words and phrases via a proven method!
  • Painless Thai Grammar

    Our Painless Thai Grammar lesson is the perfect place to get some useful tips on how to learn the more difficult grammar concepts. However, we also have tons of other lessons on various Thai grammar points! You may find it useful to write three original sentences after each lesson, applying the concept(s) you just learned; this will help you ensure you understood the lesson correctly.
  • Introduction to Thai Writing

    If you aren’t sure how to learn Thai writing, we recommend visiting our Introduction to Thai Writing page. Here, you’ll find all of the information you need to know as a beginner. Learning to write in Thai will be even easier with the help of a native speaker, so you may want to upgrade to Premium PLUS and utilize our MyTeacher service. This way, you can practice writing sentences and then send them to your personal teacher for feedback!
Write Three Original Sentences for Your Teacher.
  • Ultimate Thai Pronunciation Guide

    Another page you should visit is our Ultimate Thai Pronunciation Guide. This lesson will provide you with all of the basics you need to know, so you can get a good headstart on your learning. It will be hard to get the pronunciation and tones correct by yourself, so you should record yourself speaking and send the audio to your teacher for feedback.

3. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Intermediate Level?

How long does it take to learn intermediate-level Thai? It should take around 1,100 hours (44 weeks if you study 25 hours a week). Following is a breakdown of what you should know… 

Thai Skills Needed for Intermediate Level

To complete the intermediate level, here are the Thai language skills you need to have. 

Reading:

  • Understand short essays or stories on topics that interest you (or that you’re specialized in) with long and complicated sentences.   
  • Identify the main idea of an essay or story. 
  • Understand the context of a sentence.

Listening:  

  • Understand stories when spoken in a clear fashion at normal speed.
  • You might still be unable to understand long and complicated stories.

Speaking: 

  • Use both formal and informal language when speaking, and offer opinions on topics that are familiar to you.
  • Communicate with Thai people on less-familiar topics (though you might struggle) and use some non-verbal language.

Writing:  

  • Write essays with a good flow in terms of time, ideas, and logic.
  • Use conjunctions in essays and other texts.
  • Describe, explain, and give information via writing.
  • You might still make some mistakes in spelling, spacing, and word choice.

Learning Tips for Intermediate-Level Students

Reaching this level is a huge time commitment, but we have a few tips on how to learn Thai more quickly. 

  • Read short stories or essays on topics that interest you.

    To write well, you should start by reading so you become more familiar with sentence structure and how to use conjunctions. By reading stories or essays that match your interests, you’ll make the process more enjoyable and might be able to memorize even more vocabulary.
  • Translate short stories or essays.

    This will allow you to pick up more useful vocabulary and become familiar with things like conjunctions and essay structures. As with the tip above, you should make sure to pick short stories or essays on topics that fascinate you. For example, if you like cooking, try translating your special recipe into Thai.
  • Watch Thai TV shows, movies, or dramas.

    Watching Thai TV shows, movies, or dramas is a great way to practice listening and become more familiar with how Thai people speak in various situations.
Thai Movies Are Fun.

How ThaiPod101 Can Help 

ThaiPod101.com has plenty of useful resources for intermediate learners, too! Here are just a few recommended pages and tools for you. 

  • 5 Tips to Reach Intermediate Level 

    If you’re feeling stuck at the beginner stage, listen to these five tips from Alisha on how to finally move forward to the intermediate level.
  • Intermediate-Level YouTube Videos

    Of course, our YouTube channel features plenty of fun and educational videos designed for intermediate-level learners. Check it out!

4. How Long Does it Take to Achieve Advanced Level?

To become completely fluent in Thai, you’ll need to put in a whopping 2,500 hours (100 weeks if you study 25 hours a week). Here’s everything you should know about reaching the advanced level. 

Thai Skills Needed for Advanced Level

Reading:

  • Understand both academic and non-academic texts on a variety of topics, featuring both complex and simple sentences. 
  • Know and be able to use Thai idioms, proverbs, and other sayings that aren’t used much in daily life.

Listening: 

  • Understand both academic and non-academic stories, even when the speaker talks quickly. 
  • Understand the tone of the speaker and the cultural/societal context within the story. 

Speaking: 

  • Use formal/informal language as required by the situation. 
  • Communicate well on a variety of topics. 
  • Give explanations and opinions, influence and persuade others, and make compromises. 
  • Use all Thai vocabulary and grammar correctly, including slang, idioms, and proverbs.
  • Have a good understanding of Thai culture and apply this to your speech. 

Writing:

  • Write essays on various topics.
  • Explain, discuss, share opinions, and do creative writing.
  • Use suitable words and sentence structures, as well as idioms, proverbs, and other Thai sayings.
  • Write essays with good flow in terms of time, ideas, and logic, with a solid conclusion at the end.

Learning Tips for Advanced Students

  • Read and summarize academic essays.

    You likely have no problem with non-academic topics at this point, so you should focus on the academic part. By reading and summarizing essays written in Thai, you can learn new words and structures and practice writing.
  • Watch or listen to Thai news.

    Listening to something more formal like the news will help you become familiar with academic vocabulary that’s less common in daily life.
  • Watch Thai TV shows, movies, or dramas in various genres.

    Watching Thai movies and shows is a great way to practice your listening and become more familiar with Thai culture. It will also expose you to various Thai accents, and give you a better idea of how idioms and proverbs are used in different contexts.
  • Debate on various topics.

    Try debating with your Thai friends on various topics. This will help you practice explaining concepts, giving your opinions, influencing others, persuading your audience, and making compromises.
Let’s Debate on Which Is the Healthier Way to Cook: Boiling or Steaming?

How ThaiPod101 Can Help

  • Conversation Starters for Advanced Listeners

    Knowing how to start and hold conversations is a crucial skill for advanced-level learners. In our Conversation Starters for Advanced Learners series, you can listen to various Thai-related stories to improve your listening and speaking skills.
  • Must-Know Thai Slang Words & Phrases

    Knowing how to use slang, idioms, and proverbs is a major step forward. In our Must-Know Thai Slang Words & Phrases series, you’ll be able to learn phrases you wouldn’t find in a textbook—from sayings about personalities and electronics, to words you can use to sound cuter!
  • Advanced-Level YouTube Videos

    Finally, our YouTube channel has plenty of videos geared toward advanced-level learners. Pick up more complex phrases and sentences, dive deeper into various grammar concepts, discover more about Thai culture, and have fun the entire time!

Conclusion

By this point, we’re sure that you have a better idea of how long it takes to learn Thai. What are your thoughts on the topic? If you’ve already started learning Thai, please comment below to let your fellow language learners know how long it took you to get where you are!

Since you’re reading this article, you’re surely interested in the Thai language and/or culture. ThaiPod101.com has an array of fun but practical lessons and materials you’re sure to enjoy going through! Create your free lifetime account today to get the most out of your time studying with us, and see your progress soar.

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The Top 30 Thai Proverbs and Sayings

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Thai people have been using metaphors in day-to-day life for a very long time, so it’s not surprising that proverbs are so prominent in the Thai language today. As a learner of the language, you can greatly benefit from studying Thai proverbs. Doing so will not only help you sound more like a native speaker, but it will also give you more insight into Thai culture and the way Thai people think. 

In this lesson, we’ll go over the characteristics of Thai proverbs and present you with a list of the top thirty Thai proverbs and sayings you should learn. Each proverb on our list is accompanied by a detailed explanation and an example of how to use it properly. 

Enjoy!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. An Introduction to Thai Proverbs
  2. Good Doctrines
  3. Things You Should Do
  4. Things You Shouldn’t Do
  5. Conclusion

1. An Introduction to Thai Proverbs 

To begin, let’s break down the Thai word for “proverb”: สุภาษิต (sù-phaa-sìt).

  • สุ () – good
  • ภาษิต (phaa-sìt) – educational phrases that have been passed down from generation to generation

So literally, สุภาษิต (sù-phaa-sìt) refers to a good phrase that has been used to teach people for a long time.

A สุภาษิต (sù-phaa-sìt) is a metaphor that’s used to teach people so that they learn and become better. It’s often written in rhyme, making it easy to remember. 

In Thai, idioms and proverbs are very similar. Because they’re both metaphors, Thai people have a hard time differentiating between the two and often group them together as สำนวนสุภาษิตไทย (sǎm-nuuan-sù-phaa-sìt-thai). One trick you can use is to ask, “Can you use this phrase to teach people or not?” If you can, then it’s a สุภาษิต (sù-phaa-sìt), or Thai proverb. If you can’t, then it’s just a Thai idiom, or สำนวนไทย (sǎm-nuuan-thai).

In the following section, you’ll learn a variety of Thai proverbs and sayings. We’ve included the literal translation of each proverb, as well as a close English proverb and an explanation of how to use it. These proverbs are divided into three categories: 

  • Good Doctrines
  • Things You Should Do
  • Things You Shouldn’t Do 

Let’s get to it! 

2. Good Doctrines

Here are several Thai proverbs about life and how to live well. 

1 – คุณค่าของคนอยู่ที่ผลงาน

  • Pronunciation: khun-khâa-khǎawng-khon-yùu-thîi-phǒn-ngaan
  • Literal translation: The value of a man comes from his works.
  • Close English proverb: A man of word, not a man of deed, is like a garden full of weeds.

Explanation:
We determine the value of a person’s life based on their actions and the results of those actions. This expression is used to teach people to work diligently and not just lay around all the time. When you work, you get something from it; if you don’t work, it lessens the value of your life.

Example:
คุณค่าของคนอยู่ที่ผลงาน ถ้าไม่ตั้งใจทำงาน เอาแต่เที่ยวเล่น เธอก็จะกลายเป็นคนไม่มีค่า
khun-khâa-khǎawng-khon-yùu-thîi-phǒn-ngaan thâa-mâi-dtâng-jai-tham-ngaan ao-dtàae-thîiao-lên thooe-gâaw-jà-glaai-bpen-khon-mâi-mii-khâa
The value of a man comes from his/her actions. If you don’t pay attention to work, only to partying and drinking, you become worthless.

2 – สำเนียงส่อภาษา กริยาส่อสกุล

  • Pronunciation: sǎm-niiang-sàaw-phaa-sǎa-gì-rí-yaa-sàaw-sà-gun
  • Literal translation: The accent implies your language and the manner implies your clan.
  • Close English proverb: Good manners are part and parcel of a good education.

Explanation:
This Thai proverb means that the way you speak and act reflects how you were raised. It shows whether your parents took care of you and taught you properly. This proverb also reflects the importance of the family unit in Thai society.

Example:
ลูกควรจะพูดจาให้สุภาพตลอดเวลา เพราะ สำเนียงส่อภาษา กริยาส่อสกุล ถ้าพูดจาหยาบคาย คนอื่นจะหาว่า พ่อแม่ไม่สั่งสอนได้
lûuk-khuuan-jà-phûut-jaa-hâi-sù-phâap-dtà-làawt-wee-laa phráw sǎm-niiang-sàaw-phaa-sǎa-gì-rí- yaa-sàaw-sà-gun thâa-phûut-ja-yàap-khaai khon-ùuen-jà-hǎa-wâa-phâaw-mâae-mâi-sàng-šaawn dâai
[speaking to your child] You should speak politely all the time because the way you speak and act reflects how you are being raised. If you speak rudely, others will say that you are not being raised well by your parents.

3 – ไม่มีอะไรสายเกินแก้

  • Pronunciation: mai-mii-à-rai-sǎai-gooen-gâae
  • Literal translation: Nothing is too late to mend.
  • Close English proverb: It is never too late to mend.

Explanation: 
Everybody makes mistakes. This Thai proverb aims to encourage people to fix their mistakes.

Example:
ถึงเธอจะเคยทำตัวไม่ดี แต่เธอก็สามารถปรับปรุงตัวได้ ไม่มีอะไรสายเกินแก้
thǔeng-thooe-jà-khooei-tham-dtuua-mâi-dii dtàae-thooe-gâaw-sǎa-mâat-bpràp-bprung-dtuua-dâai mâi- mii-à-rai-sǎai-gooen-gâae
Despite being bad before, you can improve. Nothing is too late to mend.

4 – ความพยายามอยู่ที่ไหน ความสำเร็จอยู่ที่นั้น

  • Pronunciation: khwaam-phá-yaa-yaam-yùu-thîi-nǎi khwaam-sǎm-rèt-yùu-thîi-nân
  • Literal translation: Where there is an effort, there is a success.
  • Close English proverb: Where there is a will, there is a way.

Explanation:
This Thai proverb means that if you try hard, you’ll be successful. It aims to teach people not to give up easily as everything in life has its challenges.

Example:  
ถึงมันจะยาก แต่ฉันจะทำให้ได้ ความพยายามอยู่ที่ไหน ความสำเร็จอยู่ที่นั่น
thǔeng-man-jà-yâak dtàae-chǎn-jà-tham-hâi-dâai khwaam-phá-yaa-yaam-yùu-thîi-nǎi khwaam-sǎm- rèt-yùu-thîi-nân
Despite it being hard, I will do it. If I try hard, I will be able to do it.

5 – ทำดีได้ดี ทำชั่วได้ชั่ว

  • Pronunciation: tham-dii-dâai-dii tham-chûua-dâai-chûua
  • Literal translation: If you do good, good things come to you. If you do bad, bad things come to you.
  • Close English proverb: What goes around comes around.

Explanation:  
This saying, influenced by Buddhist doctrine, encourages people to always do good things.

Example:  
ถึงแม้จะไม่มีใครเห็น เธอก็ไม่ควรทำสิ่งที่ผิด เพราะ ทำดีได้ดี ทำชั่วได้ชั่ว
thǔeng-máae-jà-mâi-mii-khrai-hěn thooe-gâaw-mâi-khuuan-tham-sìng-thîi-phìt phráw tham-dii-dâai-dii tham-chûua-dâai-chûua
Even though no one will see, you shouldn’t do the wrong thing because if you do good, good things come to you and vice-versa.

6 – คบคนพาล พาลไปหาผิด คบบัณฑิต บัณฑิตพาไปหาผล

  • Pronunciation: khóp-khon-phaan phaan-bpai-hǎa-phìt khóp-ban-dìt ban-dìt-phaa-bpai-haa-phǒn
  • Literal translation: If you have bad friends, they lead you to bad. If you have graduated friends, they lead you to good.
  • Close English proverb: Tell me who your friends are, and I will tell you who you are.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that bad friends will influence you to do bad things, while good friends will influence you to do good things. It aims to teach people that friends or other people you spend time with influence you. If you want to be good and successful, spend time with good people.

Example:  
เวลาคบเพื่อน ให้เลือกคบเพื่อนที่ตั้งใจเรียนนะคะ คบคนพาล พาลไปหาผิด คบบัณฑิต บัณฑิตพาไปหาผล
wee-laa-khóp-phûuean hâi-lûueak-khóp-phûuean-thîi-dtâng-jai-riian-ná-khá khóp-khon-phaan phaan- bpai-hǎa-phìt khóp-ban-dìt ban-dìt-phaa-bpai-hǎa-phǒn
When making friends, choose people who pay attention in class. If you have good friends, they influence you to do good things and vice-versa.

3. Things You Should Do

Now that we’ve gone over a few general sayings about how to live life well, let’s look at some common Thai proverbs that talk about what you should do to be successful. 

7 – นกน้อยทำรังแต่พอตัว

  • Pronunciation: nók-náauy-tham-rang-dtàae-phaaw-dtuua
  • Literal translation: A small bird builds its nest big enough for itself.
  • Close English proverb: Cut your coat according to your clothes.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that you should only buy things you can afford.

Example:  
แม่ว่าหนูซื้อรถรุ่นนี้ก็พอ รุ่นนั้นแพงเกินไป นกน้อยทำรังแต่พอตัวนะจ๊ะ
mâae-wâa-nǔu-súue-rót-rûn-níi-gâaw-phaaw rûn-nán-phaaeng-gooen-bpai nók-náauy-tham-rang- dtàae-phaaw-dtuua ná-já
[mother talking to daughter] I think you should buy this model (car). That model is too expensive. You should buy things based on the amount of money you have.

8 – พูดไปสองไพเบี้ย นิ่งเสียตำลึงทอง

  • Pronunciation: phûut-bpai-sǎawng-phai-bîia nîng-sǐia-dtam-lueng-thaawng
  • Literal translation: Speaking lost two silvers, being silent got one gold.
  • Close English proverb: Silence is golden.

Explanation:  
Sometimes, staying silent is better or more appropriate than speaking out.

Example:  
เขากำลังโกรธ พูดไปก็สองไพเบี้ย นิ่งเสียตำลึงทอง รอเขาอารมณ์ดีก่อนดีกว่า
khǎo-gam-lang-gròot phûut-bpai-gâaw-sǎawng-phai-bîia nîng-sǐia-dtam-lueng-thaawng raaw-khǎo- aa-rom-dii-gàawn-dii-gwàa
He is angry now. It is not good to speak now, so you better stay silent and wait until he is in a good mood.

Silence Is Golden

9 – เข้าเมืองตาหลิ่ว ให้หลิ่วตาตาม

  • Pronunciation: khâo-muueang-dtaa-lìu hai-lìu-dtaa-dtaam
  • Literal translation: Go into the city where people look with one eye, and follow them by looking with one eye.
  • Close English proverb: When in Rome, do as the Romans do.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb encourages us to act as most people do in a given society. When you go to a new place, you should follow the customs and actions of the people there.

Example:  
เข้าเมืองตาหลิ่ว ให้หลิ่วตาตาม ตอนนี้มาอยู่ที่อเมริกาแล้ว จะกินข้าวทุกมื้อก็คงจะไม่สะดวก
khâo-muueang-dtaa-lìu hai-lìu-dtaa-dtaam dtaawn-níi-maa-yùu-thîi-a-mee-rí-gaa-láaeo jà-gin- khâao-thúk-múue-gâaw-khong-jà-mâi-sà-dùuak
You should act as most people do in society. Now that you are in America, eating rice with every meal would be inconvenient.

10 – กันไว้ดีกว่าแก้

  • Pronunciation: gan-wái-dii-gwàa-gâae
  • Literal translation: Prevent is better than repair. 
  • Close English proverb: Prevention is better than a cure.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that it’s better to prevent problems from happening than to solve them. It emphasizes the importance of prevention and preparation, as many problems won’t happen (or have a lesser chance of happening) if you take action in advance.

Example:  
ไปดูทีว่าปิดประตูบ้านดีหรือยัง กันไว้ดีกว่าแก้นะ
bpai-duu-thii-wâa-bpìt-bprà-dtuu-bâan-dii-rúue-yang gan-wái-dii-gwàa-gâae-ná
Go check whether the door is locked properly or not. It is better to prevent problems from happening.

11 – เข้าเถื่อนอย่าลืมพร้า

  • Pronunciation: khâo-thùuean-yàa-luuem-phráa
  • Literal translation: Don’t forget to bring a knife when you go to the jungle.

Explanation:  
This is just another way of saying, “Don’t be reckless.” You have to prepare yourself before doing things.

Example:  
พรุ่งนี้เธอจะเดินทางแล้ว เตรียมตัวหรือยัง เข้าเถื่อนอย่าลืมพร้านะ
phrûng-níi-thooe-jà-dooen-thaang-láaeo dtriiam-dtuua-rǔue-yang khâo-thùuean-yàa-luuem-phráa ná
Tomorrow, you will go traveling. Are you prepared? Don’t be reckless.

12 – คบคนให้ดูหน้า ซื้อผ้าให้ดูเนื้อ

  • Pronunciation: khóp-khon-hâi-duu-nâa súue-phâa-hâi-duu-núuea
  • Literal translation: Look at the face before making a friend with someone, like looking at the cloth itself before buying the clothes.

Explanation:  
There are good people and bad people in society. You should determine whether or not a person is good before becoming friends with them.

Example:  
คบคนให้ดูหน้า ซื้อผ้าให้ดูเนื้อ ฉันว่าคนนั้นพูดจาหยาบคาย เราอย่าไปยุ่งกับเขาเลย
khóp-khon-hâi-duu-nâa súue-phâa-hâi-duu-núuea chǎn-wâa-khon-nán-phûut-jaa-yàap-khaai rao- yàa-bpai-yûng-gàp-khǎo-looei
We have to think before making friends with someone. That person speaks rudely. We shouldn’t associate ourselves with him.

You Should Make Friends with Good People.

13 – ช้า ๆ ได้พร้าเล่มงาม

  • Pronunciation: cháa-cháa-dâai-phráa-lêm-ngaam
  • Literal translation: Slowly to get beautiful knife
  • Close English proverb: Haste makes waste.

Explanation:  
When you do things, you should take the time to do them carefully. The metaphor refers to how you can only make a good knife by taking your time.

Example:  
จะทำงานศิลปะต้องค่อย ๆ ทำถึงจะได้งานที่สวย ช้า ๆ ได้พร้าเล่มงาม
jà-tham-ngaan-sǐn-lá-bpà-dtâawng-khâauy-khâauy-tham-thǔeng-jà-dâai-ngaan-thîi-sǔuai cháa-cháa- dâai-phráa-lêm-ngaam
When you do artwork, you have to do it slowly to get beautiful work. When you do things, you shouldn’t rush; instead, take the time to do it carefully.

14 – น้ำขึ้นให้รีบตัก

  • Pronunciation: náam-khûuen-hâi-rîip-dtàk
  • Literal translation: Quickly fetch the water during the rising tide.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that you should take advantage of opportunities as they arise.

Example:  
ช่วงนี้ ฉันเปิดร้านเร็วกว่าปกติ 1 ชั่วโมง เพราะ คนมาเที่ยวเยอะ น้ำขึ้นต้องรีบตัก
chûuang-níi chǎn-bpòoet-ráan-reo-gwàa-bpòk-gà-dti-nùeng-chûua-moong phráw khon-maa-thîiao-yóe náam-khûen-hâi-rîip-dtàk
Recently, I opened my shop one hour earlier than usual because there are a lot of travelers. I have to take a chance when I have one.

15 – อยู่บ้านท่านอย่านิ่งดูดาย ปั้นวัวปั้นควายให้ลูกท่านเล่น

  • Pronunciation: yùu-bâan-thâan-yàa-nîng-duu-daai bpân-wuua-bpân-khwaai-hâi-lûuk-thâan-lên
  • Literal translation: Don’t do nothing in another’s home; make a cow doll for their child.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that if you live in another person’s house, you should help them. If someone lets you live with them for free, it’s good manners to help them out around the house.

Example:  
ไปพักอยู่บ้านคุณป้าก็ช่วยคุณป้าทำงานบ้านบ้างนะ อยู่บ้านท่านอย่านิ่งดูดาย ปั้นวัวปั้นควายให้ลูกท่านเล่น
bpai-phák-yùu-bâan-khun-bpâa-gâaw-chûuay-khun-bpâa-tham-ngaan-bâan-bâang-ná yùu-bâan- thâan-yàa-nîng-duu-daai bpân-wuua-bpân-khwaai-hâi-lûuk-thâan-lên
Once you live with your aunt, you should help do some of the housework. If you live in another person’s house, you should help them.

Help Your Aunt do Some Housework

16 – เอาใจเขามาใส่ใจเรา

  • Pronunciation: ao-jai-khǎo-maa-sài-jai-rao
  • Literal translation: Put his/her heart into our heart

Explanation:  
This saying means that you should think of others, and pay attention to how they think and feel.

Example:  
ถ้าจะอยู่ด้วยกัน ก็ต้องเอาใจเขามาใส่ใจเรา
thâa-jà-yùu-dûuai-gan gâaw-dtâawng-ao-jai-khǎo-maa-sài-jai-rao
If you want to live together, you have to think of one another.

4. Things You Shouldn’t Do

To conclude our list of popular Thai proverbs, let’s look at some words of wisdom on how not to act. 

17 – หมากัดอย่ากัดตอบ

  • Pronunciation: mǎa-gàt-yàa-gàt-dtàawp 
  • Literal translation: Dog bites, don’t bite back.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that you shouldn’t lower yourself to a bad person’s level in order to fight back. Thai people view those who do bad things or act inappropriately as lower-class people. By doing the same action those people do, you lower yourself. So even when you’re angry at how someone hurt you, you should avoid hurting them back.

Example:  
ถึงเขาจะพูดจาหยาบคายใส่เรา แต่เราต้องไม่พูดจาหยาบคายกลับไป หมากัดอย่ากัดตอบ
thǔeng-khǎo-jà-phûut-jaa-yàap-khaai-sài-rao dtàae-rao-dtâawng-mâi-phûut-jaa-yàap-khaai-glàp-bpai mǎa-gàt-yàa-gàt-dtàawp
Although he talked to us rudely, we must not speak rudely back. Don’t do bad things in order to fight back against bad people.

18 – กินบนเรือนขี้บนหลังคา

  • Pronunciation: gin-bon-ruuean-khîi-bon-lǎng-khaa
  • Literal translation: Eat in the house and then poop on the roof.
  • Close English proverb: Don’t bite the hand that feeds you.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb refers to a situation where someone is being unthankful and doing harm to people who are good to them and have helped them before. It encourages us to be thankful to parents, teachers, and our benefactors.

Example:  
คนที่กินบนเรือนขี้ยนหลังคาเป็นคนที่คบไม่ได้
khon-thîi-gin-bon-ruuean-khîi-bon-lǎng-khaa-bpen-khon-thîi-khóp-mâi-dâai
People who are unthankful and doing harm to people who are good to them shouldn’t be associated with.

19 – สาวไส้ให้กากิน

  • Pronunciation: sǎao-sâi-hâi-gaa-gin
  • Literal translation: Pull the intestine out for the crow to eat.
  • Close English proverb: Don’t wash dirty linen in public

Explanation:  
This saying refers to a situation where someone reveals a bad secret concerning family or friends to others. You shouldn’t tell secrets (bad things) about people who are close to you.

Example:  
เรื่องทะเลาะกันของพี่น้อง อย่าเล่าให้คนอื่นฟัง จะเป็นการสาวไส้ให้กากิน
rûueang-thá-láw-gan-khǎawng-phîi-náawng yàa-lâo-hâi-khon-ùuen-fang jà-bpen-gaan-sǎao-sâi-hâi- gaa-gin
You shouldn’t tell others about a fight between siblings. It’s like revealing bad things about your family to others.

20 – หาเหาใส่หัว / แกว่งเท้าหาเสี้ยน

  • Pronunciation: hǎa-hǎo-sài-hǔa / gwàaeng-tháo-hǎa-sîian
  • Literal translation: Find the louse and put it on the head. / Sway your feet for the bur.
  • Close English proverb: Let a sleeping dog lie.

Explanation:  
Both of these Thai proverbs encourage us not to interfere in a situation that’s already good enough, because it can lead to more problems.

Example 1:  
รู้ก็รู้ว่าเพื่อนทำผิด ยังจะไปช่วยอีก หาเหาใส่หัวชัด ๆ
rúu-gâaw-rúu-wâa-phûuean-tham-phìt yang-jà-bpai-chûuay-ìik hǎa-hǎo-sài-hǔua-chát-chát
You know that your friend did a bad thing but you still helped him. You just found yourself a problem.

Example 2:  
อย่าแกว่งเท้าหาเสี้ยนเลย แม่ขอร้อง
yàa-gwàaeng-tháo-hǎa-sîian-looei mâae-khǎaw-ráawng
[mother speaking to her children] I beg you, don’t do things that will bring problems.

21 – วัวหายล้อมคอก

  • Pronunciation: wuua-hǎai-láawm-khâawk
  • Literal translation: Making a stall after the cow is lost
  • Close English proverb: Locking the stable door after the horse is stolen

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb means that you shouldn’t wait to take action until after the problem arises, because it’s then useless. You should rather prevent the problem from happening in the first place. There’s no point in taking preventative measures afterward, because you can’t bring back what you already lost.

Example:  
ผมว่าหน้าต่างบ้านคุณดูไม่แข็งแรงเลย น่าจะเปลี่ยนใหม่นะ อย่ารอจนวัวหายแล้วค่อยล้อมคอก
phǒm-wâa-nâa-dtâang-bâan-khun-duu-mâi-khǎaeng-raaeng-looei nâa-jàa-bplìian-mài-ná yàa- raaw-jon-wuua-hǎai-láaeo-khâauy-láawm-khâawk
I don’t think your window is in good condition. You better change it. Don’t wait until the damage is already done to take some action.

22 – จับปลาสองมือ

  • Pronunciation: jàp-bplaa-sǎawng-muue
  • Literal translation: Catch fish with one hand at the same time
  • Close English proverb: He who hunts two hares, leaves one and loses another.

Explanation:  
Doing two difficult things at the same time will lead to failure in both. Imagine how hard it would be to catch a fish in each hand at the same time! Instead, we should focus on doing one thing at a time.

Example:  
จะทำอะไรก็เลือกเอาสักอย่าง อย่าจับปลาสองมือ
jà-tham-à-rai-gâaw-lûueak-ao-sák-yàang yàa-jàp-bplaa-sǎawng-muue
Choose one thing that you want to do. Don’t try to do two difficult things at the same time.

23 – ตีตนไปก่อนไข้

  • Pronunciation: dtii-dton-bpai-gàawn-khâi
  • Literal translation: Think that you have a fever before you actually have a fever
  • Close English proverb: Don’t cross the bridge until you come to it.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb refers to a situation where someone is fearful or worried about something that hasn’t happened yet. It encourages us not to worry too much about problems that haven’t happened yet. In the end, that problem may not happen at all!

Example:  
ยังไม่เกิดปัญหาอะไร อย่าเพิ่งตีต้นไปก่อนไข้ จะปวดหัวเปล่า ๆ
yang-mâi-gôoet-bpan-hǎa-à-rai yàa-phôoeng-dtii-dton-bpai-gàawn-khâi jà-bpùuat-hǔua-bplào-bplào
There’s no problem yet. Don’t worry about things that haven’t happened yet. You’ll have a headache for nothing.

24 – กำแพงมีหู ประตูมีช่อง

  • Pronunciation: gam-phaaeng-mii-hǔu bprà-dtuu-mii-châawng
  • Literal translation: Walls have ears. Doors have holes.
  • Close English proverb: The walls have ears.

Explanation:  
When talking about a secret, you have to be very careful because people may overhear and reveal it to others. Even if you’re in a room with the door closed, there may be people outside trying to eavesdrop.

Example:  
จะพูดอะไรให้ระวังหน่อย กำแพงมีหู ประตูมีช่อง
jà-phûut-à-rai-hâi-rá-wang-nàauy gam-phaaeng-mii-hǔu bprà-dtuu-mii-châawng
Be careful when speaking. People may hear your secret and reveal it to others.

Be Careful When Speaking; Walls Have Ears

25 – เอาไม้ซีกไปงัดไม้ซุง

Pronunciation: ao-máai-sîik-bpai-ngát-máai-sung

Literal translation: Use a thin stick of wood to wedge a log

Explanation:  
If you fight or disagree with people who have more power, there’s a good chance you’re going to lose. This proverb encourages us to choose our fights carefully.

Example:  
ตัวเล็กแค่นี้ ยังไปท้าต่อยตีกับเค้า เอาไม้ซีกไปงัดไม้ซุงแท้ ๆ
dtuua-lék-khâae-níi yang-bpai-tháa-dtàauy-dtii-gàp-kháo ao-máai-sîik-bpai-ngát-máai-sung-tháae-tháae
You’re this small but still pick a fight with others. You’re going to lose as you fight with bigger people.

Don’t Fight People Who Are Bigger Than You

26 – กวนน้ำให้ขุ่น

  • Pronunciation: guuan-nám-hâi-khùn
  • Literal translation: Stir the water, making it muddy

Explanation:  
This proverb refers to a situation where things are about to become good again, but someone ruins it. It’s often used when someone is about to forget about a bad thing that happened, but someone does something to remind them of it again.

Example:  
พ่อกำลังจะลืมอยู่แล้ว จะพูดขึ้นมาเพื่อกวนน้ำให้ขุ่นทำไม เดี๋ยวพ่อก็โกรธอีก
phâaw-gam-lang-jà-luuem-yùu-láaeo jà-phûut-khûen-maa-phûuea-guuan-nám-hâi-khùn-ìik-tham-mai dîiao-phâaw-gâaw-gròot-ìik
Dad is about to forget. Why do you speak about it to make him remember? He will get angry again.

27 – กบเลือกนาย

  • Pronunciation: gòp-lûueak-naai
  • Literal translation: Frog chooses boss.

Explanation:
If you’re too choosy, you may end up making a bad decision in the end. This proverb aims to teach people that it’s good to consider your options, but you shouldn’t overdo it.

Example:  
อย่าทำตัวเป็นกบเลือกนายหน่อยเลย เลือกเอาจากตัวเลือกที่มีก็พอ
yàa-tham-dtuua-bpen-gòp-lûueak-naai-nàauy-looei lûueak-ao-jàak-dtuua-lûueak-thîi-mii-gâaw- phaaw
Don’t be too choosy or else you may end up with the bad choice in the end. Just choose from the options you have.

28 – ขี่ช้างจับตั๊กแตน 

Pronunciation: khìi-cháang-jàp-dták-gà-dtaaen

Literal translation: Ride the elephant to catch the grasshoppers

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb refers to a situation where you invest a lot but only get a small return. It warns us to be careful with our investments so that we don’t end up losing out in the end.

Example:  
คิดยังไงถึงจะลงทุนซื้อรถคันใหม่เพื่อไปส่งของแค่ไม่กี่ครั้ง ขี่ช้างจับตั๊กแตนชัด ๆ
Khít-yang-ngai-thǔeng-jà-long-thun-súue-rót-khan-mài-phûuea-bpai-sòng-khǎawng-khâae-mâi-gìi- khráng khìi-cháang-jàp-dták-gà-dtaaen-chát-chát
What are you thinking? Buying a new car to deliver packages for a few times. You’re investing a lot for a small return.

29 – ชี้โพรงให้กระรอก

  • Pronunciation: chíi-phroong-hâi-grà-râawk
  • Literal translation: Point cavity for squirrel

Explanation:  
This proverb encourages us to be careful about the things we say, because we may unintentionally invite others to do something bad. For example, someone may say that the window of her house is broken and she is afraid a thief may come in that way. People who are in need of money may overhear what she said and decide to break into her house to steal.

Example:  
จะพูดอะไรต้องระวัง เดี๋ยวจะเป็นการชี้โพรงให้กระรอกเสียเปล่า ๆ
jà-phûut-à-rai-dtâawng-rá-wang dǐiao-jà-bpen-gaan-chíi-phroong-hâi-grà-râawk-sǐia-bplào-bplào
You have to be careful when speaking or else you may unintentionally advise someone to do bad things.

30 – อย่าไว้ใจทาง อย่าวางใจคน จะจนใจเอง

  • Pronunciation: yàa-wái-jai-thaang yàa-waang-jai-khon jà-jon-jai-eeng
  • Literal translation: Don’t trust the way, and don’t trust people or else you will be in trouble.

Explanation:  
This Thai proverb warns us against trusting people too easily, because doing so can cause us trouble in the long run.

Example:  
ถึงแม้ว่าเพื่อนของเธอจะแนะนำ แต่เธอก็ต้องดูรายละเอียดของบริการเองด้วย อย่าไว้ใจทาง อย่าวางใจคน จะจนใจเองนะ
thǔeng-máae-wâa-phûuean-khǎawng-thooe-jà-náe-nam dtàae-thooe-gâaw-dtâawng-duu-raai-lá-ìiat- khǎawng-baaw-rí-gaan-eeng-dûuai yàa-wái-jai-thaang yàa-waang-jai-khon jà-jon-jai-eeng
Even though it was recommended by your friend, you still have to look at the service details. Don’t trust people easily.

5. Conclusion

In this article, you learned thirty of the most common Thai proverbs, what they mean, and how to use them. How many of them can you relate to? And are there similar proverbs in your language? 

If you enjoyed this lesson, we recommend continuing to explore ThaiPod101.com. We provide tons of fun and informative lessons from native speakers, free vocabulary lists, an online dictionary, and much more. Here’s just a sample of what you can expect: 

Happy learning!

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Bangkok Travel Guide – The Best Places to Visit

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Travel is one of the reasons many people decide to learn a new language. There’s something magical about visiting a foreign country and being able to speak with locals in their native tongue. 

Thailand—often labeled the Land of Smiles—is a wonderful travel destination, whether you’re learning the language or not. Bangkok, in particular, is known for its beauty and strong tourist appeal. 

In this Bangkok travel guide from ThaiPod101.com, we’ll provide you with a list of the most famous places to visit in Bangkok. We’ll also give you some tips on how to make the most of your trip and go over some basic travel vocabulary you should know. 

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Facts About Bangkok, Thailand
  2. Where to Visit for a 1-3 Day Trip
  3. Highly Recommended Places for a 4-7 Day Trip (or Longer)
  4. Thai Survival Phrases for Travelers
  5. Conclusion

1. Facts About Bangkok, Thailand

Let’s start with some interesting information about Bangkok so that you know what to expect and how to prepare yourself for the trip.

Name

Did you know that Bangkok, in the native language, is the longest city name in the world

Most Thai people call the city กรุงเทพมหานคร (grung-thêep-má-hǎa-ná-khaawn) or simply กรุงเทพ (grung-thêep) for short. But the city’s full name is much longer:

กรุงเทพมหานคร อมรรัตนโกสินทร์ มหินทรายุธยา มหาดิลกภพ นพรัตนราชธานีบูรีรมย์ อุดมราชนิเวศน์มหาสถาน อมรพิมานอวตารสถิต สักกะทัตติย วิษณุกรรมประสิทธิ์ (grung-thêep-má-hǎa-ná-khaawn à-maawn-rát-dtà-ná-goo-sǐn má-hǐn-thá-raa-à-yút-thá-yaa má-hǎa-dì-lòk-phóp nóp-phá-rát-râat-chá-thaa-nii-buu-rii-rom ù-dom-râat-chá-ní-wêet-má-hǎa-sà-thǎan à-maawn-phí-maan-à-wá-dtaan-sà-thìt sàk-gà-thát-dtì-yá wít-sà-nú-gam-bprà-sìt)

It’s such a long name that Thai children sing it in a song when doing hand play.

General Information

Bangkok has been the capital city of Thailand since 1782. It’s home to around six million people, which makes it the largest city in the country

The currency of Thailand is Baht. Compared to other countries, the cost of living here isn’t very expensive.  The average cost of a normal meal is 50 Baht (1.61 USD) and the cost of a hotel starts at around 700 Baht (22.5 USD).

If you decide to come to Bangkok, do not worry about the language barrier. Not all Thai people can speak English, but they’re still willing to help you should you need it. That said, knowing a little bit of Thai can go a long way; for an even better travel experience, make sure to study our list of travel phrases at the end of the article. 

Weather

Since Thailand is located near the equator, the weather is hot and humid all year long, except during the rainy season from mid-May to mid-October. The temperature is normally around 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit).   

So, what is the best season to visit Bangkok? It all depends on what you want to see and do while you’re there! 

The best time to visit Bangkok for shopping is from November to January. The weather during this time frame isn’t very hot, the department stores have all been decorated for Christmas, and there are a lot of promotions going on. But if you want to join the Songkran Festival, April would be the best time to travel to Bangkok.

Travel Tips

Let’s start with the most important question: Is a visa required to visit Bangkok? 

For a concrete answer, you’ll need to check with the Thai embassy in your country. You may need a visa to visit Bangkok depending on your nationality. 

Because the currency in Thailand is Baht, you’ll need to prepare some cash before your trip. However, most hotels and department stores also accept credit or debit cards

In addition to your normal belongings, you may need to bring an umbrella as well as a hat or cap as the weather is hot and sunny. Other than that, if you forget anything, you can buy it in Bangkok.

2. Where to Visit for a 1-3 Day Trip 

If you plan to visit Bangkok in three days or less, there are a few locations you may want to prioritize. Following is a list of our recommendations, based on category; skim through and pick the ones that best match your tastes! 

Temples

The Thai word for “temple” is วัด (wát). 

If you come to Thailand, visiting temples is a must. Apart from their religious associations, temples reflect the architecture and culture of Thailand. Here are three temples in Bangkok we think you’ll love to see! Because they’re all nearby each other, you can visit all three on the same day. 

วัดพระศรีรัตนศาสดาราม (วัดพระแก้ว) / พระบรมมหาราชวัง

English name:
The Temple of the Emerald Buddha / The Grand Palace

Thai name:
wát-phrá-srǐi-rát-dtà-ná-sàat-sà-daa-raam  (wát-phrá-gâaeo) / phrá-bà-rom-má-hǎa-râat-chá-wang

Highlight:
The Temple of the Emerald Buddha is called “The Grand Palace” because in the past, kings lived inside of it. Due to its royal past, it boasts some beautiful architecture. Also, as its name suggests, another highlight is the Emerald Buddha. 

Things to do:
There’s a lot you can do here: pay respects to the Emerald Buddha, look at the wall painting of Ramayana, view the “Dusit Maha Prasat Throne Hall,” and visit “Queen Sirikit Museum of Textiles.”

What it’s most recommended for:

วัดพระเชตุพนวิมลมังคลารามราชวรมหาวิหาร (วัดโพธิ์)

English name:
Wat Pho

Thai name:
wát-phrá-chee-dtù-phon-wí-mon-mang-khá-laa-raam-râat-chá-wo-rá-má-hǎa-wí-hǎan (wát-phoo)

Highlight:
This temple is viewed as being the first university in Thailand because the names of various educational subjects are inscribed here. It’s also “The Memory of the World Programme of UNESCO.”

Things to do:
There are plenty of unique experiences to be had here. You can pay respects to the reclining Buddha, look at the beauty of various pagodas, and listen to the story of the Wat Pho giants. After you’ve gotten your fill of Thai culture and history, you can also get a Thai massage here.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Learning about Thai culture
  • Viewing architecture
  • Sightseeing 

วัดอรุณราชวรารามราชวรมหาวิหาร (วัดอรุณ / วัดแจ้ง)

English name:
Temple of Dawn

Thai name:
wát-à-run-râat-chá-wá-raa-raam-râat-chá-waaw-rá-má-hǎa-wí-hǎan (wát-à-run / wát-jâaeng)

Highlight:
The Temple of Dawn is known for its incredible beauty and architecture, making it the perfect spot for sightseeing and photo-ops. 

Things to do:
Stupa of Wat Arun is one of the most popular Bangkok sightseeing places, offering a spectacular view of the sunrise and sunset at the riverside. And of course, to complete the story of the Wat Pho giants, you have to listen to the story of the Wat Jaaeng giants as well.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Learning about Thai culture
  • Viewing architecture
  • Sightseeing
  • Taking pictures

Let’s Take Photos at the Temple of Dawn

Shows

There are a lot of interesting shows you can watch in Bangkok that reflect Thai culture, so you’re sure to find one you like! 

สยามนิรมิต

English name:
Siam Niramit Show

Thai name:
sà-yǎam-ní-rá-mít

Highlight of the show:
This is the show to see for an enthralling story of Thailand’s history and culture. It takes place on a gigantic stage and employs amazing special effects—there are even live elephants involved! This show has been the recipient of several prestigious awards, so you shouldn’t miss it.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Learning about Thai culture
  • Good for kids
  • Good for a rainy day
  • Easy access for seniors and people with disabilities

มวยไทย

English name:
Thai boxing show

Thai name:
muuai-thai

Highlight of the show:
Thai boxing is a favorite sport of many people, both inside and outside of Thailand. If you enjoy sports or the martial arts, your visit to Bangkok should absolutely include a live Thai boxing match! 

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Good for a rainy day
  • Sports

คาลิปโซ่ คาบาเร่ต์

English name:
The Calypso Cabaret Show

Thai name:
khaa-líp-sôo khaa-baa-rêe

Highlight of the show:
The Calypso Cabaret Show provides a truly unique Broadway-style show. The cast is composed of transgender individuals who perform an array of shows, from dance numbers to dramas. The stage, music, and lighting are all phenomenal, and the shows are designed to cater to a wide variety of audiences and nationalities. 

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Good for a rainy day
  • Broadway-style show

The Cabaret Show Is So Fun!

Nature

Being in the city for a while might make you crave some time in nature. Despite being a big, crowded city, Bangkok does have several outdoor activities for tourists! These activities are budget-friendly, great for kids, and the perfect way to spend some quality outdoor time

สวนลุมพินี

English name:
Lumpini Park

Thai name:
sǔuan-lum-phí-nii

Highlight:
Lumpini Park is the first public park in Thailand and is over 142 acres in size. It’s located in the center of the city, and because it’s so big, entering the park is like going into another world. The weather in the morning and evening is very nice, so if you want to get some exercise during your trip, you should definitely add this park to your itinerary! The park is known to host a variety of meditation and aerobics classes (free of charge!), and you can also rent paddle boats anytime or enjoy listening to live jazz music on a Sunday.  

Things to do:
  • Exercise
  • Meditate
  • Jog
  • Ride a bicycle
  • Walk
  • Sightsee
  • Take pictures
  • Listen to live music
  • Rent paddle boats

สวนวชิรเบญจทัศ (สวนรถไฟ)

English name:
Rotfai Park

Thai name:
sǔuan-wá-chí-rá-ben-jà-thát (sǔuan-rót-fai)

Highlight:
This is another park in Bangkok you can visit. Its location may not be as convenient as Lumpini Park’s, but the atmosphere is quite pleasant. It’s slightly bigger than Lumpini Park, at over 148 acres. In addition to renting paddle boats for the lake or bicycles for the trails, you can pass some time in the park’s butterfly garden or admire the cute miniature version of Bangkok that features small replicas of popular buildings. 

Things to do:
  • Exercise
  • Jog
  • Ride a bicycle
  • Walk
  • Sightsee
  • Take pictures
  • Rent paddle boats
  • See butterflies
  • View the miniature Bangkok setup

บางกะเจ้า

English name:
Bangkachao

Thai name:
baang-gà-jâo

Highlight:
Bangkachao is called “the green lung” of Bangkok, and Time magazine even referred to it as “the best urban oasis” in Asia. You can come here to relax in a natural atmosphere, far from the worries of life and the bustling areas of the city. 

Things to do:
  • Ride a bicycle
  • Walk
  • Sightsee
  • Take pictures
  • Shop
  • Relax

Shopping

Now, for the favorite activity of many people: shopping! Going shopping in the local markets and seeing the different products and foods here is an easy, exciting way to really feel the Thai culture. Here are the best places to lighten your wallet in Bangkok. 

ถนนข้าวสาร

English name:
Khaosan Road

Thai name:
thà-nǒn-khâao-sǎan

Highlight:
ถนนข้าวสาร (thà-nǒn-khâao-sǎan) is one of the top places in Bangkok to get your shop on! There are numerous things you can buy here, including plenty of clothing items that reflect Thai culture. You can also find many restaurants and guesthouses here, in addition to budget-friendly hotels for solo travelers. And if you come here for the Songkran Festival, you can participate in water games with the locals! 

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Budget-friendly
  • Shopping place
  • Street food

ตลาดนัดจตุจักร

English name:
Chatuchak Weekend Market

Thai name:
dthà-làat-nát-jà-dtù-jàk

Highlight:
Chatujak Weekend Market is famous for being the biggest shopping market in Bangkok—and the most-visited weekend market worldwide. First opened in 1942, this is a market of massive scale featuring twenty-seven individual sections and numerous stalls. You can find an array of products and food items here, from clothing to plants and even vintage products. 

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Shopping place
  • Unique shopping experience

เยาวราช

English name:
Chinatown

Thai name:
yao-wá-râat

Highlight:
เยาวราช (yao-wá-râat), or Yaowarat Road, is where much of Bangkok’s Chinatown is located. You can enjoy a good day of shopping here and indulge in some of the area’s notorious street food. If you come here during the Vegetarian Festival (October), there will be a lot of delicious vegetarian foods for you to try. You’ll also get to experience a small bit of Thai-Chinese culture.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Shopping place
  • Street food

Let’s Eat Something at Chinatown.

3. Highly Recommended Places for a 4-7 Day Trip (or Longer)

If you have a longer stay planned, there are more interesting places you can visit in Bangkok. Here are our recommendations.

Museums

If you want to learn more about Thai culture, history, or art, there are a few museums in Bangkok you shouldn’t miss. 

พิพิธภัณฑ์บ้านจิมทอมป์สัน

English name:
Jim Thompson House Museum

Thai name:
phí-phít-thá-phan-bâan-jim-thaawm-sǎn

Highlight:
You may be wondering about the name of this museum: Jim Thompson was an American businessman who founded a silk company in Thailand. He was known for his love of art collection, and over the years, he added to his collection of Southeast Asian art—especially that of Thailand. Thompson disappeared in 1967, after which his collection became open for public viewing via this museum. Here, you’ll find Thai-style houses and pottery in a natural and relaxing atmosphere at the center of Bangkok.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Culture
  • Architecture
  • Restaurant

ท้องฟ้าจำลอง

English name:
Planetarium

Thai name:
tháawng-fáa-jam-laawng

Highlight:
If you love astronomy or stargazing, you need to make room for this on your itinerary at all costs. It’s a nice place to visit and children will definitely love it.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Budget-friendly
  • Good for kids
  • Good for a rainy day
  • Honeymoon spot

Can We Stargaze During the Day?

พิพิธภัณฑ์สถานแห่งชาติ

English name:
National Museum

Thai name:
phí-phít-thá-phan-sà-thǎan-hàaeng-châat

Highlight:
If you want to know more about Thai history and Thai-style arts, this Bangkok art and culture museum is the perfect place. Because it used to be a palace, you’ll also be able to see beautiful architecture during your visit.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Culture
  • Sightseeing
  • Thai arts

Animals

If you’re an animal-lover, there are plenty of exciting attractions in Bangkok you’ll have a blast visiting. 

ซีไลฟ์ แบงคอก โอเชี่ยน เวิลด์

English name:
Sealife Bangkok Ocean World

Thai name:
sii-lái-báaeng-khâawk-oo-chîian-wooen

Highlight:
Home to a large variety of sea life, Sealife Bangkok Ocean World boasts an aquarium of 10,000+ square meters. While here, you can get close to the sea stars and sea cucumbers, watch divers submerge themselves in a seven-meter tank to feed the sea life, and admire tropical freshwater species from around the world.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Good for kids
  • Good for a rainy day
  • Easy access for seniors and people with disabilities

สถานเสาวภา สภากาชาดไทย (สวนงู)

English name:
Snake Farm

Thai name:
sà-thǎan-sǎo-wá-phaa sà-phaa-gaa-châat-thai (sǔuan-nguu)

Highlight:
This is an educational organization about snakes, located at the center of the city. During your visit here, you’ll be able to watch how venom is extracted from snakes, see snake handling up close, and take pictures with the snakes. It’s a great opportunity to learn more about snakes, including information about snake biology and snake bite treatment.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Snake-lovers
  • Budget-friendly

อุทยานผีเสื้อและแมลงกรุงเทพ

English name:
Bangkok Butterfly Garden and Insectarium

Thai name:
ùt-thá-yaan-phǐi-sûuea-láe-má-laaeng-grung-thêep

Highlight:
At the Bangkok Butterfly Garden and Insectarium, you can learn about and watch over 500 butterflies of twenty different species in a large dome. There’s also a video to watch about insects and ecology, and you can see an exhibition about the larvae of butterflies and insects.

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Butterfly-lovers
  • Budget-friendly
  • Good for kids

I Want to Know How Larvae become Butterflies.

Nightlife

Wondering where to visit in Bangkok at night? Here are two locations you should definitely check out for an exhilarating night out (keep in mind that these are not family-friendly). 

ซอยคาวบอย

English name:
Soi Cowboy

Thai name:
saauy-khaao-baauy

Highlight:
Located in the Asoke area, Soi Cowboy is a popular nightlife destination for tourists. The place is named after an American named T.G. “Cowboy” Edwards, who opened the second bar in the area. Today, the area is mostly known for its string of go-go bars and pubs. 

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Adult-only
  • Drinking
  • Sexy show

ถนนพัฒน์พงศ์

English name:
Patpong Road

Thai name:
thà-nǒn-phát-phong

Highlight:
Patpong Road is located in the Silom area and is a “designated entertainment zone” as well as a red light district. Like Soi Cowboy, Patpong Road is popular for its go-go bars and pubs. 

What it’s most recommended for:
  • Adult only
  • Drinking
  • Sexy show

Department Stores

If you didn’t get enough shopping in earlier, now’s the time to get your fill! Here are two department stores in Bangkok we highly recommend. 

ไอคอน สยาม

English name:
Icon Siam

Thai name:
ai-khâawn-sà-yǎam

Highlight:
This is a department store near the riverside, and it’s composed of several areas, such as:

    ★ Siam Takashiyama (Japanese department store)
    ★ Sook Siam (Thai culture representation and products)
    ★ Dear Tummy (Premium supermarket)
    ★ Superpark (Theme park)

There are often beautiful shows here during festivals and holidays, such as on Christmas and New Year’s Day.

Things to do:
  • Shopping
  • Eating
  • Watching shows
  • Souvenir shopping


What it’s most recommended for:
  • Shopping
  • Restaurants
  • Good for a rainy day
  • Cinema

สยาม พารากอน

English name:
Siam Paragon

Thai name:
sà-yǎam-phaa-raa-gaawn

Highlight:
One of the top three biggest department stores in Thailand, this place is heaven for people who love shopping.  You can find everything here: all kinds of restaurants, a big supermarket, clothing shops, bag shops, watch shops, and the list goes on.

Things to do:
  • Shopping
  • Eating
  • Watching sea life at “Sealife Bangkok Ocean World”
  • Souvenir shopping


What it’s most recommended for:
  • Shopping
  • Restaurants
  • Good for a rainy day
  • Cinema

4. Thai Survival Phrases for Travelers

How Much Is It?

If you’re going to travel to Thailand, learning some basic phrases may prove very helpful in a variety of situations. To give you a nice head start, we’ll provide you with ten Thai survival phrases for travelers. Keep in mind that when Thai people greet each other, they do an action called ไหว้ (wâi)

  • สวัสดี (sà-wàt-dii) – “Hello.” / “Goodbye.”
  • ขอบคุณ (khàawp-khun) – “Thank you.”
  • ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) – “Sorry.”
  • ดีมาก (dii-mâak) – “Very good.”
  • ไม่เข้าใจภาษาไทย (mâi-khâo-jai-phaa-sǎa-thai) – “I don’t understand Thai.”
  • ห้องน้ำอยู่ที่ไหน (hâawng-nám-yùu-thîi-nǎi) – “Where is the restroom?”
  • ราคาเท่าไหร่ (raa-khaa-thâo-rài) – “How much is it?”
  • ลดราคาหน่อยได้มั๊ย (lót-raa-khaa-nàauy-dâi-mái) – “Can I reduce the price?”
  • เอาอันนี้ (ao-an-níi) – “I want this.”
  • ช่วยด้วย (chûuay-dûuay) – “Help!”

Conclusion

If you were on the fence before, we hope this article has given you plenty of good reasons to visit Bangkok in the near future. And if you’ve been to Bangkok already, we would love to hear about your visit! Are there any impressive locations we didn’t include?  

We encourage you to learn a few additional Thai words or phrases to supplement the ones we listed above—this will make your trip much smoother and a lot more fun! ThaiPod101.com has plenty of useful language and culture resources to help you make the most of your time in Bangkok. After reading this article, you may want to check out these pages:

We’re wishing you happy Thai learning and safe travels!

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Common English Words in Thai: Do You Know Tinglish?

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Because English is a global language, it’s only natural that it would influence and be used in other languages, including Thai. If you know anything about Thai culture or have lived in Thailand for any amount of time, you’ll know that Thai people are very open-minded concerning outside influences. For this reason, there are many English loanwords in the Thai language. 

However, this influence has not been heavily reciprocated, and you’ll be hard-pressed to find any Thai words used in English. 

In this article, we’ll introduce you to Tinglish (Thai+English), English loanwords in Thai, and more!

A Woman Reading a Book on the Bus

Let’s learn Tinglish and English loanwords!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Introduction to Tinglish
  2. English Loanwords Used in Thai
  3. How to Say These Names in Thai
  4. Conclusion

1. Introduction to Tinglish

As mentioned earlier, Thai people are pretty open-minded. They have been greatly influenced by foreigners in terms of food, clothing, and language. There is no clear evidence indicating how Tinglish became so popular, but a possible explanation is that some Thai people heard these English words used in a specific context and misunderstood the actual meanings. As a result, they began using these words incorrectly.

Although the pronunciation of Tinglish words is the same as (or very similar to) that of the original English words, you have to know their Thai meaning in order to communicate effectively with Thai people. 

To help you start strong, we’ve compiled several examples of Tinglish, or common English words used in Thai with different meanings. 

1 – Fit 

Thai word: ฟิต (fít)

English meaning: the perfect size

Thai meaning: too tight or too small 

Example:  
ชั้นใส่กระโปรงตัวนี้ไม่ได้แล้ว มันฟิตเกินไป ต้องลดความอ้วนแล้วหละ
chǎn-sài-grà-bproong-dtuua-níi-mài-dâi-láaeo man-fít-gooen-bpai dtôong-lót-khwaam-aûuan-láaeo-là
I can no longer wear this skirt. It is too tight. I have to go on a diet now.

2 – Check bill 

Thai word: เช็คบิล (chék-bin)

English meaning: In English, people use either “check” or “bill.”

Thai meaning: Thai people use both words together as เช็คบิล (chék-bin).

Example:  
เช็คบิลเลยค่ะ และอาหารที่เหลือนี่ห่อกลับบ้านนะคะ
chék-bin-looei-khà láe-aa-hǎan-thîi-lǔuea-nîi-hàaw-glàp-bâan-ná-khá
Bill, please. And pack this leftover food to take home.

A Man Asking for the Check at a Restaurant

Should I say “check bill” or “bill”?

3 – Intrend

Thai word: อินเทรนด์ (in-treen)

English meaning: There is no English meaning for this word, but it comes from the word “trend.”

Thai meaning: trendy

Example:  
ตอนนี้สีเขียวกำลังอินเทรนด์เลย
dtaawn-níi-sǐi-khǐiao-gam-lang-in-threen-looei
“Green” is very trendy now.

4 – Chill 

Thai word: ชิล (chin)

English meaning: cold

Thai meaning: chill out

Example:  
บรรยากาศดีมาก น่ามานั่งชิล
ban-yaa-gàat-dii-mâak nâa-maa-nâng-chin
The atmosphere is very good for chilling out.

5 – In 

Thai word: อิน (in)

English meaning: a preposition 

Thai meaning: being “into” something

Example:  
ตอนนี้แม่กำลังอินเรื่องการปลูกต้นไม้
dtaawn-níi-mâae-gam-lang-in-rûueang-gaan-bplùuk-dtôn-mái
Right now, mom is so into planting.

6 – Fitness 

Thai word: ฟิตเนส (fít-nèet)

English meaning: a term referring to being physically fit and healthy

Thai meaning: a fitness center or gym

Example:  
ฤดีไปออกกำลังกายที่ฟิตเนสทุกวัน
rúe-dii-bpai-àawk-gam-lang-gaai-thîi-fít-nèet-thúk-wan
Ruedee goes to the gym every day.

A Woman being Spotted on the Bench Press at the Gym

I go to the ‘gym,’ not the ‘fitness.’

7 – Over 

Thai word: โอเวอร์ (oo-vôoe)

English meaning: an adjective (Winter is almost over.) / a preposition (over the mountain) / an adverb (the puddle he jumped over) / a prefix (The light was overhead.)

Thai meaning: to exaggerate

Example:  
อย่าพูดจาโอเวอร์ไปหน่อยเลย
yàa-phûut-jaa-oo-vôoe-bpai-nàauy-looei
Don’t over exaggerate.

8 – Gay 

Thai word: เกย์ (gee)

English meaning: homosexual

Thai meaning: male homosexual

Explanation: While the English word can refer to both male and female homosexuals, the Thai word only refers to males.

Example:  
พัฒน์เป็นเกย์
phát-bpen-gee
Pat is gay.

9 – Wave

Thai word: เวฟ (wéep)

English meaning: sea wave / a hand gesture used for greeting

Thai meaning: to warm food or a drink in a microwave oven

Explanation: Thai people shorten the word “microwave” and use it as a verb.

Example:  
หลังจากนำออกจากตู้เย็น ให้เอาไปเวฟ 1 นาที
lǎng-jàak-nam-àawk-jàak-dtûu-yen hâi-aao-bpai-wéep-nùeng-naa-thi
Warm this in the microwave for 1 minute after taking it out from the fridge.

10 – Pretty 

Thai word: พริตตี้ (phrít-dtîi)

English meaning: beautiful or cute

Thai meaning: model

Example:  
พริตตี้ที่งานมอเตอร์โชว์สวยมาก
phrít-dtîi-thîi-ngaan-maaw-dtôoe-shoo-sǔuai-mâak
Models at the auto show are very beautiful.

2. English Loanwords Used in Thai 

คำทับศัพท์ (kham-tháp-sàp) means “English loanwords.” 

The difference between English loanwords in Thai and Tinglish is that loanwords retain their original English meaning. There are a lot of English words used in Thai, so we’ve prepared a list of the most common loanwords by category.

1 – Food

  • apple = แอบเปิ้ล (áep-bpôoen)
  • strawberry = สตอเบอร์รี่ (sà-dtraaw-booe-rîi)
  • blueberry = บลูเบอร์รี่ (bluu-booe-rîi)
  • berry = เบอร์รี่ (booe-rîi)
  • cherry = เชอร์รี่ (chooe-rîi)
  • kiwi = กีวี่ (gii-wîi)
  • soup = ซุป (súp)
  • hotdog = ฮ็อทดอก (hót-dòk)
  • burger = เบอร์เกอร์ (booe-gôoe)
  • french fries = เฟรนซ์ฟราย (frén-fraai)
  • macaroni = มักกะโรนี (mák-gà-roo-ni)
  • spaghetti = สปาเก็ตตี้ (sà-bpa-gét-dtîi)
  • pasta = พาสต้า (pháat-dtâa)
  • pie = พาย (phaai)
  • ham = แฮม (haaem)
  • carrot = แครอท (khee-ràawt)
  • broccoli = บล็อคโคลี่ (bláwk-khoo-lîi)
  • cheese = ชีส (chíit)
  • mustard = มัสตาร์ด (mát-dtàat)
  • mayonnaise = มายองเนส (maa-yaawng-néet)
  • barley = บาร์เลย์ (baa-lèe)
  • quinoa = คีนัว (khii-nuua)
  • almond = อัลมอนด์ (an-môn)
  • macadamia = แม็คคาเดเมีย (máek-khaa-dee-miia)
  • walnut = วอลนัท (waaw-nát)
  • jam = แยม (yaaem)
  • cake = เค้ก (khêek)
  • cookie = คุ้กกี้ (khúk-gîi)
  • chocolate = ช็อคโกแล็ต (chók-goo-láaet)
  • vanilla = วะนิลา (vá-ní-laa)
  • sauce = ซอส (sáawt)
  • toffee = ท็อฟฟี่ (thóp-fîi)
  • ice cream = ไอศครีม (ai-sà-khriim)
  • soda = โซดา (soo-daa)
  • rum = รัม (ram)
  • brandy = บรั่นดี (bràn-dii)
  • whiskey = วิสกี้ (vít-gîi)
  • beer = เบียร์ (biia)

An Image of Several Grains, Nuts, Fruits, and Veggies

There are many English loanwords related to food and drinks.

2 – Sports 

  • golf = กอล์ฟ (gáawp)
  • ball = บอล (baawn)
  • football = ฟุตบอล (fút-baawn)
  • basketball = บาสเก็ตบอล (báat-gêt-baawn)
  • tennis = เทนนิส (then-nít)
  • ski = สกี (sà-gii)
  • skateboard = สเก็ตบอร์ด (sà-gét-bàawt
  • bowling = โบว์ลิ่ง (boo-lîng)
  • captain = กัปตัน (gàp-dtan)
  • game = เกม (geem)
  • foul = ฟาวล์ (faao)

3 – Music 

  • piano = เปียโน (bpiia-noo)
  • guitar = กีตาร์ (gii-dtâa)
  • violin = ไวโอลิน (vai-oo-lin)
  • flute = ฟลุ๊ต (flút)
  • bass = เบส (bèet)
  • note = โน๊ต (nóot)
  • chord = คอร์ด (khàawt)
  • chorus = คอรัส (khaaw-rát)
  • microphone = ไมโครโฟน (mai-khroo-foon)
  • single = ซิงเกิล (sing-gôoen)
  • album = อัลบัม (an-la-bâm)
  • show = โชว์ (shoo)
  • concert = คอนเสิร์ต (khaawn-sòoet)

4 – Automobiles and Electronics

  • gear = เกียร์ (giia)
  • brake = เบรก (brèek)
  • bus = บัส (bàt)
  • tractor = แทรกเตอร์ (thráek-dtôoe)
  • taxi = แท็กซี่ (tháek-sîi)
  • technology = เทคโนโลยี (thék-noo-loo-yii)
  • computer = คอมพิวเตอร์ (khaawm-phíu-dtôoe)
  • notebook = โน๊ตบุ๊ค (nóot-búk)
  • keyboard = คีย์บอร์ด (khii-bàawt)
  • mouse = เมาส์ (máo)
  • plug = ปลั๊ก (bplák)
  • internet = อินเตอร์เน็ท (in-dtooe-nèt
  • website = เว็บไซต์ (wép-sái)
  • digital = ดิจิตอล (dí-gì-dtân)
  • update = อัพเดท (áp-dèet)

5 – Academics

  • graph = กราฟ (gráap)
  • quota = โควต้า (khoo-dtâa)
  • nuclear = นิวเคลียร์ (niu-kriia)
  • protein = โปรตีน (bproo-dtiin)
  • carbohydrate = คาร์โบไฮเดรต (khaa-boo-hai-drèet)
  • physic = ฟิสิกส์ (fí-sìk)
  • cell = เซลล์ (seen)
  • spore = สปอร์ (sà-bpoo)
  • course = คอร์ส (kháawt)
  • fossil = ฟอสซิล (fót-sîn)
  • thesis = ธีสิส (thii-sìt)
  • grade = เกรด (grèet)

6 – Clothes and Cosmetics 

  • bra = บรา (braa)
  • boxer shorts = บ็อกเซอร์ (bók-sôoe)
  • necktie = เน็คไท (nék-thai)
  • jeans = ยีนส์ (yiin)
  • dress = เดรส (dréet)
  • lipstick = ลิปสติก (líp-sà-dtìk)
  • eyeshadow = อายชาโดว์ (aai-shaa-dôo)
  • brush on = บรัชออน (bràt-aawn)
  • mascara = มาสคาร่า (máat-khaa-râa)
  • toner = โทนเนอร์ (thoon-nôoe)
  • moisturizer = มอยซ์เจอร์ไรเซอร์ (máauy-jooe-rái-sôoe)
  • lotion = โลชั่น (loo-chân)

7 – Places

  • office = ออฟฟิศ (áawp-fít)
  • clinic = คลีนิก (khlii-nìk)
  • resort = รีสอร์ท (rii-sàawt)
  • apartment = อพาร์ทเมนท์ (a-pháat-mén)
  • condominium = คอนโดมิเนียม (khon-doo-mí-nîiam)
  • club = คลับ (khlàp)
  • bar = บาร์ (baa)
  • farm = ฟาร์ม (faam)
  • lift = ลิฟท์ (líp)

8 – Animals 

  • giraffe = ยีราฟ (yii-ráap)
  • hippopotamus = ฮิปโปโปเตมัส (híp-bpoo-bpoo-dtee-mát)
  • koala = โคอาล่า (khoo-aa-lâa)
  • panda = แพนด้า (phaaen-dâa)
  • penguin = เพนกวิน (phen-gwîn)
  • dinosaur = ไดโนเสาร์ (dai-noo-sǎo)

A Mother Koala Bear with Its Baby

A lot of animal names in Thai are English loanwords.

9 – Health and Hospitals 

  • vitamin = วิตามิน (wi-dtaa-min)
  • vaccine = วัคซีน (wák-siin)
  • serum = เซรุ่ม (see-rûm)
  • virus = ไวรัส (wai-rát)
  • bacteria = แบคทีเรีย (bàaek-thii-riia)
  • X-ray = เอ็กซ์เรย์ (ék-sà-ree)
  • CT-scan = ซีทีแสกน (sii-thii-sà-gaaen)

10 – Verbs

  • copy = ก็อบปี้ (gáawp-bpîi)
  • click = คลิก (khlík)
  • cheer = เชียร์ (chiia)
  • charge = ชาร์จ (cháat)
  • check = เช็ค (chék)
  • shopping = ชอปปิ้ง (cháawp-bpîng)
  • print = ปรินท์ (bprín)

11 – Other English Loanwords in Thai 

  • plastic = พลาสติก (phláat-sà-dtìk)
  • gas = แก็ส (gáaet)
  • card = การ์ด (gáat)
  • cartoon = การ์ตูน (gaa-dtuun)
  • coupon = คูปอง (khuu-bpaawng)
  • guide = ไกด์ (gái)
  • tour = ทัวร์ (thuua)
  • queue = คิว (khiu)
  • spray = สเปร์ย (sà-phree)
  • spa = สปา (sà-bpaa)
  • TV = ทีวี (thii-wii)

3. How to Say These Names in Thai

In addition to คำทับศัพท์ (kham-tháp-sàp), or “loanwords,” there are many English words in the Thai language that derive directly from global brands or names. Like loanwords, these words have a different pronunciation in Thai. Read through this useful list we’ve compiled to get a better idea of how to pronounce global names in the Thai language! 

1 – Restaurant and Cafe Brands 

  • McDonald’s = แม็คโดนัล (máek-doo-nân)
  • KFC = เค เอฟ ซี (khee-éep-sii)
  • Burger King = เบอร์เกอร์ คิง (booe-gôoe-khing)
  • 7-Eleven = เซเว่น อีเลเว่น (see-wêen-ii-lee-wêen)
  • Family Mart = แฟมิลี่มาร์ท (faaem-mí-lîi-màat)
  • Starbucks = สตาร์บัค (sà-dtaa-bák)
  • Au Bon Pain = โอบองแปง (oo-baawng-bpaaeng)
  • Swensen = สเวนเซ่นส์ (sà-wên-sên)

2 – Entertainment-Related Names 

  • Marvel = มาร์เวล (maa-wêen)
  • Disney = ดิสนีย์ (dít-nîi)
  • Harry Potter = แฮร์รี่ พ็อตเตอร์ (haae-rîi-pháawt-dtôoe)
  • Lord of the Rings = ลอร์ด ออฟ เดอะ ริงส์ (làawt-áawp-dòe-ring)
  • Star Wars = สตาร์ วอร์ (sà-dtaa-waaw)
  • Iron Man = ไอรอนแมน (ai-râawn-maaen)
  • Captain America = กัปตันอเมริกา (gàp-dtan-à-mee-rí-gaa)
  • Hulk = ฮัค (hák)
  • Thor = ธอร์ (thaaw)
  • Black Widow = แบล็ควิโดว์ (bláaek-wí-dôo)
  • Hawkeye = ฮอร์คอาย (háawk-aai)
  • Spider-Man = สไปเดอร์แมน (sà-bpái-dôoe-maaen)
  • Antman = แอนท์แมน (áaen-maaen)
  • X-men = เอ็กซ์เมน (ék-meen)
  • Batman = แบทแมน (báaet-maaen)
  • Superman = ซุปเปอร์แมน (súp-phôoe-maaen)
  • Wonder Woman = วอนเดอร์วูแมน (wáawn-dôoe-wuu-mâaen)
  • Aquaman = อควาแมน (à-khwâa-maaen)
  • MIB = เอ็ม ไอ บี (em-ai-bii)
  • Transformers = ทรานซ์ฟอร์เมอร์ (thraan-faaw-môoe)
  • Toy Story = ทอยสตอรี่ (thaauy-sà-dtaaw-rîi)
  • Frozen = โฟรเซ่น (froo-sên)
  • Lion King = ไลออน คิงส์ (lai-âawn-king)
  • Mulan = มู่หลาน (mûu-lǎan)
  • Beauty and the Beast = บิวตี้ แอนด์ เดอะ บีสต์ (biu-dtîi-aaen-dòe-bìit)
  • Maleficent = มาลิฟิเซนต์ (ma-lí-fi-sén)

A Cartoon Drawing of Thor

Thor is ธอร์ in Thai.

3 – Singer and Band Names

  • Maroon 5 = มารูน ไฟฟ์ (maa-ruun-fái)
  • Linkin Park = ลินคิน พาร์ค (lin-khîn-pháak)
  • Black Eyed Peas = แบล็ค อาย พี (bláaek-aai-phii)
  • One Direction = วัน ไดเร็คชั่น (wan-dai-rék-chân)
  • The Pussycat Dolls = พุซซี่ แคทดอล (phút-sîi-kháet-daawn)
  • Fifth Harmony = ฟิฟ ฮาร์โมนี่ (fít-haa-moo-nîi)
  • Coldplay = โคล เพลย์ (khoo-phlee)
  • Beyonce = บียองเซ่ (bii-yaawng-sêe)
  • Taylor Swift = เทเลอร์ สวิฟต์ (thee-lôoe-sà-wíp)
  • Katy Perry = เคที่ เพร์รี (khee-thîi-phee-rîi)
  • Kanye = คานเย (khaan-yêe)
  • Snoop Dogg = สนูป ดอกซ์ (sà-núup-dáawk)
  • Jennifer Lopez = เจนนิเฟอร์ โลเปซ (jee-ní-fôoe-loo-phéet)
  • Mariah Carey = มาราย แครี่ (maa-raai-khee-rîi)
  • Charlie Puth = ชาร์ลี พุท (chaa-lii-phút)
  • Celine Dion = เซลีน ดีออน (see-riin-dii-aawn)
  • Nicki Minaj = นิคกี้ มินาจ (ník-gîi-míi-nàat)
  • Meghan Trainor = เมแกน เทรนเนอร์ (mee-gaaen-three-nôoe)
  • Justin Bieber = จัสติน บีเบอร์ (ját-thin-bii-bôoe)
  • Eminem = เอ็มมิเน็ม (em-mí-nem)
  • Selena Gomez = เซลาน่า โกเมซ (see-lee-nâa-goo-méet)
  • Bruno Mars = บรูโน่ มาร์ส (bluu-nôo-maa)

4 – Clothing Brands 

  • Victoria’s Secret = วิคตอเรีย ซีเคร็ท (wík-dtaaw-riia-sii-khrèt)
  • Playboy = เพลย์บอล (phlee-baauy)
  • H&M = เอช แอนด์ เอ็ม (éet-aaen-em)
  • Zara = ซาร่า (saa-râa)
  • Mango = แมงโก้ (maaeng-gôo)
  • Uniqlo = ยูนิโคล่ (uu-ní-khlôo)
  • Nike = ไนกี้ (nai-gîi)
  • Adidas = อาดิดาส (aa-di-dáat)
  • Puma = พูม่า (phuu-mâa)
  • Topshop = ท็อปช็อป (tháawp-chàawp)
  • Mark & Spencer = มาร์ค แอนด์ สเปนเซอร์ (máak-aaen-sà-phen-sôoe)
  • Flipflop = ฟิตฟลอป (fít-flàawp)
  • Birkenstock = เบอร์เก็นสต็อค (booe-gên-sà-dtáawk)

5 – Cosmetic Brands 

  • Mac = แม็ค (máek)
  • Benefit = เบเนฟิต (bee-nee-fìt)
  • Bobby Brown = บ็อบบี้ บราวน์ (bóp-bîi-braao)
  • Kiehl’s = คีลส์ (khiin)
  • L’oreal = ลอรีอัล (laaw-ríi-ân)
  • Maybelline = เมเบอร์ลีน (mee-booe-liin)
  • Clinique = คลีนิค (khlii-nìk)
  • Lamer = ลาแมร์ (laa-maae)

6 – Bag Brands 

  • Chanel = ชาแนล (chaa-naaen)
  • Coach = โค้ช (khóot)
  • Prada = ปราด้า (bpraa-dâa)
  • Kate Spade = เคท สเปซ (khéet-sà-bpéet)
  • Louis Vuitton = หลุยส์ วิคตอง (lǔi-vít-dtaawng)
  • Gucci = กุชชี่ (gút-chîi)

7 – Grocery Brands 

  • Unilever = ยูนิลีเวอร์ (uu-ní-lii-wôoe)
  • P&G = พี แอนด์ จี (phii-aaen-jii)
  • Nestle = เนสท์เล่ (néet-lêe)
  • Lion = ไลอ้อน (lai-âawn)

Conclusion

By now, you’ve learned many of the most popular English words in the Thai language. We bet you can remember most (if not all) of them, as they sound so similar to their English equivalents. Because Thai people use these words so often, memorizing them is an important step in your language learning journey. 

Were you surprised by any of the words on our list? Let us know in the comments, and feel free to list any more loanwords you know about! 

And as always, don’t forget to explore ThaiPod101.com to find more interesting lessons. Not sure where to start? Here are a few we think you’ll like: 

Happy learning, and have fun practicing your Tinglish!

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Popular Thai Quotes and Proverbs

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When learning a language, you’re bound to come across a word or phrase that truly impresses you. Language learning is about so much more than figuring out how to communicate; it’s also about discovering a culture that’s different from yours and becoming immersed in a new way of thinking.

Since you’re learning Thai, it makes sense to study Thai quotes. In addition to picking up some of the language, you can gain insight about Thai values and beliefs from these words of wit and wisdom. In particular, you’ll find that many Thai quotes are influenced by Buddhism, the country’s main religion. 

In this lesson, ThaiPod101.com will present you with a list of Thai quotes in English that you should know.  From Thai motivational quotes to popular proverbs, you’ll have a ton of inspiring words to reflect on by the time you get to the end!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Thai Quotes About Work
  2. Thai Quotes About Life
  3. Thai Quotes About Time
  4. Thai Quotes About Love
  5. Thai Quotes About Friends and Family
  6. Thai Quotes About Happiness
  7. Thai Quotes About Language Learning
  8. Conclusion

1. Thai Quotes About Work

Let’s start with Thai quotes about success and work. As work is an important part of our lives, understanding Thai views on the topic will be immensely helpful to you as a learner.


1. เลือกทำงานที่เรารัก และจะไม่มีวันไหนที่รู้สึกว่าต้องทำงานเลย

Pronunciation: lûueak-tham-ngaan-thîi-rao-rák láe-jà-mâi-mii-wan-nǎi-thîi-rǔu-sùek-wâa-dtâawng- tham-ngaan-looei

Meaning: Choose the work you love and there won’t be a day you feel you have to work.

Author: Confucius (Chinese philosopher)

2. งานทุกอย่างที่สุจริตเป็นงานที่มีเกียรติทั้งนั้น

Pronunciation: ngaan-thúk-yàang-thîi-sùt-jà-rìt-bpen-ngaan-thîi-mii-gìiat-tháng-nán

Meaning: All trustworthy jobs are honorable.

Author: Panya Nanthaphiku (famous Thai monk)

This quote aims to teach people that all jobs are honorable, as long as they are legal and not immoral. You shouldn’t be ashamed of your job, for example, if it doesn’t pay well or is a labor job—at least you’re working!

3. งานที่เราชอบจะทำให้เราชอบทำงาน 

Pronunciation: ngaan-thîi-rao-châawp-jà-tham-hâi-rao-châawp-tham-ngaan

Meaning: The work you like makes you like to work.

Author: Wattana Weerayawattanon (singer and songwriter)

I Love My Job

4. อย่าทำงานเพื่อเก็บเงินไปใช้ในห้อง “ไอ ซี ยู”

Pronunciation: yàa-tham-ngaan-phûuea-gèp-ngoen-bpai-chái-nai-hâawng-ai-sii-yuu

Meaning: Don’t work and save money to spend it later for ICU.

Author: Meethiwachirodom (famous Thai monk)

This quote teaches the importance of time management and health. Some people work too much to earn a lot of money. As a result, they fail to take care of their health and end up spending all of their savings on hospital bills when they’re older and not as healthy as they used to be.

2. Thai Quotes About Life

Are you feeling stuck or dissatisfied with your life? There are a number of Thai quotes about life that teach valuable lessons you can apply to your situation right away. (These are also Instagram-friendly!)

    → Learn how to talk about Life Events in our relevant lesson, and be prepared for any major occasion in Thailand.

5. ชีวิตคนเรา…แสนสั้นเกินกว่าจะทำให้ทุกคน…พอใจ… และเชื่อว่าไม่มีใครคนไหนทำได้ 

Pronunciation: chii-wít-khon-rao-sǎaen-sân-gooen-gwàa-jà-tham-hâi-thúk-khon-phaaw-jai láe- chûuea-wâa-mâi-mii-khrai-khon-nǎi-tham-dâi

Meaning: Life is too short to be lived in order to please everyone, and there is no one who is capable of it. 

Author: Kutto (singer)

6. บ่อยครั้ง เรามักเผลอเอาสายตาของคนอื่นมาเป็นเครื่องวัดคุณค่าของเรา 

Pronunciation: bàauy-khráng rao-mák-phlǒoe-ao-sǎai-dtaa-khǎawng-khon-ùuen-maa-bpen- khrûueang-wát-khun-khâa-khǎawng-rao

Meaning: We often inadvertently use others’ judgement to value ourselves.

Author: Phaisan Visalo (famous Thai monk)

7. ถ้าคุณไม่อาจควบคุมอารมณ์ที่เกิดขึ้นมา อารมณ์จะพิพากษาชีวิตคุณ 

Pronunciation: thâa-khun-mâi-àat-khûuap-khum-aa-rom-thîi-gòoet-khûen-maa aa-rom-jà-phí-phâak- sǎa-chii-vít-khun

Meaning: If you cannot control your emotions, they will judge your life.

Author: Jatupol Chomphunit (famous orator)

People can be irrational and act cruel when they’re angry, and end up hurting someone or having regrets about what they said. Just one action controlled by anger can ruin your life.

Control Your Anger

8. ทางไปสู่ความลำบากนั้น…ไปสบาย ทางไปสู่ความสบายนั้น…ไปลำบาก 

Pronunciation: thaang-bpai-sùu-khwaam-lam-bàak-nán-bpai-sà-bàai thaang-bpai-sùu-khwaam-sà- baai-nán-lam-bàak

Meaning: The road to hardship is comfort but the road to comfort is hard.

Author: Su Boonliang (artist)

To live your life comfortably, you have to study and work hard to be successful in work (and vice-versa).  

9. การหาความมั่นคงในชีวิต ก็เหมือนคาดหวังว่าดวงอาทิตย์จะอยู่บนฟ้าตลอดเวลา 

Pronunciation: gaan-hǎa-khwaam-mân-khong-nai-chii-vít gâaw-mǔuean-khâat-wǎng-wâa-duuang- aa-thít-jà-yùu-bon-fáa-dtà-làawt-wee-laa

Meaning: To find stability in life is like expecting the sun to always be in the sky.

Author: Win Liaowarin (writer)

Buddhism teaches that one should never become attached to things—whether it be money, assets, one’s reputation or honor, etc.—because you can lose everything in a moment. Stability in life is another thing that one can lose; it’s impossible for one’s life to always be stable.  

3. Thai Quotes About Time

Time is precious. Study these Thai quotes about time to gain insight into how Thai people view this phenomenon. 


10. สายน้ำไม่ไหลย้อยกลับ 

Pronunciation: sǎai-nám-mâi-lǎi-yáawn-glàp

Meaning: The river has no return.

Author: quote from a song

11. อย่ามีชีวิต ชนิดที่เวลาผ่านมาแล้ว…มานึกเสียดายทีหลัง

Pronunciation: yàa-mii-chii-vít chá-nít-thîi-wee-laa-phâan-maa-láaeo maa-núek-sǐia-daai-thii-lǎng

Meaning: Don’t live your life in a way that you would regret when time passes.

Author: Wongthanong Chainarongsingh (founder of A Day magazine)

12. ระยะเวลา บอกแค่ว่าเรารู้จักกันนาน แต่ไม่ได้การันตีว่ารู้จักกันดี 

Pronunciation: rá-yá-wee-laa bàawk-wâa-rao-rúu-jàk-gàn-naan dtàae-mâi-dâi-gaa-ran-thii-wâa-rúu- jàk-gan-dii

Meaning: Time reflects that we have known each other for long, but doesn’t mean we know each other well.

Author: Napaporn Traiwitwareegul (DJ)

You can know someone for years and still not really know who they are as a person. 

13. การให้เวลา อาจมีค่ากว่าสิ่งของพิเศษ 

Pronunciation: gaan-hâi-wee-laa àat-mii-khâa-mâak-khwàa-sìng-khǎawng-phí-sèet

Meaning: Giving time is more precious than a special gift

Author: Round finger (writer)

14. เวลาและวารีไม่เคยคอยใคร 

Pronunciation: wee-laa-láe-waa-rii-mâi-khooei-raaw-khrai

Meaning: Time and tide wait for no man.

Author: Proverb

4. Thai Quotes About Love

Are you madly in love with someone? Or perhaps you’re a hopeless romantic? Either way, we think you’ll enjoy reading through these Thai love quotes with English translations!


15. รักแลกด้วยรัก ไม่ได้แลกด้วยชีวิต 

Pronunciation: rák-lâaek-dûuai-rák mâi-dâi-lâaek-dûuai-chii-vít

Meaning: To get love, you give love, not life.

Author: Napaporn Traiwitwareegul (DJ)

This famous quote means that if you want someone to love you, give him or her your love, not everything in your life.

16. “อกหัก” เป็นเวลาที่ดีที่สุดที่จะพิสูจน์ว่า เรารักคนอื่นมากกว่ารักตัวเองหรือไม่ 

Pronunciation: òk-hàk-bpen-wee-laa-thîi-dii-thîi-sùt-thîi-jà-phí-sùut-wâa rao-rák-khon-ùuen-mâak- gwàa-rák-dtuua-eeng-rǔue-mâi

Meaning: “Being heartbroken” is the best time to prove whether you love others more than yourself or not.

Author: Win Liaowarin (writer)

17. บางครั้งสิ่งที่เลวร้ายกว่าการอกหัก …ก็คือการสมหวังได้แต่งงาน… แล้วไม่พบความสมหวังของชีวิตคู่ 

Pronunciation: baang-khráng-sìng-thîi-leeo-ráai-khwàa-gaan-òk-hàk gâaw-khuue-gaan-sǒm-wǎng- dâi-dtàaeng-ngaan láaeo-mâi-phóp-khwaam-sǒm-wǎng-khǎawng-chii-vít-khûu

Meaning: Sometimes, the thing that is worse than heartbreak is to get married as you hope for but not being happy in married life.

Author: Win Liaowarin (writer)

I Hope to Get Married Someday

18. มันไม่ยากหรอกที่จะพูดคำว่ารัก แต่มันยากนักที่จะรักอย่างเข้าใจ 

Pronunciation: man-mâi-yâak-ràawk-thîi-jà-phûut-kham-wâa-rák dtàae-man-yâak-nák-thîi-jà-rák- yàang-khâo-jai

Meaning: It is not hard to confess love, but it is hard to love someone with comprehension.

Author: Mahasompong (famous Thai monk)

When you love someone, it’s easy to say so out loud. However, it is hard to love him or her with comprehension; to love is to support, not to intrude.  

19. อย่าวิ่งตามใครซักคนจนเราไม่เห็นคุณค่าของตัวเอง 

Pronunciation: yàa-wîng-dtaam-khrai-sák-khon-jon-rao-mâi-hěn-khun-khâa-khǎawng-dtuua-eeng

Meaning: Don’t chase someone to the point where you no longer see value in yourself. 

Author: Napaporn Traiwitwareegul (DJ)

When you love someone, you try hard to make him or her love you back. Sometimes, you try so hard to be the person they want that you no longer see good things in yourself.

5. Thai Quotes About Friends and Family

If you want to learn how friendship and family are perceived in Thai culture, these Thai quotes about family and friends are a great place to start.


20. อย่าแคร์คนอื่นมากกว่าครอบครัว อย่าตามใจตัวจนลืมว่าครอบครัวก็สำคัญ 

Pronunciation: yàa-khaae-khon-ùuen-mâak-gwàa-khrâawp-khruua yàa-dtaam-jai-dtuua-jon-luuem- wâa-khrâawp-khruua-gâaw-sǎm-khan

Meaning: Don’t care about others more than your family and don’t be self-indulgent to the point where you forget that family is also important.

Author: Mahasompong (famous Thai monk)

My Happy Family

21. นับเพื่อน อย่านับตอนดี ๆ นับตอนที่ชีวิตกำลังแย่ กำลังตกต่ำ นั่นแหละเพื่อนแท้ 

Pronunciation: náp-phûuen yàa-náp-dtaawn-dii-dii náp-dtaawn-thîi-chii-vít-gam-lang-yâae gam-lang-dtòk-dtàm nân-làae-phûuen-tháae

Meaning: Don’t count the number of friends when your life is good. You will know the number of your true friends when your life is at its worst. 

Author: Kutto (singer)

22. เพื่อนที่ไม่ยอมหรือไม่อาจตักเตือนเพื่อน ก็ต้องถือว่าหมดความเป็นเพื่อนเสียแล้ว 

Pronunciation: phûuen-thîi-mâi-yaawm-rǔue-mâi-àat-dtàk-dtuuen-phûuen gâaw-dtâawng-thǔue- wâa-mòt-khwaam-bpen-phûuen-sǐia-láaeo

Meaning: A friend who doesn’t or cannot give you criticism is no longer your friend.

Author: Phuthathatphiku (famous Thai monk) 

To be friends with someone, you must have good intentions toward them. Thus, friends must be able to tell each other if they do wrong and keep each other accountable for their actions.

23. เพื่อนกินหาง่าย เพื่อนตายหายาก 

Pronunciation: phûuen-gin-hǎa-ngâai phûuen-dtaai-hǎa-yâak

Meaning: A faithful friend is hard to find.

Author: Proverb

24. เลือดข้นกว่าน้ำ 

Pronunciation: lôoet-khôn-gwàa-nám

Meaning: Blood is thicker than water.

Author: Proverb

6. Thai Quotes About Happiness

Everyone wants to be happy, but not everyone is happy nowadays. We hope that these quotes help you find happiness in life.


25. ที่สุดของคน คือ การเป็นคนธรรมดาที่มีความสุข 

Pronunciation: thîi-sùt-khǎawng-khon khuue-gaan-bpen-khon-tham-má-daa-thîi-mii-khwaam-sùk

Meaning: The best thing a man can ask for is to be a normal person who is happy.

Author: Meethiwachirodom (famous Thai monk)

26. อย่ามองหาสิ่งที่ขาด จนพลาดที่จะมีความสุขกับสิ่งที่มี 

Pronunciation: yàa-maawng-hǎa-sìng-thîi-khàat jon-plâat-thîi-jà-mii-khwaam-sùk-gàp-sìng-thîi-mii

Meaning: Don’t try to achieve things you don’t have to the point you fail to be happy with what you have.

Author: Saithip Montrigul Na Ayudhya (DJ)

Sometimes, you only see the things that you don’t have and try hard to get them. In doing so, you fail to enjoy the things you already have. For example, you want to be the most successful businessman, so you work so hard that you no longer have time for your family.

27. อย่าหยุดตัวเองไว้กับความทุกข์ คุณมีสิทธิที่จะมีความสุขไม่น้อยกว่าคนอื่น 

Pronunciation: yàa-yhùt-dtuua-eeng-wái-gàp-khwaam-thúk khun-mii-sìt-thîi-jà-mii-khwaam-sùk-mâi- náauy-gwàa-khon-ùuen

Meaning: Don’t drown yourself in sadness, you have the right to be happy as much as everybody.

Author: Meethiwachirodom (famous Thai monk)

You Have the Right to be Happy

7. Thai Quotes About Language Learning

To close, let’s look at a couple of inspirational Thai quotes from language teachers about language learning! 

28. ภาษาคือการสื่อสารกันและกัน ตราบใดที่สื่อสารกันแล้วรู้เรื่อง นั่นก็ยอดเยี่ยมแล้ว 

Pronunciation: phaa-sǎa-khuue-gaan-sùue-sǎan-gan-láe-gan dtràap-dai-thîi-sùue-sǎan-gan-láaeo- rúu-rûueang nân-gâaw-yàawt-yìiam-láaeo

Meaning: Language is about communication. As long as it’s understandable, that’s great.

Author: Khanatip Sunthornrak (famous English teacher)

This quote teaches that when you learn a new language, you shouldn’t worry too much about all of the details (such as grammar or accents) as it discourages you from speaking. Instead, do your best to communicate; as long as the other parties understand, that is already a success.

29. การเรียนไม่ใช่เรื่องยาก ถ้ามองอุปสรรคเห็น และทำลายอุปสรรคเป็น 

Pronunciation: gaan-riian-mâi-châi-rûueang-yâak thâa-maawng-ùp-bphà-sàk-hěn láe-tham-laai-ùp- bphà-sàk-bpen

Meaning: Learning is not hard if you know the obstacle and how to overcome it.

Author: Somsri Thammasansophon (famous English teacher)

When you learn a new language, there will be areas that you excel in and others you’re not as good at. All you need to do is focus on your weaknesses and find a good learning method to help you overcome them.

I’m Inspired by Thai Quotes

8. Conclusion

Do you feel inspired and motivated after reading all of these Thai quotes and proverbs? Does your native language have similar quotes? Share with us in the comments below.

Learning Thai quotes can be a little difficult if you don’t know much vocabulary. That said, it is a good way to familiarize yourself with the Thai language and culture. Keep practicing! 

When you feel ready to move forward, ThaiPod101.com has many more useful lessons for you, such as words about sickness or taking a trip to Tiger Temple.

Happy learning!

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Must-Know Thai Business Phrases and Vocabulary

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Why are you learning Thai?  

One of the most common reasons people learn the language is that they’re doing business in Thailand or with Thai people. This makes a lot of sense, because knowing at least the most common business phrases in Thai is an advantage in the workplace. 

In this lesson, you’ll learn all of the Thai business phrases you need to get started, as well as the grammar behind them. In addition, we’ll provide you with a list of business terms you should know, categorized by what kind of situation you’d hear them in. 

Improve your Thai business language today!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Getting Started
  2. Thai Business Phrases for a Job Interview
  3. Thai Business Phrases for Coworker Interaction
  4. Phrases for a Thai Business Meeting
  5. Thai Business Phrases for Phone Calls and Emails
  6. Thai Business Phrases for a Business Trip
  7. Conclusion

1. Getting Started

Jobs

Before we get into Thai business words and their meanings in English, you should know how to speak formally with others in a business setting.

1- Formal Thai Pronouns

Below is a list of Thai pronouns you’re likely to use in Thailand business settings, so we advise you to memorize them before you try learning any other Thai business words or phrases.

2- Khráp and Khâ

To make a sentence sound formal in Thai, put the word ครับ (khráp) or ค่ะ (khà) at the end of a sentence when speaking. ครับ (khráp) is used when the speaker is male, while ค่ะ (khâ) is used when the speaker is female. 

2. Thai Business Phrases for a Job Interview

Job Interview

The first step in beginning your career is the job interview. As such, it’s to your advantage that you leave a nice first impression on your interviewer. Here are some common Thai business phrases you should know before your interview. 

1- Phrases Your Interviewer May Use

Hello.

  • In Thai: สวัสดี 
  • Pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii

While saying สวัสดี (sà-wàt-dii), it is best to do the action called ไหว้ (whâi), which is a Thai way of greeting.

Please have a seat.

  • In Thai: เชิญนั่ง 
  • Pronunciation: chooen-nâng

In Thai culture, it’s best to wait for your interviewer to ask you to sit down before you do so.

Please turn off your phone.

  • In Thai: กรุณาปิดโทรศัพท์มือถือด้วย 
  • Pronunciation: gà-rú-naa-bpìt-thoo-rá-sàp-muue-thǔue-dúuai

An interviewer will normally ask you to turn off your phone. If your phone rings during the interview, it may leave a bad impression on your interviewer, so it is proper Thai business etiquette to turn it off right away. 

However, if there’s any reason you can’t turn it off, you can tell the interviewer: ไม่สะดวกปิดโทรศัพท์ เพราะ___ ต้องขอโทษด้วย (mâi-sà-dùuak-bpìt-thoo-rá-sàp práw___ dtâawng-khǎaw-thôot-dûuai), which means “I can’t turn off the phone because ___, I’m sorry.”

Please introduce yourself.

  • In Thai: กรุณาแนะนำตัว 
  • Pronunciation: gà-rú-naa-náe-nam-dtuua
Please Introduce Yourself

What is your strength and weakness?

  • In Thai: ข้อดีและข้อเสียของคุณคืออะไร 
  • Pronunciation: khâaw-dii-láe-khâaw-sǐia-khǎawng-khun-khuue-à-rai

Do you have any questions?

  • In Thai: มีคำถามอะไรจะถามมั้ย 
  • Pronunciation: mii-kham-thǎam-à-rai-jà-thǎam-mái

2- List of Phrases You May Use

My name is ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันชื่อ ___ 
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-chûue-___

I graduated from ___ University in the faculty of ___, majoring in ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันเรียนจบจากมหาวิทยาลัย___คณะ___ สาขา___ 
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-riian-jòp-jàak-má-hǎa-wít-thá-yaa-lai-___-khá-ná-___-sǎa-khǎa-___

In the first blank, put the name of your university; in the second blank, put the name of the faculty; and in the third blank, put the name of your major.

I have experience in ___ for ___ years.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันมีประสบการณ์ในสายงาน ___ ทั้งหมด ___ ปี 
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-mii-bprà-sòp-gaan-nai-sǎai-ngaan-___-tháng-mòt-___-bpii

In the first blank, put your field of experience; in the second blank, put the number of years you’ve been in that field.

My responsibility is ___.

  • In Thai: หน้าที่ของผม / ดิฉัน คือ ___
  • Pronunciation: nâa-thîi-khǎawng-phǒm / dì-chǎn-khuue-___

My strength is ___.

  • In Thai: ข้อดีของผม / ดิฉัน คือ ___
  • Pronunciation: khâaw-dii-khǎawng-phǒm / dì-chǎn-khuue-___

My weakness is ___.

  • In Thai: ข้อเสียของผม / ดิฉัน คือ ___
  • Pronunciation: khâaw-sǐia-khǎawng-phǒm / dì-chǎn-khuue-___

Please repeat the question again.

  • In Thai: ช่วยทวนคำถามได้มั้ย
  • Pronunciation: chûuai-thuuan-kham-thǎam-dâi-mái

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to be interviewed.

  • In Thai: ขอบคุณที่ให้โอกาสมาสัมภาษณ์งาน
  • Pronunciation: khàawp-khun-thîi-hâi-oo-gàat-maa-sǎm-phâat-ngaan

3. Thai Business Phrases for Coworker Interaction

Business Phrases

When doing business with Thai people, knowing business Thai vocabulary isn’t enough. You should also know how to communicate with your coworkers at both the business level and the social level. Here are some phrases you may find helpful.

1- Business Introductions

Self-introduction for males

  • สวัสดีครับ ผมชื่อ___เป็นพนักงานใหม่อยู่แผนก___ครับ
  • sà-wàt-dii-khráp phǒm-chûue-___-bpen-phá-nák-ngaan-mài-yùu-phá-nàaek-___-khráp
  • “Hello, my name is____. I’m a new employee in ___ Department.”

In the first blank, put your name; in the second blank, put your department. 

Self-introduction for females

  • สวัสดีค่ะ ดิฉันชื่อ___เป็นพนักงานใหม่อยู่แผนก___ค่ะ
  • sà-wàt-dii-khà dì-chǎn-chûue-___-bpen-phá-nák-ngaan-mài-yùu-phá-nàaek-___-khà
  • “Hello, my name is ___. I’m a new employee in ___ Department.”

Giving phone numbers and email

  • นี่คือเบอร์โทรและอีเมลของผม / ฉัน
  • nîi-khuue-booe-thoo-láe-ii-meeo-khǎawng-phǒm / chǎn
  • “This is my phone number and email.”

2- Business Performance Evaluations

Compliments about work performance

  • คุณทำดีมาก
  • khun-tham-dii-mâak
  • “You did a great job.”
  • ผลงานของคุณดีมาก
  • phǒn-ngaan-khǎawng-khun-dii-mâak
  • “Your performance is very good.”
  • อันนี้ใช้ได้แล้ว
  • an-níi-chái-dâi-láaeo
  • “This one is okay.”

Feedback about work performance

  • อันนี้ไม่ผ่านนะ ไปแก้มาใหม่
  • an-níi-mâi-phàan-ná bpai-gâae-maa-mài
  • “This one needs to be fixed.”
  • ช่วงนี้คุณทำงานไม่ค่อยดีเท่าไหร่ มีปัญหาอะไรรึเปล่า
  • chûuang-níi-khun-tham-ngaan-mâi-khâauy-dii-thâo-rài mii-bpan-hǎa-à-rai-rúe-bplào
  • “You are not doing well recently. Are there any problems?”

3- Phrases for Other Business Situations

Asking for help

  • ช่วยดูตรงนี้ให้หน่อยได้มั้ย
  • chûuai-duu-dtrong-níi-hâi-nàauy-dâi-mái
  • “Could you please take a look at this?”
Could You Please Take a Look at This?
  • ขอคำแนะนำเรื่อง___หน่อย
  • khǎaw-kham-náe-nam-rûueang-___-nàauy
  • “Please give me advice about___.”

Thank you

  • ขอบคุณ
  • khàawp-khun
  • Thank you.”

Sorry

  • ขอโทษ
  • khǎaw-thôot
  • Sorry.”

4. Phrases for a Thai Business Meeting

Let’s go over some important phrases for Thai business meetings. If you’ve spent any time in the business world, you know that meetings are an essential aspect of any job. Knowing the most common phrases and implementing proper Thai business meeting etiquette will give you a huge advantage. 

Let’s start the meeting.

  • In Thai: ขอเริ่มการประชุม
  • Pronunciation: khǎaw-rôoem-gaan-bprà-chum

Do you have any questions?

  • In Thai: มีคำถามอะไรมั้ย
  • Pronunciation: mii-kham-thǎam-à-rai-mái

Do you have any comments?

  • In Thai: มีความเห็นอะไรมั้ย
  • Pronunciation:mii-khwaam-hěn-à-rai-mái
Do You Have Any Comments?

I agree.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันเห็นด้วย
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-hěn-dûuai

I disagree.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันไม่เห็นด้วย
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-mâi-hěn-dûuai

What do you think about this?

  • In Thai: คุณมีความเห็นอย่างไรเกี่ยวกับเรื่องนี้
  • Pronunciation: khun-mii-khwaam-hěn-yàang-rai-gìiao-gàp-rûueang-níi

I think ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันคิดว่า___
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-khít-wâa

I want more information about ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันขอข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมเกี่ยวกับ___
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-khǎaw-khâaw-muun-gìiao-gàp-___

If we agree to this, will there be any problem?

  • In Thai: ถ้าเราตกลงตามนี้ จะมีปัญหาอะไรมั้ย
  • Pronunciation: thâa-rao-dtòk-long-dtaam-ní jà-mii-bpan-hǎa-à-rai-mái

If we agree to buy from you, what is your offer?

  • In Thai: ถ้าเราตกลงซื้อจากคุณ คุณมีข้อเสนออะไรให้เราบ้าง
  • Pronunciation: thâa-rao-dtòk-long-súue-jàak-khun khun-mii-khâaw-sà-nǒoe-à-rai-hâi-rao-bâang

Any discount?

  • In Thai: มีส่วนลดมั้ย
  • Pronunciation: mii-sùuan-lót-mái

I have a special offer.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันมีข้อเสนอพิเศษ
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-mii-khâaw-sà-nǒoe-phí-sèet

5. Thai Business Phrases for Phone Calls and Emails

If you’re doing business in Thailand, being able to communicate via phone and email is pretty important. Below are some words and phrases you’ll find useful.

1- Phrases for Phone Calls

Hello, this is ___. Whom do you want to speak to?

  • In Thai: สวัสดี ที่นี่___ ต้องการติดต่อใคร
  • Pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii thîi-níi-___ dtâawng-gaan-dtìt-dtàaw-khrai-khá

As a staff member of a company, this is the phrase you use to answer the phone.

Hello, I want to talk to ___.

  • In Thai: สวัสดี ขอเรียนสาย___
  • Pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii khǎaw-riian-sǎai___

You say this when you call someone in a company whom you don’t have direct contact with.

Hello, I Want to Talk to the Manager.

Hello, my name is ___. I’m calling from ___. [name of company]

  • In Thai: สวัสดี ผม / ดิฉันชื่อ… ติดต่อมาจาก___
  • Pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii phom / di-chan-chûue-___ dtìt-dtàaw-maa-jàak-___

This is another phrase you can use when calling someone. This one is a little more formal than the one above. It’s often used when the party you’re calling doesn’t know you.

Please wait for a moment, I will transfer you.

  • In Thai: เดี๋ยวจะโอนสายให้ รบกวนถือสายรอซักครู่
  • Pronunciation: dǐiao-jà-oon-sǎai-hâi róp-guuan-thǔue-sǎai-raaw-sák-khrûu

Now ___ isn’t available. Will you leave a message or give him/her a phone number to call back?

  • In Thai: ตอนนี้คุณ___ไม่สะดวกรับสาย จะฝากข้อความหรือเบอร์ติดต่อกลับไว้มั้ย
  • Pronunciation: dtaawn-níi-khun-___-mâi-sà-dùuak-ráp-sǎai jà-fâak-khâaw-khwaam-rǔue-booe- thoo-dtìt-dtàaw-glàp-wái-mái

That is okay. I will call again.

  • In Thai: ไม่เป็นไร เดี๋ยวจะติดต่อมาใหม่
  • Pronunciation: mâi-bpen-rai dǐiao-jà-dtìt-dtàaw-maa-mài

Phrase for ending a phone call

  • In Thai: แค่นี้นะ สวัสดี
  • Pronunciation: khâae-níi-ná sà-wàt-dii

2- Phrases for Email

Dear ___,

  • In Thai: เรียน
  • Pronunciation: riian

Please be informed accordingly

  • In Thai: จึงเรียนมาเพื่อทราบ
  • Pronunciation: jueng-riian-maa-phûuea-sâap

Best Regards,

  • In Thai: ขอแสดงความนับถือ
  • Pronunciation: khǎaw-sà-daaeng-khwaam-náp-thǔue

6. Thai Business Phrases for a Business Trip

Our final category is Thai phrases for business trips. If you travel a lot, you should remember these.

1- Making a Reservation

I want to book a one-way trip / round trip ___ [vehicle] ticket to ___ [place].

  • In Thai: ผม / ฉันต้องการจองตั๋ว ___ [vehicle] แบบเที่ยวเดียว / ไปกลับ ไปที่___ [place]
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / chǎn-dtâawng-gaan-jaawng-dtǔua-___-bàaep-thîiao-diiao / bpai-glàp -bpai-thîi-___

เที่ยวเดียว (thîiao-diiao) means “one-way trip,” while ไปกลับ (bpai-glàp) means “round trip.” 

I want to book a room for ___ people.

  • In Thai: ผม / ฉันต้องการจองห้องพักสำหรับ ___ คน
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / chǎn-dtâawng-gaan-jaawng-hâawng-phák-sǎm-ràp-___-khon

Which date do you want to check in?

  • In Thai: ลูกค้าต้องการเข้าพักวันไหนคะ
  • Pronunciation: lûuk-kháa-dtâawng-gaan-khâo-phák-wan-nǎi-khá

ลูกค้า (lûuk-kháa) means “customer” in Thai. Instead of using “you,” hotel staff often use ลูกค้า (lûuk-kháa) to refer to their customer.

How long do you want to stay?

  • In Thai: ลูกค้าต้องการพักกี่คืน
  • Pronunciation: lûuk-kháa-dtâawng-gaan-phák-gìi-khuuen

Any promotion or discount?

  • In Thai: มีโปรโมชั่นหรือส่วนลดอะไรมั้ย
  • Pronunciation: mii-bproo-moo-chân-rǔue-sùuan-lót-à-rai-mái

2- Your Stay in the Hotel

I want to check in. I already made a reservation.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันต้องการเช็คอิน จองห้องไว้แล้ว
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-dtâawng-gaan-chék-in jaawng-hâawng-wái-láaeo

There’s no Thai word for “check in.” Thai people use the same word as in English.

Your room is on ___ floor, number ___.

  • In Thai: ห้องพักของลูกค้าอยู่ชั้น ___ [floor number] ห้อง ___ [room number]
  • Pronunciation: hâawng-phák-khǎawng-lûuk-kháa-yùu-chán-___-hâawng-___

Here is a key and breakfast coupon.

  • In Thai: นี่คือกุญแจและคูปองอาหารเช้า
  • Pronunciation: nîi-khuue-gun-jaae-láe-khuu-bpaawng-aa-hǎan-cháo

I want to check out.

  • In Thai: ผม / ดิฉันต้องการเช็คเอาท์
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / dì-chǎn-dtâawng-gaan-chék-áo

There is no Thai word for “check out.” Thai people use the same word as in English.

I Want to Check Out

2- More Useful Phrases

Where should we meet?

  • In Thai: เราจะเจอกันที่ไหนดี
  • Pronunciation: rao-jà-jooe-gan-thîi-nǎi-dii

When should we meet?

  • In Thai: เราจะเจอกันกี่โมง
  • Pronunciation: rao-jà-jooe-gan-gìi-moong

I will pick ___ up from the ___ at ___.

  • In Thai: ผม / ฉันจะไปรับ ___ [person] ที่ ___ [place] ตอน ___ [time]
  • Pronunciation: phǒm / chǎn-jà-bpai-ráp-___-thîi-___-dtaawn-___

Thank you for this trip.

  • In Thai: ขอบคุณสำหรับทริปนี้
  • Pronunciation: khàawp-khun-sǎm-ràp-tríp-níi

7. Conclusion

How do you feel after going over all of these Thai business phrases? Are you more confident in your business communication skills? Let us know in the comments below.

If you want to learn more-specific terms, words, or phrases than the ones we covered here, check out our other lessons on ThaiPod101.com. Here are some lessons you may be interested in: 

Happy Thai learning, and good luck with your business endeavors!

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