ThaiPod101.com Blog
Learn Thai with Free Daily
Audio and Video Lessons!
Start Your Free Trial 6 FREE Features

Archive for the 'Thai Grammar' Category

How To Post In Perfect Thai on Social Media

Thumbnail

You’re learning to speak Thai, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Thai.

At Learn Thai, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Thai in the process.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai

1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Thai

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Thai. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Win eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down win’s post.

ไปทานอาหารญี่ปุ่นกับเพื่อนๆ (bpai thaan aa-hăan yîi-bpùn gàp phûuean phûuean)
“Having Japanese food with friends.”

1- ไปทานอาหารญี่ปุ่น (bpai thaan aa-hăan yîi-bpùn )

First is an expression meaning “Went to have Japanese food.”
In Thailand, Japanese food is very popular. Thai people are crazy about Japanese food, and because of this, it is common for new-generation Thais to eat out at Japanese restaurants in big shopping malls.

2- กับเพื่อนๆ (gàp phûuean phûuean)

Then comes the phrase - “With friends.”
The repetition of the word “friend” implies that there was more than one friend with him.

COMMENTS

In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

1- ไว้นัดกันอีกนะจ๊ะ (wái nát gan ìik ná já)

His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s meet again!”
Use this expression to show you are eager to repeat this meeting with friends.

2- วันนี้สนุกมากเลยเนอะ ^^ (wan-níi sà-nùk mâak looei nóe)

His girlfriend, fáa, uses an expression meaning - “Today was so fun.”
Use this expression to indicate you enjoyed the experience.

3- อาหารร้านนั้นอร่อยมากๆค่ะ (aa-hăan ráan nán a-ràauy mâak mâak khâ)

His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “The food there is very good.”
Use this expression to compliment the food.

4- ขอบใจที่ชวนมานะ เพื่อน (khàawp-jai thîi chuuan maa ná phûuean)

His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Thanks for asking me out, dude.”
Use this expression to show you are feeling grateful towards your friend for the invitation.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • อาหาร (aa-hăan): “food”
  • ญี่ปุ่น (yîi-bpùn): “Japan or Japanese”
  • นัด (nát): “make a meeting or appointment”
  • สนุก (sà-nùk): “have fun”
  • ร้าน (ráan): “shop, restaurant, store”
  • อร่อย (à-ràauy): “delicious”
  • ชวน (chuuan): “ask out or invite”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Thai restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Thai

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Thai phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    fáa shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    ชอบมาช้อปปิ้งกับพี่สาวที่สุดเลย! (châawp maa cháwp-bpîng gàp phîi-săao thîi-sùt looei)
    “I love shopping with my sister!”

    1- ชอบมาช้อปปิ้งที่สุดเลย (châawp maa cháwp-bpîng thîi-sùt looei)

    First is an expression meaning “I love to go shopping the most..”
    Thai people love shopping. Clothes and goods in Thailand are relatively cheap, while the quality and designs are quite good. Moreover, it’s normal to see people selling stuff everywhere in Thailand. For example, on the street, in a shopping mall, or at a flea market.

    2- กับพี่สาว (gàp phîi-săao)

    Then comes the phrase - “with my sister.”
    One characteristic of Thai people, especially girls, is that they love to have someone accompany them when they go out.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- อิจฉาจัง 555 (ìt-chăa jang hâa hâa hâa)

    Her high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Jealous. Lol.”
    Use this expression to indicate you’re envious of the poster’s experience, but not in a nasty way.

    2- ซื้อขนมมาฝากไอติมด้วย (súue khà-nŏm maa fàak ai-dtim dûuai)

    Her nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “Buy me some snacks!”
    Use this expression to make conversation by demanding something in a playful way.

    3- คนเยอะมั๊ย (khon yóe mái)

    Her college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Is it crowded?”
    Use this expression to show you are curious and would like to know more about the event.

    4- ตอนนี้ร้าน A ลดราคาอยู่นะจ๊ะ (dtaawn-níi ráan ee lót raa-khaa yùu ná já)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Check out the sale in Shop A”
    Use this expression when you have advice to give that could benefit the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • พี่สาว (phîi-săao): “older sister”
  • ช้อปปิ้ง (cháwp-bpîng): “shopping”
  • อิจฉา (ìt-chăa): “envy or jealous”
  • ขนม (khà-nŏm): “snacks”
  • เยอะ (yóe): “a lot, many or much”
  • ร้าน (ráan): “shop, restaurant, store”
  • ลดราคา (lót raa-khaa): “give a discount”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Thai

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunities for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Thai.

    win plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    มาเตะบอลที่ทะเล ดำเลย (maa dtè baawn thîi thá-lee dam looei)
    “Playing soccer by the sea. Now, I’m dark.”

    1- มาเตะบอลที่ทะเล (maa dtè baawn thîi thá-lee )

    First is an expression meaning “Playing soccer by the sea..”
    The most popular sport among Thai men is soccer.

    2- ดำเลย (dam looei)

    Then comes the phrase - “Now, Im dark..”
    Thailand has strong sunlight. So by going to the sea, even without sun-bathing yourself, you tend to get darker.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 555 (hâa hâa hâa)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “hahaha”
    Use this expression to show that you find the post humorous.

    2- หรอ? ;P (rǎaw)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Oh yeah? ;P”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and are in a teasing mood.

    3- มาเล่นกับไอติมบ้างสิ (maa lêen gàp ai-dtim bâang sì)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “Come and play with me too!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling playful and inviting.

    4- ดูน่าสนุกจังเลยค่ะ (duu nâa sà-nùk jang looei khâ)

    His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Looks fun.”
    Use this comment when the poster’s photo looks like a fun event.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • เตะบอล (dtè baawn): “play football”
  • ทะเล (thá-lee ): “sea”
  • ดำ (dam): “dark or black”
  • กับ (gàp ): “with”
  • เล่น (lêen): “play”
  • ดู (duu ): “look like, seem or deem”
  • น่าสนุก (nâa sà-nùk): “seem fun”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Thai

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    fáa shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    เพลงนี้โดนใจสุดๆ (phleeng níi doon-jai sùt sùt)
    “I’m so loving this song.”

    1- เพลงนี้ (phleeng níi )

    First is an expression meaning “This song.”
    Unlike in English, in Thai the word ‘this’ is placed after the noun, not in front of it.

    2- โดนใจสุดๆ (doon-jai sùt sùt)

    Then comes the phrase - “to my liking” or “super impressed”.
    This phrase literally means ‘maximum hit to the heart’. It is used when talking about things that you really like, mostly songs, movies and books. Sometimes we use it with people, but only when referring to a person of the opposite sex that you like in a romantic way.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ชอบเหมือนกัน (châawp mǔuean gan)

    Her boyfriend, win, uses an expression meaning - “I like it too.”
    Use this expression to show you agree with the poster.

    2- ชอบคนหรือชอบเพลงจ๊ะ ;P (châawp khon rǔue châawp phleeng já)

    Her high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Do you like the person or the song? ;P”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    3- ผมก็ชอบเพลงนี้ครับ (phŏm gâaw châawp phleeng níi khráp)

    Her supervisor, non, uses an expression meaning - “I like this song too.”
    This is the same as above, meaning you say that you like something, specifically the song.

    4- เพลงอะไรอะ ป้า -”- (phleeng à-rai à bpâa)

    Her nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “What song is this, Aunty? -”-”
    Use this expression to show you are curious about the name of the song.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • เพลง (phleeng ): “song”
  • นี้ (níi ): “this”
  • โดนใจ (doon-jai ): “to one’s liking”
  • ชอบ (châawp ): “like”
  • เหมือนกัน (mǔuean gan): “too”
  • คน (khon): “person or people”
  • อะไร (à-rai): “what”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Thai Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Thai!

    win goes to a concert, posts an image of himself at the concert, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    คอนเสิร์ตวันนี้มันส์มาก (khaawn-sòoet wan-níi man mâak)
    “Today’s concert was so fun.”

    1- คอนเสิร์ตวันนี้ (khaawn-sòoet wan-níi )

    First is an expression meaning “Today’s concert .”
    Going to concerts are one of the most popular activities that Thai people love to enjoy.

    2- มันส์มาก (man mâak)

    Then comes the phrase - “Was so much fun.”
    This word is often used in spoken language and on social media.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- คอนเสิร์ตใครน่ะ (khaawn-sòoet khrai nâ)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Whose concert was it?”
    Use this expression if you need more information.

    2- น่าสนุกจังเลยค่ะ :) (nâa sà-nùk jang looei khâ)

    His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Sounds fun.”
    Use this expression if you want to comment shortly but positively.

    3- สนุกมั๊ย อยากไปบ้าง (sà-nùk mái yàak bpai bâang)

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Was it fun? I wanna go too.”
    Use these phrases to show your interest in the topic, and express that you’d like to have the same experience.

    4- ไม่เคยชวนเลยนะ :( (mâi khooei chuuan looei ná)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “You never invited me!”
    Use this expression to show you feel a bit left out.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • คอนเสิร์ต (khaawn-sòoet ): “concert”
  • วันนี้ (wan-níi ): “today”
  • มันส์ (man): “so much fun”
  • ใคร (khrai): “who or whose”
  • สนุก (sà-nùk): “fun”
  • อยาก (yàak): “want”
  • ชวน (chuuan): “ask out or invite”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Thai

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Thai phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    fáa accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    ทำมือถือตกแตก T T (tham muue-thǔue dtòk dtàaek)
    “I dropped and broke my cell. ”

    1- มือถือ (muue-thǔue)

    First is an expression meaning “cell-phone.”
    Nowadays, everyone in Thailand has a cellphone, and they’re addicted to social networks.

    2- ทำ…ตกแตก (tham…dtòk dtàaek)

    Then comes the phrase - “drop and break it.”
    A phrase describing the action of dropping something and breaking it instantly.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ลองเอาไปให้ที่ศูนย์โทรศัพท์ดูนะ (laawng ao bpai hâi thîi sǔun thoo-rá-sàp duu ná)

    Her boyfriend, win, uses an expression meaning - “Take it to the phone center.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling determined.

    2- ใจเย็นๆนะคะ เดี๋ยวก็ซ่อมได้ (jai yen-yen ná khá dĭiao gâaw sâawm dâi)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Calm down. It’ll be fixed.”
    Use this expression to give advice and remind the poster that the issue is not such a big problem.

    3- โห สภาพน่ากลัวมาก (hŏo sà-phâap nâa-gluua mâak)

    Her college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “OMG. It looks horrible.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling shocked by something’s appearance. In this context, it’s also expressing a sort of sympathy.

    4- ถือว่าได้โอกาสเปลี่ยนเครื่องใหม่เลยไง (thǔue wâa dâi oo-gàat bplìian khrûueang mài looei ngai)

    Her high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Think of it as a way to switch to a new cell.”
    Use this expression to be funny and encouraging at the same time.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • มือถือ (muue-thǔue): “cellphone”
  • ตก (dtòk): “fall or drop “
  • ศูนย์โทรศัพท์ (sǔun thoo-rá-sàp): “phone center”
  • ซ่อม (sâawm): “repair or fix”
  • สภาพ (sà-phâap ): “condition”
  • น่ากลัว (nâa-gluua): “scary”
  • โอกาส (oo-gàat): “chance”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Thai. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Thai

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Thai!

    win gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    เบื่อจัง ไม่มีอะไรทำ (bùuea jang mâi mii à-rai tham)
    “I’m bored. There’s nothing to do.”

    1- เบื่อจัง (bùuea jang )

    First is an expression meaning “I’m bored. .”
    A phrase often used by Thais to express that they are bored. It’s used in spoken language and on social media.

    2- ไม่มีอะไรทำ (mâi mii à-rai tham)

    Then comes the phrase - “There’s nothing to do..”
    Thai people normally kill time by going out to meet friends, chilling at a cafe, and/or going to a movie theatre.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- เบื่อด้วย (bùuea dûuai)

    His girlfriend, fáa, uses an expression meaning - “I’m bored too.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling the same as the poster.

    2- 555 (hâa hâa hâa)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “lol”
    Use this expression to show that you think the post is funny. (lol stands for:”laugh out loud” )

    3- ออกไปข้างนอกกัน! (àawk bpai khâang nâawk gan)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s hang out!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling helpful to alleviate the poster’s boredom.

    4- ลองหาหนังสือมาอ่านดูสิ (laawng hăa năng-sǔue maa àan duu sì)

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Try finding a book to read.”
    This is another solution to the poster’s problem of boredom, so you’ll post this when you feel helpful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • เบื่อ (bùuea): “get bored”
  • ไม่มีอะไร (mâi mii à-rai): “nothing”
  • ด้วย (dûuai): “too or also”
  • ออกไป (àawk bpai ): “get out “
  • ข้างนอก (khâang nâawk): “outside”
  • หนังสือ (năng-sǔue ): “book”
  • อ่าน (àan): “read”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Thai

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Thai about your mood, and let your friends join in!

    fáa feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    ทำงานเหนื่อยจัง (tham ngaan nùueai jang)
    “I’m so tired from work.”

    1- ทำงาน (tham ngaan )

    First is an expression meaning “work..”
    Office workers in Bangkok normally work at least eight hours a day. Their lives are very hectic; that’s why they always feel tired from work. Moreover, women in Thailand tend to work rather than staying home and being a housewife.

    2- เหนื่อยจัง (nùueai jang)

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m so tired”.
    A frequently used expression on the Internet that people use to whine and complain about being tired.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ดูแลตัวเองด้วยนะคะ (duu-laae dtuua-eeng dûuai ná khá)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Please, take care of yourself.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and caring.

    2- ขอบคุณที่ตั้งใจทำงานนะครับ (khàawp-khun thîi dtâng-jai tham ngaan ná khráp)

    Her supervisor, non, uses an expression meaning - “Thank you for the hard work.”
    Use this phrase when you are feeling thankful.

    3- ไปเที่ยวกัน! (bpai thîiao gan)

    Her college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s go out and have fun!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and playful. It’s an invitation to go out.

    4- สู้ๆนะ (sûu-sûu ná)

    Her boyfriend, win, uses an expression meaning - “Fighting!”
    Use this expression when you want to tell someone to hold courage and not give up the fight.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ทำงาน (tham ngaan): “work”
  • เหนื่อย (nùueai): “be tired”
  • ดูแล (duu-laae ): “take care”
  • ตัวเอง (dtuua-eeng): “oneself”
  • ขอบคุณ (khàawp-khun): “thank you”
  • ไปเที่ยว (bpai thîiao ): “hang out, go out or travel”
  • กัน (gan): “let’s”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Thai! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Thai

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Thai.

    win suffers an injury, posts an image of himself in pain, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    โอ๊ย จะปวดอะไรนักหนา (óoi jà bpùuat à-rai nák năa)
    “Ouch! Why is it so painful?”

    1- โอ๊ย (óoi )

    First is an expression meaning “Ouch.”
    An interjection to express physical pain.

    2- จะปวดอะไรนักหนา (jà bpùuat à-rai nák năa)

    Then comes the phrase - “Why is it so painful?.”
    In Thailand, the first thing people do when they feel pain is to take a painkiller. These are sold everywhere, even at convenience stores.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- เป็นอะไรมั๊ยคะ (bpen à-rai mái khá)

    His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Are you ok?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    2- ปวดอะไร (bpùuat à-rai)

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “What pain?”
    Use this expression when you are trying to inject some humour into the situation.

    3- ปวดใจ? ;P (bpùuat jai)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Love pain? ;P”
    This phrase has the same purpose as the previous one - you’re trying to lighten up the conversation.

    4- เกิดอะไรขึ้นเนี่ย (gòoet à-rai khûen nîia)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “What’s happening here?”
    This is a question to extract more information from the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • โอ๊ย (óoi ): “Ouch”
  • ปวด (bpùuat ): “feel pain”
  • อะไร (à-rai ): “what”
  • นักหนา (nák năa): “so much”
  • ปวดใจ (bpùuat jai): “love pain”
  • เกิดขึ้น (gòoet khûen ): “happen”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Thai

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    fáa feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    เกลียดฝนตก เกลียดรถติด (glìiat fŏn dtòk glìiat rót dtìt)
    “Hate the rain. Hate traffic jams.”

    1- เกลียดฝนตก (glìiat fŏn dtòk )

    First is an expression meaning “Hate the rain. .”
    When it’s not the rainy season or an unusual occurrence, e.g. a typhoon, it seldom rains in Thailand.

    2- เกลียดรถติด (glìiat rót dtìt)

    Then comes the phrase - “Hate traffic jams..”
    When it rains, there’s a high potential for floods and massive traffic jams in big cities. That’s why Thai people always complain about the rain.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- เซ็งเหมือนกัน (seng mǔuean gan)

    Her college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “This sucks!”
    Use this expression to show you are agreeing with the poster.

    2- มาบริษัท ขับรถระวังๆนะครับ (maa baaw-rí-sàt khàp rót rá-wang rá-wang ná khráp)

    Her supervisor, non, uses an expression meaning - “Please be careful when you drive to the office today.”
    Use this expression to show concern, almost like a parent.

    3- ดูแลตัวเองด้วยนะ (duu laae dtuua eeng dûuai ná)

    Her boyfriend, win, uses an expression meaning - “Please take care of yourself.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    4- น่าจะตกไม่นานนะคะ (nâa jà dtòk mâi naan ná khá)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Maybe it won’t last long.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic that there may be relief ahead.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • เกลียด (glìiat ): “hate”
  • ฝนตก (fŏn dtòk ): “rain”
  • รถติด (rót dtìt): “traffic jam”
  • เซ็ง (seng): “get bored”
  • บริษัท (baaw-rí-sàt ): “company or office”
  • ขับรถ (khàp rót): “drive”
  • ระวัง (rá-wang): “be careful”
  • How would you comment in Thai when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Thai

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    win changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    ไม่โสดแล้วครับ (mâi sòot láaeo khráp)
    “I’m not single anymore.”

    1- ไม่โสดแล้ว (mâi sòot láaeo)

    First is an expression meaning “I’m not single anymore”.
    When Thai people change their relationship status from single to in-a-relationship, friends will often post to either congratulate or tease them.

    2- ครับ (khráp)

    Then comes the phrase which is a particle for guys.
    This is the ending particle for men to indicate formality. However, on social media, it is normally used in a joking manner, like ’sir’ or ‘madam’ in English, which people sometimes use to tease others.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ยินดีด้วย! (yin dii dûuai )

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    Use this expression to give congratulations.

    2- ในที่สุดก็เปิดตัวนะ ;P (nai thîi sùt gâaw bpòoet-dtuua ná)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Finally, you go public ;P”
    Use this expression to show you are in a fun mood, and want to tease the poster a bit.

    3- ดีใจด้วยนะคะ (dii jai dûuai ná khá)

    His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Happy for you”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and happy about the event.

    4- แต่งเมื่อไหร่บอกด้วยนะ อิอิ (dtàaeng mûuea rài bàawk dûuai ná ì-ì)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “When you get married, please let me know. lol.”
    Use this expression to be funny and also a bit teasing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • โสด (sòot): “single”
  • ยินดีด้วย (yin dii dûuai ): “congratulations”
  • ในที่สุด (nai thîi sùt): “eventually, finally”
  • เปิดตัว (bpòoet-dtuua): “officially go public, debut, launch”
  • ดีใจ (dii jai): “glad or happy”
  • แต่ง (dtàaeng): “get married (shortened word)”
  • เมื่อไหร่ (mûuea rài ): “when”
  • What would you say in Thai when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Thai

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Thai.

    fáa is getting married today, so she leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    วันที่มีความสุขที่สุดในชีวิต (wan thîi mii khwaam sùk thîi sùt nai chii-wít)
    “Happiest day of my life.”

    1- วันที่มีความสุขที่สุด (wan thîi mii khwaam sùk thîi sùt )

    First is an expression meaning “Happiest day .”
    For Thai women, weddings are very important. Some regard their wedding day as the most special day of their lives. Nowadays, weddings are usually held in big hotels, arranged in Thai-Western style, where the first half of the day, the bride and groom wear traditional Thai clothing, and the second half, the woman wears a white, Western-style bridal gown. Some aspects of Western wedding culture have been adopted in Thailand, such as bouquet tossing and cake-cutting, but many aspects of original Thai culture have been preserved as well.

    2- ในชีวิต (nai chii-wít)

    Then comes the phrase - “of my life.”
    This word is used to emphasize the importance of the wedding.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ยินดีด้วยนะครับ (yin dii dûuai ná khráp)

    Her supervisor, non, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations”
    This is the traditional way of congratulating someone.

    2- วันนี้สวยสุดๆเลยนะจ๊ะ (wan-níi sŭuai sùt sùt looei ná já)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Today, you’re very beautiful.”
    Use this expression to show you want to compliment the poster on their appearance.

    3- ดีใจกับฟ้าด้วยน้า (dii jai gàp fáa dûuai náa)

    Her high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Happy for you.”
    Use this expression to show you’re feeling pleased and happy for the poster.

    4- มีความสุขเหมือนกันครับ (mii khwaam-sùk mǔuean-gan khráp)

    Her husband, win, uses an expression meaning - “I’m also very happy.”
    Use this expression to share that you are sharing the poster’s feelings.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • วัน (wan): “day”
  • ชีวิต (chii-wít): “life”
  • ความสุข (khwaam sùk ): “happiness”
  • ที่สุด (thîi sùt): “the most”
  • สวย (sŭuai): “pretty, beautiful”
  • สุดๆ (sùt sùt): “very, extremely”
  • เหมือนกัน (mǔuean-gan): “same/too/also”
  • How would you respond in Thai to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Thai

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Thai.

    win finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    ครอบครัวเราจะมีสมาชิกใหม่เพิ่มแล้วนะ (khrâawp-khruua rao jà mii sà-maa-chík mài phôoem láaeo ná)
    “Our family will have a new member soon.”

    1- ครอบครัวเรา (khrâawp-khruua rao)

    First is an expression meaning “Our family .”
    Typical Thai families are large, with as many as 6 to 10 members. However, the new generation of Thais prefer to live on their own and often have smaller families.

    2- จะมีสมาชิกใหม่เพิ่มแล้วนะ (jà mii sà-maa-chík mài phôoem láaeo ná)

    Then comes the phrase - “will have a new member soon..”
    Having a new member, in this case a baby, is always a good event. Family and friends will normally visit the couple and new-born baby at the hospital, bringing gifts.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- จะมีน้องแล้วหรอ (jà mii náawng láaeo rǎaw)

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Are you having a baby?”
    This is a rhetorical question to make conversation.

    2- เห้ย ดีใจด้วย (hôoei dii-jai dûuai)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “OMG! Congrats!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling happy and surprised about the good news at the same time.

    3- มีอะไรให้ช่วยบอกได้นะคะ (mii à-rai hâi chûuai bàawk dâi ná khá)

    His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “If you need anything, please let me know.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling supportive and want to help, if needed.

    4- อยากเล่นกับน้องแล้ว (yàak lêen gàp náawng láaeo)

    His nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “I wanna play with your baby!”
    Use this expression to be humorous and show your caring at the same time.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ครอบครัว (khrâawp-khruua): “family”
  • สมาชิก ( sà-maa-chík): “members”
  • ใหม่ (mài): “new”
  • เพิ่ม (phôoem): “more, additional”
  • ช่วย (chûuai): “help”
  • เล่น (lêen): “play”
  • น้อง (náawng): “little brother or sister (in this case, it refers to the baby)”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Thai Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Thai.

    fáa plays with her baby, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    ลูกแม่น่ารักที่สุด (lûuk mâae nâa-rák thîi-sùt)
    “My baby is the cutest.”

    1- ลูกแม่ (lûuk mâae )

    First is an expression meaning “My baby.”
    Thai people love to softly pinch a baby’s cheeks if they think the baby is cute. However, if you aren’t close with the parents, you should ask them first if it is okay to touch their child.

    2- น่ารักที่สุด (nâa-rák thîi-sùt)

    Then comes the phrase - ” is the cutest..”
    In Thailand, there’s an old belief that one should not call a new-born baby ‘cute’, because a ghost will come and steal the baby away. So some people prefer to use the word ‘ugly’ or ‘malicious’ instead of the word ‘cute’ to prevent the ghost from coming after their babies. However, this belief is often associated with older generations, and is becoming more and more rare.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- น่ารักมากเลยค่ะ (nâa-rák mâak looei khâ)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “So cute.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted and appreciative of the young one.

    2- อยากหยิกแก้ม (yàak yìk gâaem)

    Her high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Wanna pinch his/her cheek.”
    Use this expression to show your eagerness to meet the new baby.

    3- อยากไปเล่นด้วย (yàak bpai lêen dûuai)

    Her nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “I want to play with him/her.”
    Use this expression to show you feel positive about and are keen to play with the baby.

    4- น้องน่าชังมากเลยครับ (náawng nâa chang mâak looei khráp)

    Her supervisor, non, uses an expression meaning - “He/she is malicious. (which means cute in this context)”
    Use this expression to be old fashioned.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ลูก (lûuk): “baby”
  • แม่ (mâae): “mom”
  • น่ารัก (nâa-rák): “cute”
  • หยิก (yìk): “pinch”
  • แก้ม (gâaem): “cheek”
  • อยาก (yàak): “want”
  • น่าชัง (nâa chang): “malicious”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Thai! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Thai Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    win goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    นานๆจะพร้อมหน้าพร้อมตากัน (naan-naan jà phráawm nâa phráawm dtaa gan)
    “Been a while since everyone has been all together.”

    1- นานๆจะ (naan-naan jà )

    First is an expression meaning “Been a while that.”
    Since the new generation of Thai families don’t live with their parents anymore, for some families, it’s rare that they have a big gathering. They may only come together for very special events.

    2- พร้อมหน้าพร้อมตากัน (phráawm nâa phráawm dtaa gan)

    Then comes the phrase - “everyone has been all together.”
    When there’s a family gathering, it’s normally held in the house of the oldest people in the family, usually the grandparents. Everyone helps by either bringing food or cooking the meal together.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ฝากสวัสดีคุณพ่อ คุณแม่ ด้วยนะ (fàak sà-wàt-dii khun phâaw khun mâae dûuai ná)

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Please send my regards to your parents.”
    Use this expression to send greetings to the poster’s parents.

    2- ครอบครัวนายใหญ่มาก (khrâawp-khruua naai yài mâak)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “You have a big fam.”
    Use this observation to partake in the conversation if the poster’s family is big.

    3- ครอบครัวน่ารักมากเลยค่ะ (khrâawp-khruua nâa-rák mâak looei khâ)

    His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Your family is very cute.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    4- ไอติมหน้าตาตลกอ่ะ รูปนี้ (ai-dtim nâa-dtaa dtà-lòk à rûup níi)

    His nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “I look so weird in this pic.”
    Use this expression to comment on your own appearance.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • พร้อมหน้าพร้อมตา (phráawm nâa phráawm dtaa): “all present or all together”
  • สวัสดี (sà-wàt-dii): “hello, hi, regard”
  • คุณพ่อ (khun phâaw): “father”
  • คุุณแม่ (khun mâae): “mother”
  • ใหญ่ (yài): “big”
  • น่ารัก (nâa-rák): “cute”
  • ตลก (dtà-lòk): “funny”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Thai

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Thai about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    fáa waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    รอบินอีก 1 ชม. (raaw bin ìik nùeng chûua-moong)
    ” Waiting to fly off in 1 hour.”

    1- รอบิน (raaw bin )

    First is an expression meaning “Waiting to fly off.”
    If you’re flying out of Bangkok, there are two international airports you can use - Suvarnabhumi Airport or Don mueang Airport.

    2- อีก 1 ชม. (ìik nùeng chûua-moong)

    Then comes the phrase - ” in 1 hour”.
    Thai people love to shop in the duty-free stores while they wait for their flight.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ไปไหนหรอ (bpai năi rǎaw)

    Her college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Where are you going?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous.

    2- เดินทางดีๆนะคะ (dooen thaang dii dii ná khá)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Have a safe flight”.
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    3- อย่าลืมของฝากนะ (yàa luuem khǎawng-fàak ná)

    Her nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t forget my souvenir.”
    Use this phrase to tease the poster a bit by requesting a gift.

    4- ขอไปด้วย 555 (khǎaw bpai dûuai hâa hâa hâa)

    Her high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Can I go with you? lol”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • รอ (raaw): “wait”
  • บิน (bin ): “fly or fly off”
  • ชม. (chûua-moong): “hr (abbreviation of hour)”
  • เดินทาง (dooen thaang): “travel”
  • ลืม (luuem): “forget”
  • ของฝาก (khǎawng-fàak): “souvenir”
  • ไป (bpai): “go”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Thai!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Thai

    So maybe you’re strolling around at your local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Thai phrases!

    win finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    เจอของหน้าตาแปลกๆเข้าแล้ว (jooe khǎawng nâa-dtaa bplàaek bplàaek khâo láaeo)

    “Found exotic stuff.”

    1- เจอ…เข้าแล้ว (jooe…khâo láaeo)

    First is an expression meaning “found”.
    We use this verb to emphasize the thing we coincidentally found.

    2- ของหน้าตาแปลกๆ (khǎawng nâa-dtaa bplàaek bplàaek )

    Then comes the phrase - “exotic stuff!”
    Thai people love taking photos. When they find or see exotic things, they normally take photos and post them on social media.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- มันคืออะไรอะ (man khuue à-rai à)

    His nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “What is it?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling cynical.

    2- ดูเหมือนของเก่าที่มีราคาเลยครับ (duu mǔuean khǎawng gào thîi mii raa-khaa looei khráp)

    His supervisor, non, uses an expression meaning - “Looks like a valuable antique”.
    Use this expression to share your opinion.

    3- ชอบของแปลกหรอ 555 (châawp khǎawng bplàaek rǎaw hâa hâa hâa)

    His wife’s high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “So you like weird stuff? lol”
    Use this expression to be funny and teasing.

    4- แปลกแต่ดูเก๋ดีนะ (bplàaek dtàae duu gěe dii ná)

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Exotic, but looks so cool.”
    Use this expression to share your opinion.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • เจอ (jooe): “found”
  • ของ (khǎawng): “thing, stuff”
  • หน้าตา (nâa dtaa): “appearance”
  • แปลก (bplàaek): “strange, weird, exotic”
  • ของเก่า (khǎawng gào): “antique”
  • มีราคา (mii raa-khaa): “valuable, marketable”
  • เก๋ (gěe): “chic, cool”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Thai

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Thai, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    fáa visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    มาเปิดหู เปิดตา ในที่ใหม่ๆ (maa bpòoet hǔu bpòoet dtaa nai thîi mài mài)
    “Having an eye-opening experience in a new place.”

    1- มาเปิดหู เปิดตา (maa bpòoet hǔu bpòoet dtaa )

    First is an expression meaning “Having an eye-opening experience .”
    This is a proverb, literally meaning ‘open eyes, open ears’. It’s similar to ‘eye-opening’ in English.

    2- ในที่ใหม่ๆ (nai thîi mài mài)

    Then comes the phrase - “in a new place..”
    Thai people love to take vacations and go abroad or travel to somewhere far away in order to gain new eye-opening experiences.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- โห ดูสวยมาก (hŏo duu sŭuai mâak)

    Her husband’s high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Wow, it looks so beautiful.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling appreciative of the photo the poster has shared.

    2- ที่นี่ที่ไหนอ่ะ (thîi-nîi thîi-năi à)

    Her college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Where is this?”
    Use this expression if you want more information about a location.

    3- ผมเคยไปมาเมื่อปีที่แล้ว (phŏm khooei bpai maa mûuea bpii thîi láaeo)

    Her supervisor, non, uses an expression meaning - “I was there last year.”
    Use this expression to share a personal detail.

    4- อยากไปมั่งเลยค่ะ (yàak bpai mâng looei khâ)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “I really want to go there.”
    Use this expression to share your wanting to go somewhere.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • เปิดหู เปิดตา (bpòoet hǔu bpòoet dtaa): “eye-opening”
  • ที่ (thîi): “place”
  • ใหม่ๆ (mài mài): “new”
  • ที่นี่ (thîi-nîi): “here”
  • ที่ไหน (thîi-năi): “where”
  • เคย (khooei ): “ever, used to”
  • ปีที่แล้ว (bpii thîi láaeo): “last year”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Thai

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Thai!

    win relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    นอนพักผ่อนบนชายหาด (naawn phák-phàawn bon chaai-hàat)
    “Relaxing on the beach.”

    1- นอนพักผ่อน (naawn phák-phàawn )

    First is an expression meaning “Relaxing.”
    Thai people love taking vacations. When there’s a long vacation, people normally go on a trip, either abroad or to another province of Thailand.

    2- บนชายหาด (bon chaai-hàat)

    Then comes the phrase - “on the beach..”
    The beach is one of the most popular places to go during a long vacation. There are a lot of beautiful beaches in Thailand, such as Pattaya and Huahin.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ชิวมากเลยนะเพื่อน (chiu mâak looei ná phûuean)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “You look so chillax.”
    Use this expression when you’re in a playful mood.

    2- ดูเงียบสงบมากเลย (duu ngîiap sà-ngòp mâak looei)

    His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “It looks so calm and peaceful.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling positive about the poster’s photo.

    3- ทริปในฝันเลยนะเนี่ย (thríp nai făn looei ná nîia)

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “This is my dream trip.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling very appreciative of their trip.

    4- กลับมาเร็วๆ (glàp maa reo reo)

    His nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “Please come back soon. ”
    Use this expression to show you are missing the poster and want them to return to you soon.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • นอน (naawn): “sleep, take a nap”
  • พักผ่อน (phák-phàawn): “relax, rest”
  • ชายหาด (chaai-hàat): “beach”
  • ชิว (chiu): “chillax, look so chill”
  • เงียบ (ngîiap): “quiet”
  • สงบ (sà-ngòp): “calm, peaceful”
  • ฝัน (făn): “dream”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Thai When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    fáa returns home after a vacation, posts an image of the family at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    กลับมาแล้วจ้า (glàp maa láaeo jâa)
    “Back in town.”

    1- กลับมาแล้ว (glàp maa láaeo)

    First is an expression meaning “Back in town..”
    Thai people usually bring souvenirs back after a trip to give to their co-workers, friends and family.

    2- จ้า (jâa)

    Then comes the phrase - “(particle).”
    The most common souvenirs are food and candies, which can easily be shared with many people.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ไปเที่ยวสนุกมั๊ย (bpai thîiao sà-nùk mái)

    Her high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Did you have fun?”
    Use this expression to show your interest in the poster’s holiday.

    2- พักผ่อนเยอะๆค่ะ (phák-phàawn yóe yóe khâ)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Please get a good rest.”
    Use this expression to show concern that the poster might be tired and need rest.

    3- ได้ซื้อของฝากมาให้รึเปล่า (dâai súue khǎawng-fàak maa hâi rúe bplàao)

    Her nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “Have you brought any souvenirs for me?”
    Use this expression when you’re in a humorous, playful mood.

    4- ยินดีต้อนรับกลับบ้านจ้า (yin-dii dtâawn-ráp glàp bâan jâa)

    Her husband’s high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back!”
    This is the traditional salutation when someone returns from somewhere.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • กลับมา (glàp maa): “come back”
  • เที่ยว (thîiao): “travel, go on a trip”
  • สนุก (sà-nùk): “enjoy”
  • พักผ่อน (phák-phàawn): “relax, rest”
  • ซื้อ (súue): “buy”
  • ยินดีต้อนรับ (yin-dii dtâawn-ráp): “welcome”
  • บ้าน (bâan): “home”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as Songrkan Day?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Thai

    It’s a public holiday too, and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    win wants to celebrate Songkran Day somewhere special, so he leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    ไปเล่นน้ำที่ไหนดีในวันสงกรานต์ (bpai lêen nám thîi-năi dii nai wan sŏng-graan)
    “Where should I go on Songkran Day?”

    1- ไปเล่นน้ำที่ไหนดี (bpai lêen nám thîi-năi dii)

    First is an expression meaning “Where should I go (to splash water).”
    Songkran is known in English as the water-splashing festival. During this festival, people splash water at each other all over Thailand. Hence, if you don’t want to get wet, it’s better to stay at home. There are a few famous places to enjoy this festival. One of them is Khao-saan road, where Thais and foreigners enjoy splashing water on each other throughout the day and night.

    2- ในวันสงกรานต์ (nai wan sŏng-graan)

    Then comes the phrase - “on (the) Songkran Day?.”
    Songkran is the Thai New Year, which lasts for three days between 13-15 of April. It’s a national holiday, so there is no school or work during that time.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ไปข้าวสารกันเถอะ (bpai khâao-săan gan thòe)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s go to Khao San Road.”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion for a destination.

    2- ร้อนมากอ่ะวันนี้ (ráawn mâak à wan níi)

    His wife’s high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Today’s burning hot.”
    Use this expression to comment on the weather.

    3- ถ้าออกไปข้างนอกก็ระวังตัวด้วยนะคะ (thâa àawk bpai khâang-nâawk gâaw rá-wang dtuua dûuai ná khá)

    His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “If you’re going out, please take care.”
    Use this expression to show your concern for the poster’s wellbeing.

    4- ไปด้วย! (bpai dûuai)

    His nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “I wanna go too!”
    Use this expression if you want to join the poster on the outing.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • เล่น (lêen): “play”
  • น้ำ (nám): “water”
  • ร้อน (ráawn): “hot”
  • มาก (mâak): “very”
  • ออกไป (àawk bpai): “go out”
  • ข้างนอก (khâang-nâawk): “outside”
  • ระวังตัว (rá-wang dtuua): “be careful”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Thai New Year, or Songkran Day, and other public holidays days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Thai

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    fáa goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    แก่ขึ้นอีกปี (gàae khûen ìik bpii)
    “A year older.”

    1- แก่ขึ้น (gàae khûen )

    First is an expression meaning “older..”
    Thai people love to celebrate their birthday with their friends and family. Some organize a small birthday party, while others go to the temple and make contributions.

    2- อีกปี (ìik bpii)

    Then comes the phrase - “A year .”
    In Thailand, it’s traditional to go to your local temple on your birthday to make a contribution and get blessed by a monk. Some people donate items and money to NGOs instead, as a way to give back and be blessed for the coming year.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- แฮปปี้เบิร์ดเดย์จ้า (hâep-bpîi-bóoet-dee jâa)

    Her husband’s high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday (in English).”
    This is the traditional birthday wish as it would be phrased in English.

    2- สุขสันต์วันเกิดครับ (sùk-săn wan gòoet khráp)

    Her husband, win, uses an expression meaning - “Wish you a happy birthday (in Thai).”
    This is the traditional birthday phrased in Thai.

    3- ขอให้มีความสุขนะจ๊ะ (khǎaw hâi mii khwaam-sùk ná já)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Wish you happiness.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    4- ขอให้สวยวันสวยคืน 555 (khǎaw hâi sŭuai wan sŭuai khuuen hâa hâa hâa)

    Her high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Wish you get prettier as time goes by. lol”
    Use this expression to wish the poster beauty with increasing age.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • แก่ขึ้น (gàae khûen): “getting older”
  • อีก (ìik): “another”
  • ปี (bpii): “year”
  • สุขสันต์วันเกิด (sùk-săn wan gòoet): “Happy birthday”
  • วันเกิด (wan gòoet): “birthday”
  • ขอให้ (khǎaw hâi): “wish or hope”
  • สวยวัน สวยคืน (sŭuai wan sŭuai khuuen): “getting prettier (proverb)”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Thai

    Impress your friends with your Thai New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    win celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    สุขสันต์วันปีใหม่ (sùk-săn wan bpii-mài)
    “Happy New Year.”

    1- สุขสันต์ (sùk-săn )

    First is an expression meaning “Happy .”
    Activities that people normally do on New Year include visiting family and friends and exchanging gifts and New Year’s cards. It’s believed to be a blissful day, because you can forget all of the bad things that happened over the past year and begin again in the new one!

    2- วันปีใหม่ (wan bpii-mài)

    Then comes the phrase - “New Year..”
    Thai people celebrate the New Year on the first of January, like the rest of the world. There is no school or work on New Year, but shops typically stay open.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ขอให้เป็นอีกปีที่ดีของเรานะ (khǎaw hâi bpen ìik bpii thîi dii khǎawng rao ná)

    His wife, fáa, uses an expression meaning - “Wish it’s another good year for us.”
    Use this expression to wish someone a positive new year.

    2- ขอให้มีความสุขตลอดปีนะครับ (khǎaw hâi mii khwaam-sùk dtà-làawt bpii ná khráp)

    His supervisor, non, uses an expression meaning - “Wish you happiness throughout the year.”
    This is another way to wish someone well for the new year.

    3- มีของขวัญมาให้ไอติมมั๊ย (mii khǎawng-khwăn maa hâi ai-dtim mái)

    His nephew, ai-dtim, uses an expression meaning - “Do you have any presents for me?”
    Use this expression if you are feeling humorous and a bit teasing.

    4- ขอให้เป็นอีกปีที่ดีสำหรับวินนะ (khǎaw hâi bpen ìik bpii thîi dii săm-ràp win ná)

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Wish you another wonderful year.”
    Yet another way to wish someone a good new year.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • สุขสันต์วันปีใหม่ (sùk-săn wan bpii-mài): “happy new year”
  • สุขสันต์ (sùk-săn): “happy”
  • วันปีใหม่ (wan bpii-mài): “New year”
  • ตลอด (dtà-làawt): “throughout”
  • ความสุข (khwaam-sùk): “happiness”
  • ของขวัญ (khǎawng-khwăn): “present or gift”
  • สำหรับ (săm-ràp): “for”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Thai

    What will you say in Thai about Christmas?

    fáa celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down fáa’s post.

    สุขสันต์วันคริสต์มาสนะทุกคน (sùk-săn wan khrít-mâat ná thúk khon)
    “Merry X’mas everyone.”

    1- สุขสันต์วันคริสต์มาสนะ (sùk-săn wan khrít-mâat ná)

    First is an expression meaning “Merry X’mas .”
    Christmas is indeed an important day for Thai Christians. Even though Buddhism is Thailand’s state religion, you will still see Christmas decorations and Christmas trees, mainly in shopping malls and hotels. These are prepared both as a commercial exercise and as part of the Thai spirit of fun.

    2- ทุกคน (thúk khon)

    Then comes the phrase - “everyone..”
    Thai people celebrate Christmas by having a Christmas party with their friends and co-workers. Activities include things like gift raffles and gift exchanges. However, note that it is not a national holiday, so people still have to go to school and work during the day.

    COMMENTS

    In response, fáa’s friends leave some comments.

    1- วันคริสต์มาส แต่ยังทำงานอยู่เลย (wan khrít-mâat dtàae yang tham ngaan yùu looei)

    Her husband, win, uses an expression meaning - “It’s Christmas day, but I’m still at work.”
    Use this expression if you have to work on Christmas day.

    2- แต่ยังร้อนอยู่เลย (dtàae yang ráawn yùu looei)

    Her high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “But it’s still freaking hot.”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    3- ไปเที่ยวกันมั๊ย คืนนี้ (bpai thîiao gan mái khuuen níi)

    Her college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Wanna hang out tonight?”
    This is an invitation to get together in the evening.

    4- เมอร์รี่ คริสมาส นะจ๊ะ (mooe-rîi khrít-mâat ná já)

    Her neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas.”
    This is the traditional Christmas wish.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • สุขสันต์วันคริสต์มาส (sùk-săn wan khrít-mâat): “Merry Christmas”
  • วันคริสต์มาส (wan khrít-mâat): “Christmas day”
  • ทุกคน (thúk khon): “everybody”
  • ทำงาน (tham-ngaan): “work”
  • ยัง (yang): “still”
  • ร้อน (ráawn): “hot”
  • คืนนี้ (khuuen-níi): “tonight”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Thai

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Thai phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    win celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of them together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down win’s post.

    ครบรอบวันแต่งงาน 1 ปี (khróp-râawp wan dtàaeng-ngaan nùeng bpii)
    “1 year wedding anniversary.”

    1- ครบรอบวันแต่งงาน (khróp-râawp wan dtàaeng-ngaan)

    First is an expression meaning “wedding anniversary.”
    Recently, Thai people have begun to place more importance on their wedding anniversaries. We often see people post the celebration on social media.

    2- 1 ปี ( nùeng bpii)

    Then comes the phrase - “1 year.”
    On this day, men normally take their wives out to have a nice dinner or give them a special present.

    COMMENTS

    In response, win’s friends leave some comments.

    1- ยินดีด้วยนะคะ (yin dii dûuai ná khá)

    His neighbor, phraae, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is the traditional way to offer congratulations on a special day.

    2- 1 ปีแล้วหรอเนี่ย (nùeng bpii láaeo rǎaw nîia)

    His college friend, em, uses an expression meaning - “Is it 1 year already?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and want to joke around a bit.

    3- ขอให้รักกันไปนานๆนะ (khǎaw hâi rák gan bpai naan naan ná)

    His high school friend, maai, uses an expression meaning - “Wishing (that) you love each other for a long time.”
    Use this phrase if you want to offer the couple a positive wish for the future of their marriage.

    4- ไปฉลองกันที่ไหนเอ่ย (bpai chà-lǎawng gan thîi năi òoei)

    His wife’s high school friend, nám phŏn, uses an expression meaning - “Where are you going to celebrate?”
    Use this question if you’d like more information about the couple’s plans for the event.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • ครบรอบ (khróp râawp): “anniversary”
  • วันแต่งงาน (wan dtàaeng-ngaan): “wedding day”
  • ปี (bpii): “year”
  • รัก (rák): “love”
  • นานๆ (naan naan): “long time”
  • ฉลอง (chà-lǎawng): “celebrate”
  • ที่ไหน (thîi-năi): “where”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Thai! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai

    Best Guide on How to Say Sorry in the Thai Language

    When you do something wrong, you apologize. When you accidentally hurt someone, you say sorry. When you want to get a waitress’ attention, you say “Excuse me.” When you see someone who’s feeling sad because of a bad situation they face, you say you’re sorry for them.

    “Sorry” is one of the basic words you use in daily life and is one of the first words you learn when you start learning any language. And this article will teach you how to say sorry in Thai (because to learn sorry when living in Thailand would be tough!).

    How do I say sorry in Thai? Well, this topic is easy. In Thai, when you want to show your empathy, give your condolences, or show that you feel bad or sorry for what you did, there are a few words Thai people use which will be explained below. Also, to help you say “I’m sorry” in Thai like a native, ThaiPod101.com will also show you various phrases you can use in numerous situations you may face, including “sorry” from Thai to English. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Thai Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

    1. The Most Important Apologizing Word
    2. Phrases for Sorry in Thai
    3. Phrases for Condolences in Thai
    4. Sentences to Use with “Sorry”
    5. Reply Phrases for When Someone Says Sorry to You
    6. Tips on How to Say Sorry in Thai
    7. Conclusion

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai


    1. The Most Important Apologizing Word

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    As mentioned above, there are only a few words used for apologies in Thai. First, Thaipod101.com will teach you the words you need to know in order to say “I’m sorry” in Thai. ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) means “sorry,” “apology,” and “excuse me” in Thai. ขออภัย (khǎaw à-phai) has similar meanings, which are “sorry” and “apology” in Thai.

    The way to use these two words is slightly different; we’ll explain this below. Another word you should know is เสียใจ (sǐia-jai) which is used to show your condolences in Thai.

    1- How Do You Say Sorry in Thai?

    Now, for the most important part of this lesson: How to say “I am sorry” in Thai. Here, we’ll also show you some examples of “sorry” in Thai written in English.

    For spoken language, the main word used to say sorry, apology, or excuse me in Thai is as follows:

    ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) — “Sorry” in Thai translates to this word, and this is the main word for “sorry” in Thailand. You can use this word in every situation, both formal and informal. Make sure you remember this word well.

    โทดที (thôot thii) — This is a slang word for “sorry” in Thai. It’s an informal word so you should use this with friends or other people you’re close with. Don’t use this in business situations since it’s too casual.

    ซอรี่ (saaw-rîi) — This is another slang word for “sorry” in Thai. As you can guess, this is an informal way to say sorry, so only use this word with friends or other people you’re close with. Actually, this word is “sorry” in Thai pronunciation. To put it simply, Thai people just say sorry in English when using this word.

    Examples

    • When you accidentally step on someone’s foot, you can say ขอโทษค่ะ (khǎaw-thôot khâ) meaning “sorry” to apologize.
    • When you want to go to another part of the room but your group of friends is blocking your way, you can tell them โทดที ขอเดินหน่อย (thôot thii khǎaw dooen nàauy) which means, “Excuse me, I want to get through.”
    • When your sister finds out that you ate her chocolate cake, you can say ซอรี่ (saaw-rîi) meaning “sorry” to her.

    2- How Do You Write “Sorry” in Thai?

    For written language, these are the words and phrase Thai people use:

    ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) — As mentioned before, this is the main word for “sorry.” Thus, it’s used in written language as well. It can be used for both formal and informal documents.

    ขออภัย (khǎaw à-phai) — The difference between ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) and ขออภัย (khǎaw à-phai) is that ขออภัย (khǎaw à-phai) is mainly used in written language and rarely used in spoken language. It’s a formal language for apologies in Thailand. Another phrase that’s used is ขออภัยเป็นอย่างสูง (khǎaw à-phai bpen yàang sǔung) which means “very sorry” in Thai written language.

    ขอโทด (khǎaw-thôot) — This is a slang word in written language. The reason Thai people use this a lot is that it’s easier to type. The pronunciation of ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) and ขอโทด (khǎaw-thôot) is the same.

    โทดที (thôot thii) — This is a slang word for both written and spoken language, and gives a more informal feeling than ขอโทด (khǎaw-thôot) does.

    Example

    • You sent your report to your boss later than the deadline, so in the email you write ขอโทษครับ (khǎaw-thôot khráp) to apologize for your lateness.
    • The toilet in the department store is now being fixed. To ask customers to use the toilet on the third floor instead and apologize for inconvenience, they put a label that reads ขออภัยในความไม่สะดวก กรุณาไปใช้ห้องน้ำที่ชั้น 3 แทน (khǎaw à-phai nai kwaam mâi sà-dùuak gà-rú-naa bpai chái hâawng nám thîi chán săam thaaen).
    • You forgot to buy the book your friend asked you to buy for them today, so you text her that you’re sorry you forgot and that you’ll buy it for her tomorrow instead: โทดที เราลืมซื้อหนังสือให้ จะซื้อให้พรุ่งนี้แทนนะ (thôot thii rao luuem súue năng-sǔue hâi · jà súue hâi phrûng-níi thaaen ná). In this case, you can use ขอโทด (khǎaw-thôot) instead of โทดที (thôot thii) as well.

    3- Body Language

    Apart from spoken and written language, you should also know how Thai people act when they want to convey that they’re sorry. Here’s some body language to use when you want to convey “I’m sorry” in Thailand.

    ไหว้ (wâi) — In addition to greeting, Thai people also ไหว้ (wâi) when saying ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) to older people. To ไหว้ (wâi), you put your hands together at chest level and bend down your head until the tip of your nose touches your thumb.

    Sincere and polite tone of voice — When saying sorry, Thai people use a sincere and polite tone of voice. If your tone of voice is disrespectful or too annoying, it indicates that you’re not really sorry for what you did.

    Now that you essentially understand how to say sorry in Thai language, let’s delve a little deeper and learn some useful phrases.


    2. Phrases for Sorry in Thai

    Say Sorry

    In Thai, you can use ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) in every situation. However, sometimes you may want to be more specific to the situation. In that case, you should know how to say sorry to a Thai girl, how to say “Sorry I am late” in Thai, and how to say “Excuse me” in Thai language. So ThaiPod101.com presents you with sorry quotes in Thai that you can use in various situations.

    1- ขอโทษมาก ๆ

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot mâak mâak
    • Meaning: “I’m very sorry.”
    • Example: ขอโทษมาก ๆ ที่ทำหนังสือเธอเปียก.
      • Khǎaw-thôot mâak mâak thîi tham năng-sǔue thooe bpìiak.
      • “I’m very sorry for wetting your book.”

    2- ขอโทษจริง ๆ

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot jing-jing
    • Meaning: “I’m really sorry.”
    • Example: ขอโทษจริง ๆ ที่ลืมนัดของเรา.
      • Khǎaw-thôot jing jing thîi luuem nát khǎawng rao.
      • “I’m really sorry I forgot our appointment.”

    3- ขอโทษ เป็นอะไรมั๊ย / ขอโทษ เป็นอะไรรึเปล่า

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot bpen à-rai mái / khǎaw-thôot bpen à-rai rúe bplào
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry. Are you okay?”
    • Example: (You accidentally hit your friend’s chin.)
      • ขอโทษ เป็นอะไรมั๊ย.
      • khǎaw-thôot bpen à-rai mái.
      • “I’m sorry. Are you okay?”

    4- ขอโทษแทน…ด้วย

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot thaaen … dûuai
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry on … behalf.”
    • Example: ผมต้องขอโทษแทนลูกน้องของผมด้วย.
      • Phŏm dtâawng khǎaw-thôot thaaen lûuk náawng khǎawng phŏm dûuai.
      • “I’m sorry on my staff’s behalf.”

    5- ขอโทษที่มาสาย

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot thîi maa sǎai
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry for being late.”
    • Example: ต้องขอโทษที่มาสายด้วย วันนี้รถติดมากเพราะฝนตก.
      • Dtâawng khǎaw-thôot thîi maa sǎai dûuai wan níi rót dtìt mâak phráw fŏn dtòk.
      • “I’m sorry for being late. Today, the traffic is very bad because of the rain.”

    Sorry, I’m late

    6- ขอโทษที่ให้รอ

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot thîi hâi raaw
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry for keeping you waiting.”
    • Example: ขอโทษที่ให้รอนะคะ ได้ผลตรวจแล้วค่ะ.
      • Khǎaw-thôot thîi hâi raaw ná khá dâai phŏn dtrùuat láaeo khâ.
      • “I’m sorry for keeping you waiting. I already got your result.”

    7- ขอโทษที่ทำผิดพลาด

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot thîi tham phìt phlâat
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry for my mistake.”
    • Example: ขอโทษที่ทำผิดพลาดค่ะ จะไม่ให้เกิดเรื่องแบบนี้อีกแล้วค่ะ.
      • Khǎaw-thôot thîi tham phìt phlâat khâ jà mâi hâi gòoet rûueang bàaep níi ìik láaeo khâ.
      • “I’m sorry for my mistake. This won’t happen again.”

    8- ขออภัยในความไม่สะดวก

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw à-phai nai khwaam mâi sà-dùuak
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry for this inconvenience.”
    • Example: ขณะนี้เกิดเหตุขัดข้องทำให้ไม่สามารถใช้งานลิฟท์ได้ชั่วคราว ต้องขออภัยในความไม่สะดวกด้วยค่ะ.
      • Khà-nà níi gòoet hèet khàt khâawng tham hâi mâi săa-mâat chái ngaan líp dâi chûua khraao dtâawng khǎaw à-phai nai khwaam mâi sà-dùuak dûuai khâ.
      • “Elevator can’t be used now because of some issue. I’m sorry for this inconvenience.”
    • Additional note: This phrase is special. In Thai, when apologizing for an inconvenience, Thai people use ขออภัย (khǎaw à-phai) in both spoken and written language. Thai people don’t use ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) in this case.

    9- ขอโทษที่แจ้งกระทันหัน

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot thîi jâaeng grà-than-hăn
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry for the short notice.”
    • Example: ผมต้องขอยกเลิกบริการวันพรุ่งนี้ เพราะ ติดงานกระทันหัน ต้องขอโทษด้วยที่แจ้งกระทันหัน.
      • Phŏm dtâawng khǎaw yók lôoek baaw-rí-gaan wan phrûng-níi phráw dtìt ngaan grà-than-hăn dtâawng khǎaw thôot dûuai thîi jâaeng grà-than-hăn.
      • “I have to cancel service tomorrow because of sudden word. I’m sorry for the short notice.”

    10- ขอโทษที่รบกวน

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot thîi róp-guuan
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry for disturbing.”
    • Example: ขอโทษที่รบกวนนะคะ ขออนุญาตเข้ามาทำความสะอาดค่ะ.
      • Khǎaw-thôot thîi róp-guuan ná khá · khǎaw à-nú-yâat khâo maa tham khwaam sà-àat khâ.
      • “I’m sorry for disturbing you. May I come in to clean?”

    11- ขอโทษที่ตอบช้า

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot thîi dtàawp cháa
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry for the late reply.”
    • Example: ขอโทษที่ตอบช้านะคะ ช่วงนี้งานยุ่งมากค่ะ.
      • Khǎaw-thôot thîi dtàawp cháa ná khá chûuang níi ngaan yûng mâak khâ.
      • “I’m sorry for the late reply. I’m very busy recently.”

    12- ขอโทษ ขอทางหน่อย

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot khǎaw thaang nàauy?
    • Meaning: “Excuse me, can I get through?”
    • Example: (There are a lot of people in the room, making it hard to walk to the other side)
      • ขอโทษค่ะ ขอทางหน่อยค่ะ?
      • Khǎaw-thôot khà khǎaw thaang nàauy khâ?
      • “Excuse me, can I get through?”

    13- ขอโทษ ขอ…หน่อย

    • Thai pronunciation: khǎaw-thôot khǎaw … nàauy
    • Meaning: “Excuse me, can I get …?”
    • Example: ขอโทษค่ะ ขอพริกน้ำปลาหน่อยค่ะ?
      • Khǎaw-thôot khâ kkhǎaw phrík nám-bplaa nàauy khâ?
      • “Excuse me, can you give me chilli in fish sauce?”
    • Additional Note: พริกน้ำปลา (phrík nám-bplaa) is a Thai-style sauce made from fish sauce, chilli, and garlic. Thai people eat พริกน้ำปลา (phrík nám-bplaa) together with fried rice and fried egg.

    Excuse Me, Can I Get พริกน้ำปลา [phrík nám-bplaa] Please?


    3. Phrases for Condolences in Thai

    Now, you may wonder how Thai people share condolences, such as how to say “Sorry for your loss,” in Thai. การแสดงความเสียใจ (gaan sà-daaeng khwaam sĭia-jai) is “condolence” in Thai. In English, you say “I’m sorry for ….” But it’s slightly different in Thai. Thai people don’t say what they’re sorry for, they just feel sorry with you. So there’s only one phrase Thai people use for this.

    1- เสียใจด้วย

    • Thai pronunciation: sĭia-jai dûuai
    • Meaning: “I’m sorry for you.”
    • Example: (Your friend knows that you just lost your beloved one)
      • เสียใจด้วยนะ.
      • sĭia-jai dûuain á.
      • “I’m sorry for you.”


    4. Sentences to Use with “Sorry”

    Sometimes, you don’t say sorry alone. You may want to say other things to convey that you’re really sorry and that you want to make up for what happened. Here’s a list of sentences you can use:

    1- ฉันไม่ได้ตั้งใจ

    • Thai pronunciation: chǎn mâi dâi dtâng-jai
    • Meaning: “I didn’t mean to do this.”
    • Example: ขอโทษที่ทำเธอเจ็บตัว ฉันไม่ได้ตั้งใจ.
      • Khǎaw-thôot thîi tham hâi thoow jèp dtuua chǎn mâi dâi dtâng-jai.
      • “I didn’t mean to hurt you. I am sorry.”

    I’m Sorry. I Didn’t Mean To

    2- ฉันไม่ได้ตั้งใจจะให้เป็นแบบนี้

    • Thai pronunciation: chăn mâi dâi dtâng jai jà hâi bpen bàaep níi
    • Meaning: “I didn’t mean for this to happen.”
    • Example: ขอโทษที่ทำให้ลำบาก ฉันไม่ได้ตั้งใจจะให้เป็นแบบนี้.
      • Khǎaw-thôot thîi tham hâi lam-bàak chăn mâi dâi dtâng jai jà hâi bpen bàaep níie.
      • “I’m sorry for causing trouble. I didn’t mean for this to happen.”

    3- ฉันจะไม่ทำแบบนี้อีกแล้ว

    • Thai pronunciation: chăn jà mâi tham bàaep níi ìik láaeo
    • Meaning: “I won’t do this again.”
    • Example: ขอโทษจริง ๆ ฉันจำไม่ทำแบบนี้อีกแล้ว.
      • Khǎaw-thôot jing jing chăn jà mâi tham bàaep níi ìik láaeo.
      • “I’m really sorry. I won’t do this again.”

    4- ดีกันนะ

    • Thai pronunciation: dii gan ná
    • Meaning: “Let’s reconcile.”
    • Example: ขอโทษ ดีกันนะ.
      • khǎaw-thôot dii gan ná.
      • “I’m sorry. Let’s reconcile.”
    • Additional note: This is an informal phrase. Thai people only say this to friends, family members, or people who they’re close with.

    5- อย่าโกรธเลยนะ

    • Thai pronunciation: yàa gròot looei ná
    • Meaning: “Please don’t be mad at me.”
    • Example: ขอโทษค่ะ อย่าโกรธหนูเลยนะ.
      • khǎaw-thôot yàa gròot nǔu looei ná.
      • “I’m sorry, please don’t be mad at me.”
    • Additional note: This is also an informal phrase. Thai people only say this to friends, family members, or people who they’re close with.

    6- ยกโทษให้ฉันเถอะ

    • Thai pronunciation: yók thôot hâi chăn thòe
    • Meaning: “Please forgive me.”
    • Example: ขอโทษ ยกโทษให้เราเถอะนะ.
      • khǎaw-thôot yók thôot hâi rao thòe ná.
      • “I’m sorry, please forgive me.”

    7- มันเป็นความผิดของฉันเอง

    • Thai pronunciation: man bpen khwaam phìt khǎawng chăn eeng
    • Meaning: “It is my fault.”
    • Example: มันเป็นความผิดของฉันเอง ขอโทษนะ.
      • man bpen khwaam phìt khǎawng chăn eeng khǎaw-thôot ná.
      • “This is my fault. I’m sorry.”


    5. Reply Phrases for When Someone Says Sorry to You

    Now that we’ve gone over various ways to say sorry, we’ll now go over what to say when someone says sorry to us. The list below shows some of the phrases you can use.

    1- ไม่เป็นไร

    • Thai pronunciation: mâi bpen rai
    • Meaning: “It is okay.” / “It is alright.”
    • How to use: This is the main way to reply when you’re okay or no longer angry. This can be used in every situation, both formal and informal.

    2- ฉันยกโทษให้

    • Thai pronunciation: chǎn yók thôot hâi
    • Meaning: “I forgive you.”
    • How to use: You say this to show that you forgive the other party or parties.

    3- ช่างมันเถอะ

    • Thai pronunciation: châng man thòe
    • Meaning: “Never mind.”
    • How to use: This is another way you can say that you’re no longer angry. However, this is quite informal. Thai people only say this to friends, family members, or people who they’re close with.

    4- ลืม ๆ มันไปเหอะ

    • Thai pronunciation: luuem luuem man bpai hòe
    • Meaning: “Just forget it.”
    • How to use: This phrase also shows that you’re no longer angry and forgive them. It’s an informal phrase, so don’t use it in a business situation.

    5- ฉันไม่ยกโทษให้

    • Thai pronunciation: chǎn mâi yók thôot hâi
    • Meaning: “I don’t forgive you.”
    • How to use: You say this to show that you’re still mad for what the other party or parties did and don’t forgive them yet.

    I’m Still Mad at You


    6. Tips on How to Say Sorry in Thai

    If you’ve reached this part of the article, you’ll find that if you want to be able to say sorry like Thai people, there’s quite a lot to practice and remember. Here are some tips that will help you make your apology sound either formal or informal. To make the sentence sound formal or informal in the Thai language, it depends on pronouns and the word you put at the end of a sentence.

    1- Pronoun

    There are many Thai pronouns you can use to call yourself. Each one can be used in a different situation depending on the level of formality and the gender of the speaker. Here’s the list of Thai pronouns you can use, ordered by level of formality from the most formal to least formal.

    • Male: ผม (phǒm); เรา (rao)
    • Female: ดิฉัน (dì-chǎn); ฉัน (chǎn); เรา (rao); หนู (nǔu) [Nǔu is only used when talking to older people.]

    Still, please note that in Thai, sometimes people cut off the subject if the speaker is the one who did the action. So, you may hear Thai people say ขอโทษนะ (khǎaw-thôot ná) instead of ฉันขอโทษนะ (chǎn khǎaw-thôot ná) when saying “I’m sorry.”

    2- Khráp and Khâ

    To make a sentence sound formal in Thai, Thai people put the word ครับ (khráp) or ค่ะ (khâ) at the end of a sentence when speaking. ครับ (khráp) is used when the speaker is male, while ค่ะ (khâ) is used when the speaker is female. If you want to say sorry informally, there’s no need to put ครับ (khráp) or ค่ะ (khâ) at the end of the sentence.

    Apart from ครับ (khráp) and ค่ะ (khâ), Thai people sometimes put นะ (ná) at the end of an informal sentence to make it sound more friendly. These words are คำลงท้าย (kham long tháai) in Thai.


    7. Conclusion

    By now, you should know some basic words for how to say sorry in Thai. We hope you now have a better idea of the importance of “sorry” in learning Thai.

    If nothing else, work on memorizing ขอโทษ (khǎaw-thôot) and ไม่เป็นไร (mâi bpen rai). You can use them in almost any situation. However, if you know many phrases, you can express your feelings better, so keep practicing. Once you know them all, don’t forget to learn other interesting and fun Thai lessons at ThaiPod101.com.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai