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Archive for the 'Thai Grammar' Category

Basic Thai Questions and Answers You Should Know

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As a new Thai language-learner, do you find it hard to make conversation with native speakers? Because speaking Thai as often as possible is a great way to acquire the language, knowing the most common questions and answers in Thai conversations will be very helpful for you.  

Having a Thai Conversation

In this lesson, you’ll learn about asking questions in Thai and how you can answer them yourself. Knowing these common Thai questions and answers will give you the confidence you need to practice speaking more often! 

However, before we start our list of the top ten questions in Thai, there are a few things you need to know first.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. An Overview of Asking Questions in Thai
  2. Our Thai Questions and Answers List
  3. Conclusion

1. An Overview of Asking Questions in Thai

First things first! We’ll answer some common Thai grammar questions that learners have, and introduce you to the basic vocabulary you should know.   

1 – Thai Question Marks 

When going over the topic of Thai questions, many learners wonder “Are there question marks in Thai?” The answer is yes, there are question marks in the Thai language.  

In Thai, question marks are called ปรัศนี (bpràt-sà-nii) and เครื่องหมายคำถาม (khrùueng-mǎai-kham-thǎam). In normal conversations, people usually use เครื่องหมายคำถาม (khrùueng-mǎai-kham-thǎam). ปรัศนี (bpràt-sà-nii) is rarely used in daily conversation; it’s only used in academic contexts.  

That said, there’s no rule about asking questions in Thai grammar that requires you to put a question mark after your question. Thai people really only put question marks after a question to show that they’re really in doubt and want to know the answer.

2 – Pronouns Used in Thai Questions and Answers

When you ask or answer questions in Thai, you can use both names and pronouns, so you’ll find it easier if you know some Thai pronouns. Below are some examples of pronouns often used in Thai questions and answers.

Thai pronouns for you:

  • คุณ (khun) is used in formal or business situations. It can be used with both males and females.
  • นาย (naai) is used in casual situations. It can be used with males only.
  • เธอ (thooe) is used in casual situations. It can be used with females only.

Thai pronouns for I:

  • ฉัน (chǎn) is used when the speaker is female.
  • ผม (phǒm) is used when the speaker is male.

You’ll find throughout this lesson that Thai people often omit the subject from the sentence, so don’t be surprised if you don’t hear any name or pronoun when speaking with natives.

3 – Making Questions and Answers Formal

To make a sentence formal in Thai, put the word ครับ (khráp) or ค่ะ (khâ) at the end of a sentence when speaking. ครับ (khráp) is used when the speaker is male, while ค่ะ (khâ) is used when the speaker is female. 

Keep in mind that there’s a special rule when it comes to questions: for females, instead of using ค่ะ (khâ), you put คะ (khá) after questions.

Now, let’s start learning ten common Thai phrases and questions.

2. Our Thai Questions and Answers List

First Encounter

1. What’s your name? 

The first question you should learn is how to ask for someone’s name. This is an easy question to ask in Thai, and it’s a great way to start a conversation with someone you don’t know.

1 – Thai question

Question pattern:
pronoun for “you” / noun + ชื่ออะไร
pronoun for “you” / noun + chûue-à-rai
“What is your name?”

2 – Thai answers

Answer pattern 1:
pronoun for “I” + ชื่อ + ___
pronoun for “I” + chûue + ___
“My name is ___.”

Answer pattern 2:
ชื่อ + ___
chûue + ___
“My name is ___.”

Answer pattern 3:
Just say your name.

Additional Note:  
Patterns 2 and 3 are short versions of pattern 1, which is the full answer. Of the three patterns, pattern 1 is the most formal, followed by pattern 2, with pattern 3 being the most casual.

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
ลูกค้าชื่ออะไรคะ
lûuk-khaa-chûue-à-rai-khá
“What is the customer’s name?” (You are talking to the customer.)

Thai answer:  
ผมชื่อป้องศักดิ์ครับ
phǒm-chûue-bpâawng-sàk-khráp
“My name is Pongsak.”

Example 2

Thai question:  
เธอชื่ออะไร
thooe-chûue-à-rai
“What is your name?”

Thai answer:  
กิ๊ฟ
gíp
“Gip.”

2. Where are you from? 

To learn more about someone, one of the best Thai language questions to ask is “Where are you from?” There are a few ways to ask this question, shown below.

1 – Thai questions

Question pattern 1:  
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + มาจากที่ไหน
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + maa-jàak-thîi-nǎi
“Where are you from?”

Question pattern 2:  
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + เป็นคนจังหวัดอะไร
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + bpen-khon-jang-wàt-à-rai
“Which province are you from?”

Question pattern 3:  
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + เป็นคนประเทศอะไร
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + bpen-khon-bprà-thêet-à-rai
“Which country are you from?”

Additional Note:  
When Thai people are asked where they come from, they often answer with the name of the province they grew up in. Thus, you can use pattern 2 specifically with a Thai person. Pattern 3, as you can guess, is used with foreigners.

2 – Thai answers

Answer pattern 1:  
pronoun for “I” + มาจาก + ___
pronoun for “I” + maa-jàak + ___
“I come from ___.”

Answer pattern 2
มาจาก + ___
maa-jàak + ___
“I come from ___.”

Answer pattern 3:  
Just say the name of your hometown or country.

Additional Note:  
Patterns 1 through 3 can be used to answer all of the questions above. Patterns 2 and 3 are the short versions of pattern 1, which is the full answer. Pattern 1 is the most formal, followed by pattern 2, with pattern 3 being the most casual.

Answer pattern 4:  
pronoun for “I” + เป็นคน + name of province or country
pronoun for “I” + bpen-khon + ___
“I come from ___.”

Answer pattern 5:  
คน + name of province or country
khon + ___
“I am ___.”

Additional Note:  
Patterns 4 and 5 are used to answer question patterns 2 and 3 only. As you can see, pattern 5 is the short version of pattern 4.

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
เดวิดมาจากที่ไหน
dee-vìt-maa-jàak-thîi-nǎi
“Where are you from?” (You are talking to David.)

Thai answer:  
มาจากออสเตเรียครับ
maa-jàak-áawt-dtee-riia
“I come from Australia.”

Example 2

Thai question:  
นักเรียนเป็นคนจังหวัดอะไร
nák-riian-bpen-khon-jang-wàt-à-rai
“Which province are you from?” (You are talking to a student.)

Thai answer:  
คนลพบุรีค่ะ
khon lóp-bù-rii khà
“I come from Lopburi.”

3. Do you speak ___? 

This is one of the best Thai questions for foreigners. Knowing the language skills of other parties makes it easier to communicate, in case you can speak the same language. ^^

1 – Thai question

Question pattern:  
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + พูดภาษา___ได้มั้ย
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + phûut-phaa-sǎa-___-dâi-mái
“Do you speak ___?”

2 – Thai answers

Answer pattern 1:  
ได้
dâi
“Yes.”

Answer pattern 2:  
ได้นิดหน่อย
dâi-nit-nàauy
“Yes, a little bit.”

Answer pattern 3:  
ไม่ได้
mâi-dâi
“No.”

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
ลดาพูดภาษาจีนได้มั้ย
lá-daa-phûut-phaa-sǎa-jiin-dâi-mái
“Does Lada speak Chinese?”

Thai answer:  
ได้นิดหน่อย
dâi-nit-nàauy
“Yes, a little bit.”

Example 2

Thai question:  
น้ำตาลพูดภาษาอังกฤษได้มั้ย
nám-dtaan-phûut-phaa-sǎa-ang-grìt-dâi-mái
Does Namtarn speak English?

Thai answer:  
ได้ หนูเคยไปเรียนที่อเมริกา 3 ปี
dai nǔu-khooei-bpai-riian-thii-a-mee-ri-gaa-saam-bpii
“Yes, I do. I have studied in the United States for three years.”

4. How long have you been studying ___? 

To continue the conversation, you can ask this question in Thai.

1 – Thai questions

Question pattern 1:  
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + เรียนภาษา___มานานเท่าไหร่แล้ว
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + riian-phaa-sǎa-___-maa-naan-thâo-rài-láaeo
“How long have you been studying ___?”

Question pattern 2:  
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + เรียนภาษา___มากี่ปีแล้ว
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + riian-phaa-sǎa-___-maa-gìi-bpii-láaeo
“How many years have you been studying ___?”

2 – Thai answers

Answer pattern 1:  
pronoun for “I” + เรียนมา ___ ปี / เดือน
pronoun for “I” + riian-maa-___-bpii / duuean
“I have studied for ___ years / months.”

Answer pattern 2:  
เรียนมา ___ ปี / เดือน
riian-maa-___-bpii / duuean
“I have studied for ___ years / months.”

Answer pattern 3:  
pronoun for “I” + เรียนมาตั้งแต่อายุ ___ ปีแล้ว
pronoun for “I” + riian-maa-dtâng-dtàae-aa-yú-___-bpii-lâaeo
“I have studied since I was ___ years old.”

Answer pattern 4:  
เรียนมาตั้งแต่อายุ ___ ขวบ / ปีแล้ว
Riian-maa-dtâng-dtàae-aa-yú-___-khùuap / bpii-lâaeo
“I have studied since I was ___ years old.”

Pattern 2 is the short version of pattern 1, and pattern 4 is the short version of pattern 3. The subject of the sentence is omitted as Thai people assume you already know who you’re talking about.

ขวบ (khùuap) and ปี (bpii) are both numeric classifiers of age. ขวบ (khùuap) is used for ages under thirteen years old, while ปี (bpii) is used for ages thirteen years old and above.

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
มิกิเรียนภาษาไทยมานานกี่ปีแล้วคะ
mí-gì-riian-phaa-sǎa-thai-maa-naan-gìi-bpii-láaeo-khá
How many years has Miki studied the Thai language?” (You are talking to Miki.)

Thai answer:  
เรียนมา 2 ปีแล้ว
riian-maa-sǎawng-bpii-láaeo-khà
“I have studied Thai for two years now.”

Example 2

Thai question:  
คุณเรียนภาษาอังกฤษมานานเท่าไหร่แล้วครับ
khun-riian-phaa-sǎa-ang-grìt-maa-naan-thâo-rài-láaeo-khráp
“How long have you studied English?”

Thai answer:  
ฉันเรียนภาษาอังกฤษมาตั้งแต่อายุ 3 ขวบค่ะ
chǎn-riian-phaa-sǎa-ang-grìt-maa-dtâng-dtàae-aa-yú-sǎam-khûuap-khà
“I have studied English since I was three years old.”

5. Have you been to ___? 

This is another conversational Thai question you should know, and you’re likely to hear it from travel enthusiasts! 

1 – Thai question

Question pattern:  
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + เคยไปประเทศ___มั้ย
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + khooei-bpai-bprà-thêet-___-mái
“Have you been to ___?”

2 – Thai answers

Answer pattern 1
เคย
khooei
“Yes, I have.”

Answer pattern 2:  
ไม่เคย
mâi-khooei
“No, I haven’t.”

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
คุณป้าเคยไปประเทศญี่ปุ่นมั้ยคะ
khun-bpâa-khooei-bpai-bprà-thêet-yîi-bpùn-mái-khá
“Have you been to Japan?” (You are talking to your aunt.)

Thai answer:  
เคยจ๊ะ ปีที่แล้วป้าไปเที่ยวที่โตเกียวมา
khooei-já pbii-thîi-láaeo-bpâa-bpai-thîiao-thîi-dtoo-giiao-maa
“Yes, I have. I traveled to Tokyo last year.”

Example 2

Thai question:  
เธอเคยไปอยุธยามั้ย
thooe-khooei-bpai-à-yút-thá-yaa-mái
Have you been to Ayutthaya?

Thai answer:  
ไม่เคย แต่อยากไปมากนะ
mâi-khooei dtàae-yàak-bpai-mâak-ná
“No, I haven’t. But I really want to go there.”

Introducing Yourself

6. What do you do for work? 

If you’re asking questions in Thai to get to know more about someone, asking about their occupation is a must.  Good news: This conversational question in Thai is very easy.

1 – Thai question

Question pattern:  
pronoun for “you” / name + ทำอาชีพอะไร
pronoun for “you” / name + tham-aa-chîip-à-rai
What do you do for work?

2 – Thai answer

Answer pattern
pronoun for “I” + เป็น ___
pronoun for “I” + bpen ___
“I am a(n) ___.”

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
คุณธัญญ์ทำอาชีพอะไรคะ
khun-than-tham-aa-chîip-à-rai-khá
“What does Than do for work?” (You are talking to Than.)

Thai answer:  
ผมเป็นวิศวกรครับ
khun-than-tham-aa-chîip-à-rai-khá
“I am an engineer.”

I am an Engineer
Example 2

Thai question:  
นายทำอาชีพอะไร
naai-tham-aa-chîip-à-rai
“What do you do for work?”

Thai answer:  
ผมเป็นครู
phǒm-bpen-khruu
“I am a teacher.”

7. Do you like ___ food? 

Asking someone about their food preferences is a fantastic way to get to know someone, and to find common ground.  

1 – Thai question

Question pattern:  
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + ชอบอาหาร___มั้ย
pronoun for “you” / noun / name + châawp-aa-hǎan-___-mái
“Do you like ___ food?”

2 – Thai answers

Answer pattern 1
ชอบ
châawp
“Yes, I do.”

Answer pattern 2:  
ไม่ชอบ
mâi-châawp
“No, I don’t.”

Answer pattern 3:  
เฉย ๆ
chǒoei-chǒoei
“Indifferent.”

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
คุณครูชอบอาหารอินเดียมั้ยคะ
khun-khruu-châawp-aa-hǎan-in-diia-mái-khá
“Do you like Indian food?” (You are talking to a teacher.)

Thai answer:  
ชอบครับ หอมกลิ่นเครื่องเทศดี
châawp-khráp hǎawm-glìn-khrûueng-thêet-dii
“Yes, I do. The spices smell nice.”

Example 2

Thai question:  
โคลอี้ชอบอาหารไทยมั้ย
khloo-îi-châawp-aa-hǎan-thai-mái
“Do you like Thai food?” (You are talking to Chole.)

Thai answer:  
เฉย ๆ เพราะฉันทานเผ็ดไม่ได้
chǒoei-chǒoei phráw-chǎn-thaan-phèt-mâi-dâi
“I’m indifferent because I can’t eat spicy food.”

8. What are you doing?

This question can be used to start a conversation with someone, and to show that you’re interested in their life. 

1 – Thai question

Question pattern:  
pronoun for “you” / noun + ทำอะไรอยู่
pronoun for “you” / noun + tham-à-rai-yùu
“What are you doing?”

2 – Thai answers

Answer pattern 1
pronoun for “I” + กำลัง + verb + อยู่
pronoun for “I” + gam-lang + verb + yùu
“I am ___ now.”

Answer pattern 2
verb + อยู่
verb + yùu
“I am ___ now.”

Additional note:  
Pattern 2 is the short version of pattern 1. The subject of the sentence is omitted as Thai people assume you already know who you’re talking about.

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
นักเรียนทำอะไรอยู่คะ
nák-riian-tham-à-rai-yùu-kha
“What are you doing?” (You are talking to a student.)

Thai answer:  
หนูกำลังทำการบ้านอยู่ค่ะ
nǔu-gam-lang-tham-gaan-bâan-yùu-khà
“I am doing homework now.”

I am Doing Homework Now
Example 2

Thai question:  
แม่ทำอะไรอยู่
mâae-tham-à-rai-yùu
“Mom, what are you doing?”

Thai answer:  
อาบน้ำอยู่
àap-nám-yùu
I’m taking a shower.”

9. What is wrong? 

To ask someone what’s wrong, there are a few different questions in Thai that you can use. 

1 – Thai questions

Question pattern 1:  
เกิดอะไรขึ้น
gòoet-à-rai-khûen
“What’s happened? What’s wrong?”

The literal meaning of this pattern is “What’s happened?” You ask this when you sense that something bad has happened and you want to know what it is.

Question pattern 2:  
มีปัญหาอะไรรึเปล่า
mii-bpan-hǎa-à-rai-rúe-bplào
“Is there any problem?”

This is another way to ask “What’s wrong?” when you sense that something bad happened.

2 – Thai answers

Answer pattern 1
Explain your problem or issues.

Answer pattern 2
ไม่มีอะไร
mâi-mii-à-rai
“Nothing wrong, no problem.”

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
เสียงดังอะไรกัน มีปัญหาอะไรรึเปล่า
sǐiang-dang-à-rai-gan mii-bpan-hǎa-à-rai-rúe-bplào
“What is that loud noise? Is there any problem?”

Thai answer:  
ไม่มีอะไร ของตกเฉย ๆ
mâi-mii-à-rai khǎawng-dtok-chǒoei-chǒoei
“No problem. Something just fell.”

Example 2

Thai question:  
เกิดอะไรขึ้น ทำไมเธอถึงร้องไห้
gòoet-à-rai-khûen tham-mai-thooe-thǔeng-ráawng-hâi
“What’s wrong? Why are you crying?

Thai answer:  
มีคนบอกว่าแฟนนอกใจฉัน
mii-khon-bàawk-wâa-faaen-nâawk-jai-chǎn
“Someone told me my boyfriend cheated on me.”

What’s Wrong? Why Are You Crying?

10. How much is ___? 

Asking for the price of products and services is an important conversational skill to have in any country. Here are the Thai questions and answers you can use! 

1 – Thai questions

Question pattern 1:  
noun / pronoun + ราคาเท่าไหร่
noun / pronoun + raa-khaa-thâo-rài
“How much is noun/pronoun?”

Question pattern 2:  
noun / pronoun + ราคากี่บาท
noun / pronoun + raa-khaa-gìi-bàat
“How much is noun/pronoun?”

Despite having the same meaning, pattern 1 is more formal than pattern 2.

2 – Thai answers

Answer pattern 1
noun / pronoun + ราคา ___ บาท
noun / pronoun + raa-khaa-___-bàat
“Noun / pronoun is ___ Baht.”

Answer pattern 2
___ บาท
___-bàat
“___ Baht.”

Pattern 2 is the short version of pattern 1.

3 – Examples

Example 1

Thai question:  
กะหล่ำปลีราคากี่บาท
gà-làm-bplii-raa-khaa-gìi-bàat
“How much is the cabbage?”

Thai answer:  
30 บาท
sǎam-sìp-bàat
“30 Baht.”

Example 2

Thai question:  
รถคันนี้ราคาเท่าไหร่ครับ
rót-khan-níi-raa-khaa-thâo-rài-khráp
“How much is this car?”

Thai answer:  
รถคันนั้นราคา 500,000 บาทค่ะ
rót-khan-nán-raa-khaa-hâa-sǎaen-bàat-khà
“That car costs 500,000 Baht.”

11. Conclusion

You’ve just finished learning the basics about how to ask questions in Thai. If you can remember all of these common questions and answers, you have all you need to practice your Thai speaking and listening skills through conversations with Thai people. We hope this article has been very helpful for you! 

Now that you’ve finished this lesson, you may be curious about related topics such as question words in Thai,  which you can learn on ThaiPod101.com as well. Of course, there are other interesting lessons for you to study, such as Thai Girl’s Dream Job and Thai Jokes. Don’t forget to visit ThaiPod101.com and check out new lessons as they become available. 

Before you go, practice writing some of these Thai questions and answers in the comments section, and answer the questions about yourself. We look forward to hearing from you!

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Basic Thai Sentence Patterns – A Comprehensive Guide

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When you learn any language, knowing its basic sentence patterns helps you get a grip of the language as a whole, and allows you to communicate more effectively. So if you’re a Thai learner and don’t know how to form sentences in Thai yet, knowing certain Thai sentence structures and patterns is like a shortcut to creating your own sentences.  

In this lesson, we’ll teach you common Thai sentence patterns that you can use in daily life. While there are various types of sentence patterns in the Thai language, we’ll focus on just ten patterns with examples. Also keep in mind that we won’t be focusing on the tenses today. 

Let’s get started!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Linking Two Nouns: A is B
  2. Describing Nouns: A is [Adjective]
  3. [Subject] Wants / Needs
  4. [Subject] has to [Verb]
  5. [Subject] Likes [Noun/Verb]
  6. Please…
  7. May I? / Can I?
  8. What is…?
  9. When is…?
  10. Where is…?
  11. Conclusion

1. Linking Two Nouns: A is B

Before we give you our list of Thai sentence patterns, we think you should know some basic vocabulary:  

  • รูปแบบประโยค (rûup-bàaep-bprà-yòok) is “sentence pattern”
  • รูปแบบ (rûup-bàaep) is “pattern” 
  • ประโยค (bprà-yòok) is “sentence” 
Sentence Patterns

The first simple Thai sentence pattern you should know is “A is B,” which is used for linking two nouns. Below are some examples of this Thai sentence structure.

Sentence structure
A + เป็น (bpen) + B
A + คือ (khuue) + B

Explanation:  

เป็น (bpen), อยู่ (yùu), and คือ (khuue) are used for the verb “to be” in Thai. While they all refer to the same verb, เป็น (bpen), อยู่ (yùu), and คือ (khuue) have different meanings, are used in different situations, and can’t substitute one another.  

  • เป็น (bpen) is used to explain what A is. The information used to explain A can include things such as a person’s job or marital status.
  • อยู่ (yùu) is used to explain where A is. So in this case, B is the place.
  • คือ (khuue) is used to explain what A is. The information used to explain A is either a fact/status that doesn’t change, or information that other parties don’t know.

Because เป็น (bpen) and คือ (khuue) seem pretty similar, it can be difficult to decide which one to use in a given scenario. Even Thai people find this hard; they can use it correctly, but can’t explain why. Let’s look at some Thai example sentences to help you understand better.  

Example 1:  
แม่เป็นครู
mâae-bpen-khruu
“Mom is a teacher.”

A Teacher Carrying a Stack of Books

Mom is a teacher.

Example 2:  
แก้วเป็นสาวโสด
gâaew-bpen-sǎao-sòot
“Kaew is a single lady.”

Example 3:  
ฤทธิเป็นคนที่ไม่เก่งเลขเลย
rít-bpen-khon-thîi-mâi-gèng-lêek-looei
“Rit is a person who is not good at math.”

Example 4:  
ตอนนี้รัตน์อยู่ที่นี่
dtaawn-níi-rát-yùu-thîi-nîi
“Rat is here now.”

Example 5:  
กระเป๋าอยู่บนโต๊ะทานอาหาร
grà-bpǎo-yùu-bon-dtó-thaan-aa-hǎan
“The bag is on the dining table.”

Example 6:  
หมีแพนด้าอยู่ในสวนสัตว์ที่เชียงใหม่
mǐi-phaaen-dâa-yùu-nai-sǔuan-sàt-thîi-chiiang-mài
“Pandas are in the zoo at Chaingmai.”

Example 7:  
ที่นี่คือโรงพยาบาลที่ใหญ่ที่สุดในจังหวัด
thîi-nîi-khuue-roong-phá-yaa-baan-thîi-yài-thîi-sùt-nai-jang-wàt
“Here is the largest hospital in the province.”

Hospital Workers and a Patient in a Hallway

Here is the largest hospital in the province.

Example 8:  
ลัดดาคือเพื่อนที่ดีที่สุดของฉัน
lát-daa-khuue-phûuean-thîi-dii-thîi-sùt-khǎawng-chǎn
“Ladda is my best friend.”

Example 9:  
ผลไม้ที่พ่อชอบกินที่สุดคือแตงโม
phǒn-lá-mái-thîi-phâaw-châawp-gin-thîi-sùt-khuue-dtaaeng-moo
“Dad’s favorite fruit is watermelon.”

2. Describing Nouns: A is [Adjective]

Another Thai sentence construction you should know is “A is [Adjective].” This is a very easy Thai sentence pattern, used to describe nouns with adjectives. Let’s take a look.

Sentence structure:  

Noun + Adjective

Explanation:  

If you want to describe a noun, all you have to do is put the adjective after that noun.

Example 1:  
กานดาสูงและผอม
gaan-daa-sǔung-láe-phǎawm
“Ganda is tall and slim.”

Example 2:  
เก้าอี้ไม้ตัวนั้นราคาแพงมาก
gâo-îi-mái-dtuua-nán-raa-khaa-phaaeng-mâak
“That wooden chair is very expensive.”

Example 3:  
มะระสีเขียวและมีรสขม
má-rá-mii-sǐi-khǐiao-láe-mii-rót-khǒm
Bitter melon is green and bitter.”

Additional note:  

มะระ (má-rá) is “bitter melon” in Thai. It’s one of the fruits that Thai people like to eat.

Sentence Components

3. [Subject] Wants / Needs

Some of the most useful Thai phrases are those for expressing “want” and “need.” There are a few different Thai sentence patterns you should remember for this.

Sentence structure:  
subject + ต้องการ (dtâawng-gaan) + noun / verb
subject + อยาก (yàak) + verb
subject + อยากได้ (yàak-dâi) + noun 

Explanation:  

ต้องการ (dtâawng-gaan), อยาก (yàak), and อยากได้ (yàak-dâi) mean both “want” and “need” in Thai, and can substitute one another.

However, ต้องการ (dtâawng-gaan) sounds more formal than อยาก (yàak) and อยากได้ (yàak-dâi). Thai people often use ต้องการ (dtâawng-gaan) in formal situations, and อยาก (yàak) and อยากได้ (yàak-dâi) in casual conversations.  

To express your wants and needs, you can use any of the structures above. Here are a few Thai sentence examples for you.

Example 1:  
คุณครูต้องการคอมพิวเตอร์เครื่องใหม่
khun-khruu-dtâawng-gaan-khaawm-phíu-dtôoe-khrûueng-mài
“The teachers want a new computer.”

Example 2:  
โรงพยาบาลต้องการจ้างนางพยาบาลเพิ่ม
roong-phá-yaa-baan-dtâawng-gaan-jâang-naang-phá-yaa-baan-phôoem
“The hospital wants to hire more nurses.”

Example 3:  
เธอต้องการอะไรเพิ่มมั๊ย
thooe-dtâawng-gaan-à-rai-phôoem-mái
“Do you want anything more?”

Example 4:  
น้ำตาลอยากไปเที่ยวหัวหิน
nám-dtaan-yàak-bpai-thîiao-hǔua-hǐn
“Namtan wants to go to Huahin.”

Example 5:  
แม่อยากลองทำเค้กสูตรใหม่
mâae-yàak-laawng-tham-khéek-sùut-mài
“Mom wants to try a new cake recipe.”

Cake Batter being Mixed

Mom wants to try a new cake recipe.

Example 6:  
มินท์อยากแต่งงานก่อนอายุ 30 ปี
mín-yàak-dtàaeng-ngaan-gàawn-aa-yú-sǎam-sìp
“Mint wants to get married before she is 30 years old.”

Example 7:  
ฉันอยากได้รองเท้าคู่ใหม่
chǎn-yàak-dâi-raawng-tháo-khûu-mài
“I want a new pair of shoes.”

Example 8:  
รพีไม่อยากได้งานเพิ่ม
rá-phii-mâi-yàak-dâi-ngaan-phôoem
“Rapee doesn’t want more jobs.”

Example 9:  
มีใครอยากได้ชาเพิ่มมั๊ย
mii-khrai-yàak-dâi-chaa-phôoem-mái
“Anyone want more tea?”

4. [Subject] has to [Verb] 

Another basic Thai sentence pattern you should know is “I have …”.  You can use this Thai sentence pattern to express what you have to do.

Sentence structure:  

Subject + ต้อง (dtâawng) + Verb

Explanation:  

This type of sentence in Thai is pretty easy and straightforward. You just put the subject, followed by ต้อง (dtâawng), which means “must” or “have to” in Thai, and then the verb.

Example 1:  
เธอต้องออกจากบ้านเดี๋ยวนี้ ไม่งั้นจะสาย
thooe-dtâawng-àawk-jàak-bâan-dǐiao-níi mâi-ngán-jà-sǎai
“You have to leave now or else you will be late.”

Example 2:  
ยายต้องกินยาก่อนนอนทุกวัน
yaai-dtâawng-gin-yaa-gàawn-naawn-thúuk-wan
“Grandma has to take medicine before bed every day.”

Example 3:  
วรรณาต้องไปเชียงรายพรุ่งนี้
wan-naa-dtâawng-bpai-chiiang-raai-phrûng-níi
“Wanna has to go to Chiangrai tomorrow.”

5. [Subject] Likes [Noun/Verb] 

Another common Thai language sentence structure is that for expressing likes and preferences. It’s one of the most basic Thai sentence patterns you can use to talk about your favorite things and activities.

Sentence structure:  

Subject + ชอบ (châawp) + Noun / Verb

Explanation:  

ชอบ (châawp) is “like” in Thai. To use this sentence pattern, you put the subject, followed by ชอบ (châawp), and then the noun or verb.

Example 1:  
แม่ชอบกินแก้วมังกร
mâae-châawp-gin-gâaeo-mang-gaawn
“Mom likes to eat dragon fruits.”

Example 2:  
นภาชอบสีชมพู
ná-phaa-châawp-sǐi-chom-phuu
“Napa likes pink.”

A Girl Wearing Lots of Pink

Napa likes pink.

Example 3:  
ตุ้มไม่ชอบดูหนังผี
dtûm-mâi-châawp-duu-nǎng-phǐi
“Tum doesn’t like scary movies.”

6. Please… 

The next basic Thai sentence structure we’ll show you is used to politely ask someone to do something. There are two Thai sentence patterns you need to know.

Sentence structure:  
กรุณา (gà-rú-naa) + Verb 
ช่วย (chûuai) + Verb 

Explanation:  

Thai people use กรุณา (gà-rú-naa) and ช่วย (chûuai) when they want to ask others to do something. กรุณา (gà-rú-naa) and ช่วย (chûuai) are pretty much the same, except กรุณา (gà-rú-naa) is used in formal situations while ช่วย (chûuai) is more often used in casual conversations.

Example 1:  
กรุณาถอดรองเท้าก่อนเข้าห้อง
gà-rú-naa-thàawt-raawng-tháo-gàawn-khâo-hâawng
“Please take off your shoes before entering the room.”

Example 2:  
กรุณาอย่าส่งเสียงดัง
gà-rú-naa-yàa-sòng-sǐiang-dang
“Please don’t make loud noises.”

Example 3:  
กรุณาให้ความร่วมมือกับเจ้าหน้าที่
gà-rú-naa-hâi-khwaam-rûuam-muue-gàp-jâo-nâa-thîi
“Please cooperate with our staff.”

Example 4:  
ช่วยฉันทำความสะอาดห้องหน่อย
chûuai-chǎn-tham-khaawm-sà-àat-hâawng-nàauy
“Please help me clean the room.”

Example 5:  
ช่วยเงียบหน่อย
chûuai-ngîiap-nàauy
“Please be quiet.”

A Woman at a Movie Theater Making the Quiet Gesture

Please be quiet.

Example 6:  
ช่วยเดินเร็ว ๆ หน่อย
chûuai-dooen-reo-reo-nòi
“Please walk faster.”

7. May I? / Can I?

This sentence pattern in Thai is used to ask for permission. However, this is considered an imperfect sentence because Thai people leave the word “may” or “can” out.

Sentence structure:  

ขอ (khǎaw) + Verb + ได้มั้ย (dâi-mái)

Explanation:  

This Thai sentence pattern is quite different from its  English counterpart. This is because there is no ฉัน (chǎn), which is “I” in Thai, in the sentence.    

You start the sentence with ขอ (khǎaw), which means “ask.” Next, you put the verb, followed by ได้มั้ย (dâi-mái), which is used to make a permission question in Thai.

Example 1:  
ขอเข้าไปได้มั้ย
khǎaw-khâo-bpai-dâi-mái
“May I come in?”

Example 2:  
ขอยืมหนังสือเล่มนั้นได้มั้ย
khǎaw-yuuem-nǎng-sǔue-lêm-nán-dâi-mái
“Can I borrow that book?”

A Woman Smiling with a Book on Top of Her Head

Can I borrow that book?

Example 3:  
ขอไปดูหนังกับเพื่อนวันเสาร์นี้ได้มั้ย
khǎaw-bpai-duu-nǎng-gàp-phûuen-wan-sǎo-níi-dâi-mái
“Can I go see the movie with my friend this Saturday?”

8. What is…? 

Another useful Thai sentence pattern you should learn is “What is…?” You can use this sentence pattern in Thai to ask for information about something.

Sentence structure:  

… + คือ (khuue) + อะไร (à-rai

Explanation:  

As mentioned earlier, คือ (khuue) is one of the words for the verb “to be” in Thai. Also note that อะไร (à-rai) is “what.”  

You may notice that Thai people use คือ (khuue), not เป็น (bpen), in this sentence structure. This is because you’re asking for information you don’t know.

Example 1:  
นี่คืออะไร
nîi-khuue-à-rai
“What is this?”

Example 2:  
อาหารที่เราสั่งครั้งที่แล้วคืออะไร
aa-hǎan-thîi-rao-sàng-khráng-thîi-láaeo-khuue-à-rai
“What is the food we ordered last time?”

Example 3:  
เครื่องดื่มที่คุณชอบคืออะไร
khrûueng-dùuem-thîi-khun-châawp-khuue-à-rai
“What is your favorite drink?”

9. When is…? 

Now that you’ve learned the “What is …?” sentence structure, it makes sense to learn the “When is…?” structure as well. With this structure, you can make Thai phrases for asking about the time.

Sentence structure:  

… + เมื่อไหร่ (mûuea-rài)

Explanation:  

เมื่อไหร่ (mûuea-rài) is “when” in Thai. You put the event that you want to know the time of, followed by เมื่อไหร่ (mûue-rài).

Example 1:  
ประชุมเมื่อไหร่
bprà-chum-mûuea-rài
“When is the meeting?”

Example 2:  
เธอจะเริ่มทำงานเมื่อไหร่
thooe-jà-rôoem-tham-ngan-mûuea-rài
“When will you start working?”

Example 3:  
ตาลจะมาถึงเมื่อไหร่
dtaan-jà-ma-thǔeng-mûuea-rài
“When will Tarn arrive?”

10. Where is…? 

You can now ask for more information and about the time. In this section, we’ll also teach you how to ask about location. This is one of those basic Thai phrases you’ll use all the time! 

Sentence structure:  
Place + อยู่ที่ไหน (yùu-thîi-nǎi)
Place + ไปทางไหน (bpai-thaang-nǎi)

Explanation:  

Both of the structures above are pretty similar to each other, and are used to ask about location. The first one is the Thai translation sentence pattern of “Where is …?”  The other is closer to: “How to go to …?”

Example 1:  
ห้องน้ำอยู่ที่ไหน
hâawng-nám-yùu-thîi-nǎi
Where is the toilet?

Signs for the Restroom

Where is the toilet?

Example 2:  
บ้านของเธออยู่ที่ไหน
bâan-khǎawng-thooe-yùu-thîi-nǎi
“Where is your house?”

Example 3:  
ภูเขาที่สูงที่สุดในไทยอยู่ที่ไหน
phuu-khǎo-thîi-sǔung-thîi-sùt-nai-thai-yùu-thîi-nǎi
“Where is the highest mountain in Thailand?”

Example 4:  
จุดชมวิวไปทางไหน
jùt-chom-wiu-bpai-thaang-nǎi
“How to go to the viewpoint?”

Example 5:  
สถานีตำรวจที่ใกล้ที่สุดไปทางไหน
sà-thǎa-nii-dtam-rùuat-thîi-glâi-thîi-sùt-bpai-thaang-nǎi
“How to go to the nearest police station?”

Example 6:  
ประชาสัมพันธ์ไปทางไหน
bprà-chaa-sǎm-phan-bpai-thaang-nǎi
“How to go to the information center?”

11. Conclusion

The lesson has finally come to an end, and you’ve already learned ten useful Thai sentence patterns for everyday use! We hope they’re not too hard for you, but remember that it may take a while to memorize all of them. Using a variety of Thai sentence patterns in daily conversations will help you get familiar with them; eventually, you’ll be able to use them with great fluency.  

Are there any specific topics you want to learn about in future articles? Leave us a comment to let us know! If you have no clue what you want to learn next, we have a list of fun lessons for you at ThaiPod101.com, so don’t forget to check it out.  

If you want to know more about sentence structure in Thai, our word order article is a great place to expand your knowledge. However, if that’s too serious a lesson for you, what about listening to a conversation about Thai tea and a date? Our lesson about ordering food at restaurants is also an interesting choice.

Happy learning!

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List of Thai Adverbs You Must Know

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Like in English, both adverbs and adjectives in Thai are quite important. Thai adjectives and adverbs are used to convey a more detailed message in speech and writing. They can also help you sound like a true native speaker. We’ve already published an article about Thai adjectives, so now it’s time to learn about adverbs in Thai.

In this lesson, you’ll learn about adverbs in Thai grammar, including proper adverb usage in Thai and a list of the most common Thai adverbs. Let’s begin our lesson.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Useful Verbs in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Basic Information About Thai Adverbs
  2. Thai Adverbs of Time
  3. Thai Adverbs of Frequency
  4. Thai Adverbs of Place
  5. Thai Adverbs of Manner
  6. Thai Adverbs of Degree
  7. Conclusion

1. Basic Information About Thai Adverbs

Top Verbs

Before we get ahead of ourselves, it’s important to know a little bit about Thai language adverbs. To start with the very basics, คำวิเศษณ์ (kham-ví-sèet) means “adverb” in Thai. However, คำวิเศษณ์ (kham-ví-sèet) is not exactly the same as adverbs in English. It’s just the Thai grammatical term that’s the most similar to adverbs in English.

คำวิเศษณ์ (kham-ví-sèet) refers to words that are used to modify nouns, pronouns, verbs, as well as adverbs. If compared to English, คำวิเศษณ์ (kham-ví-sèet) is like a combination of adverbs and adjectives in Thai. Still, learning both adverbs and adjectives may confuse you, so this lesson will focus solely on adverbs.

Now that you know the definition of an adverb in Thai, the next thing you should know is how to use adverbs in Thai sentences. There’s no clear structure of where you should put adverbs, meaning that the placement of adverbs in each group is different. But don’t worry, we’ll explain word order for each adverb, one by one, in the following sections.

One last note: If you’re looking for a way to identify adverbs in sentences, there’s some bad news. Unlike in English, there’s no clear way to distinguish adverbs from other words. So this lesson focuses mainly on vocabulary, as opposed to a set of rules for Thai adverbs.

In the following section, we’ll teach you Thai language adverbs that you should know, categorized into different groups for easy understanding.

2. Thai Adverbs of Time

1 – Today 

Thai adverb: วันนี้ (wan-níi)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example:  

พ่อเดินทางไปทำงานที่ชลบุรีวันนี้

phâaw-dooen-thaang-bpai-tham-ngaan-thîi-chon-bù-rii-wan-níi

“Dad goes to work at Chonburi today.”

2 – Tomorrow 

Thai adverbs: วันพรุ่งนี้ (wan-phrûng-níi); พรุ่งนี้ (phrûng-níi)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

พยากรณ์อากาศบอกว่าอากาศจะแจ่มใสในวันพรุ่งนี้

phá-yaa-gaawn-aa-gàat-bàawk-wâa-aa-gàat-jà-jàaem-sǎi-nai-wan-phrûng-níi

“The weather forecast states that it will be sunny tomorrow.”

Example 2:  

พรุ่งนี้ เธอจะไปไหนเหรอ

phrûng-níi thooe-jà-bpai-nhǎi-rhǒoe

“Where will you go tomorrow?”

Additional note: วันพรุ่งนี้ (wan-phrûng-níi) and พรุ่งนี้ (phrûng-níi) have the same meaning and can substitute one another perfectly. Actually, พรุ่งนี้ (phrûng-níi) is a shortened version of วันพรุ่งนี้ (wan-phrûng-níi), so วันพรุ่งนี้ (wan-phrûng-níi) is a little bit more formal.

3 – The day after tomorrow 

Thai adverb: วันมะรืน (wan-má-ruuen)

Placement in sentence:  It is often in the beginning or the end of sentences.

Example:  ผลสอบจะออกวันมะรืนนี้

  • phǒn-sàawp-jà-àawk-wan-má-ruuen-níi
  • The test result will be announced the day after tomorrow.

4 – Yesterday 

Thai adverb:  เมื่อวาน (mûuea-waan)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example:  

เมื่อวาน น้ำท่วมที่ขอนแก่นเพราะฝนตกหนัก

mûuea-waan nám-thûuam-thîi-khǎawn-gàaen-phráo-fǒn-dtòk-nàk-mâak

“There was a flood at Khongaen yesterday because of heavy rain.”

5 – Last ___ (day / week / month / year)

Thai adverb: …ที่แล้ว (…thîi-láaeo)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

How to use: You either put the name of the day, or put the word “week,” “month,” or “year,” before ที่แล้ว (thîi-láaeo).

Example:  

วันจันทร์ที่แล้ว ฉันไปเยี่ยมคุณยายที่ลพบุรี

wan-jan-thîi-láaeo chǎn-bpai-yîiam-khun-yaai-thîi-lóp-bù-rii

“I visited my grandmother at Lopburi last Monday.”

Additional note

6 – This ___ (day / week / month / year)

Thai adverb: …นี้ (…níi)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

How to use: You either put the name of the day, or the word “week,” “month,” or “year” before นี้ (níi).

Example:  

ฉันจะลดน้ำหนักให้ได้ 2 กิโลกรัมในเดือนนี้ 

chǎn-jà-lót-nám-nàk-hâi-dâi-sǎawng-gì-loo-nai-duuean-níi

“I will lose 2 kilograms within this month.”

7 – Next ___ (day / week / month / year)

Thai adverb: …หน้า (…nâa)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

How to use: You either put the name of the day, or the word “week,” “month,” or “year,” before หน้า (nâa).

Example:  

ปีหน้า แม่จะอายุ 57 ปีแล้ว

bpii-nâa mâae-jà-aa-yú-hâa-sìp-jèt-bpii-láaeo

“Next year, Mom will be 57 years old.”

8 – In the morning

Thai adverbs: ตอนเช้า (dtaawn-cháo); ช่วงเช้า (chûuang-cháo)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

ตอนเช้า ในสวนอากาศดีมาก

dtaawn-cháao nai-sǔuan-aa-gàat-dii-mâak

“The weather in the garden is very good in the morning.”

Example 2:  

พ่ออ่านหนังสือพิมพ์ช่วงเช้า

phâaw-àan-nǎng-sǔue-phim-chûuang-cháo

“Dad reads the newspaper in the morning.”

Additional note: ตอนเช้า (dtaawn-cháo) is slightly different from ช่วงเช้า (chûuang-cháo). ตอนเช้า (dtaawn-cháo) refers to a specific time in the morning, while ช่วงเช้า (chûuang-cháo) refers to the morning period.

9 – In late morning

Thai adverbs: ตอนสาย (dtaawn-sǎai); ช่วงสาย (chûuang-sǎai)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

เดี๋ยวเราค่อยออกไปข้างนอกตอนสาย ๆ

dǐiao-rao-khâauy-àawk-bpai-khâang-nâawk-dtaawn-sǎi-sǎi

“We should go out in the late morning.”

Example 2

ช่วงสาย ๆ หน้าบ้านรถติดมาก

chûuang-sǎi-sǎi nhâa-bâan-rót-dtìt-mâak

“The traffic in front of my house is very bad in the late morning.”

Additional note:  ตอนสาย (dtaawn-sǎai) is slightly different from ช่วงสาย (chûuang-sǎai). ตอนสาย (dtaawn-sǎai) refers to a specific time in the late morning, while ช่วงสาย (chûuang-sǎai) refers to the late morning period.

10 – At noon

Thai adverbs: ตอนเที่ยง (dtaawn-thîiang); ช่วงเที่ยง (chûuang-thîiang)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

ท้องฉันร้องตอนเที่ยง

tháawng-chǎn-ráawng-dtaawn-thîiang

“My stomach rumbles at noon.”

Example 2:  

ช่วงเที่ยง โรงอาหารคนแน่นมาก

chûuang-thîiang roong-aa-hǎan-khon-nâaen-mâak

“The canteen is very crowded at noon.”

Additional note: ตอนเที่ยง (dtaawn-thîiang) is slightly different from ช่วงเที่ยง (chûuang-thîiang). ตอนเที่ยง (dtaawn-thîiang) refers to a specific time from noon to one, while ช่วงเที่ยง (chûuang-thîiang) refers to the entire period of time between noon and one.

11 – In the afternoon 

Thai adverbs: ตอนบ่าย (dtaawn-bàai); ช่วงบ่าย (chûuang-bàai)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

พอกินข้าวเที่ยงแล้ว ฉันก็อยากจะนอนพักตอนบ่าย

phaaw-gin-khâo-thîiang-láaeo chǎn-gâaw-yàak-naawn-phák-dtaawn-bàai

“After having lunch, I want to take a nap in the afternoon.”

Example 2:  

ช่วงบ่าย นลินมีประชุม 

chûuang-bàai-ná-lin-mii-bprà-chum

“Nalin has a meeting in the afternoon.”

Additional note: ตอนบ่าย (dtaawn-bàai) is slightly different from ช่วงบ่าย (chûuang-bàai). ตอนบ่าย (dtaawn-bàai) refers to a specific time in the afternoon, while ช่วงบ่าย (chûuang-bàai) refers to the afternoon period.

12 – In the evening

Thai adverbs: ตอนเย็น (dtaawn-yen); ช่วงเย็น (chûuang-yen)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

ตอนเย็นนี้ กานดามีนัดกับแฟน

dtaawn-yen-níi gaan-daa-mii-nát-gàp-faaen

“Ganda has a date with her boyfriend this evening.”

Example 2:  

ช่วงเย็น ฉันไปวิ่งกับเพื่อนบ่อย ๆ

chûuang-yen chǎn-bpai-wîng-gàp-phûuean-bàauy-bàauy

“I often go jogging with my friend in the evening.”

Additional note: ตอนเย็น (dtaawn-yen) is slightly different from ช่วงเย็น (chûuang-yen). ตอนเย็น (dtaawn-yen) refers to a specific time in the evening, while ช่วงเย็น (chûuang-yen) refers to the evening period.

13 – During the day 

Thai adverb: ตอนกลางวัน (dtaawn-glaang-wan)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example:  

ตอนกลางวัน ไม่มีใครอยากออกไปข้างนอกเลยเพราะอากาศร้อนมาก ๆ

dtaawn-glaang-wan mâi-mii-khrai-yàak-àawk-bpai-khâang-nâawk-looei-phráo-aa-gàat-ráawn-mâak

“No one wants to go out during the day because the weather is very hot.”

14 – At night 

Thai adverb: ตอนกลางคืน (dtaawn-glaang-khuuen)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example:  

อย่าออกไปไหนคนเดียวตอนกลางคืน มันอันตราย

yàa-àawk-bpai-nhǎi-dtaawn-glaang-khuuen-khon-diiao man-an-dtà-raai

“Don’t go out alone at night. It is dangerous.”

15 – Soon 

Thai adverb: เร็ว ๆ นี้ (reo-reo-níi)

Placement in sentence: It comes at the end of a sentence.

Example:  

ฉันจะไปเยี่ยมเธอเร็ว ๆ นี้

chǎn-ja-bpai-yîiam-thooe-reo-reo-níi

“I will visit you soon.”

16 – At first 

Thai adverb: ตอนแรก (dtaawn-râaek)

Placement in sentence: It comes at the beginning of a sentence.

Example:  

ตอนแรก ฉันไม่ชอบกินมะม่วงสุกเลย

dtaawn-râaek chǎn-mâi-châawp-gin-má-mûuang-sùk-looei

“I didn’t like to eat ripe mango at first.”

17 – Last 

Thai adverb: สุดท้าย (sùt-tháai)

Placement in sentence: It comes at the beginning of a sentence.

Example:  

สุดท้าย เธอก็ทำสำเร็จ

sùt-tháai thooe-gâaw-tham-sǎm-rèt

“You finally did it at last.”

18 – Before / Prior

Thai adverb: ก่อน… (gàawn…)

Placement in sentence: A phrase with ก่อน… (gàawn…) can be at either the beginning or the end of a sentence.

How to use: Like in English, you put the event that happens later after ก่อน (gàawn). 

Example:  

ก่อนกินข้าวเที่ยง อย่าลืมกินยา

gàawn-gin-khâao-thîiang yàa-luuem-gin-yaa

“Don’t forget to take the pill before lunch.”

19 – After

Thai adverb: หลัง… (lǎng…)

Placement in sentence: A phrase with หลัง… (lǎng…) can be at either the beginning or the end of a sentence.

How to use: Like in English, you put the event that happens first after หลัง (lǎng).

Example:  

โทรหาเจ้านายหลังประชุมเสร็จด้วย

thoo-hǎa-jâo-naai-lǎng-bprà-chum-sèt-dûuai

“Call the boss after the meeting is over.”

20 – Now 

Thai adverb: ตอนนี้ (dtaawn-nii)

Placement in sentence: It’s often at the beginning or the end of a sentence.

Example:  

ตอนนี้เธออายุเท่าไหร่

dtaawn-níi-thooe-aa-yú-thâo-rài

“How old are you now?”

21 – Right now 

Thai adverb: เดี๋ยวนี้ (dǐiao-níi)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the end of a sentence.

Example:  

ไปหยิบมาเดี๋ยวนี้

bpai-yìp-maa-dǐiao-níi

“Go get it right now.”

22 – Currently

Thai adverb: ปัจจุบันนี้ (bpàt-jù-ban-níi)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the beginning of a sentence.

Example:  

ปัจจุบันนี้ ประเทศไทยมีปัญหาเรื่องมลพิษทางอากาศ

bpàt-jù-ban-níi bprà-thêt-thai-mii-bpan-hǎa-rûueang-mon-lá-phít-thang-aa-gàat

“Currently, Thailand has an air pollution problem.”

23 – Recently 

Thai adverb: ช่วงนี้ (chûuang-níi)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the beginning of a sentence.

Example:  

ช่วงนี้ เศรษฐกิจไม่ดีเลย

chûuang-níi sèt-thà-gìt-mâi-dii-looei

“Recently, the economy is bad.”

24 – Previously 

Thai adverb: ก่อนหน้านี้ (gàawn-nâa-níi)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the beginning of a sentence.

Example:  

ก่อนหน้านี้ ธุรกิจที่บ้านดีมาก

gàawn-nâa-níi thú-rá-gìt-thîi-bâan-dii-mâak

“Previously, our family business was doing very well.”

3. Thai Adverbs of Frequency 

More Essential Verbs

1 – Never 

Thai adverb: ไม่เคย (mâi-khooei)

Placement in sentence: It’s put between the subject and the verb.

Example:  

ฉันไม่เคยสูบบุหรี่

chǎn-mâi-khooei-sùup-bù-rìi

“I have never smoked before.”

Woman Breaking a Cigarette

I have never smoked before.

2 – Rarely / Seldomly 

Thai adverbs: แทบจะไม่ (thâaep-jà-mâi); นาน ๆ ครั้ง (naan-naan-khráng); ไม่ค่อยได้ (mâi-khâauy-dâi)

Placement in sentence: แทบจะไม่เคย (thâaep-jà-mâi) and ไม่ค่อยได้ (mâi-khâauy-dâi) are put between the subject and the verb. นาน ๆ ครั้ง (naan-naan-khráng) is put either at the beginning or at the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

สมิทธ์ทำงานหนักมาก เขาแทบจะไม่ได้ออกกำลังกายเลย

sà-mít-tham-ngaan-nàk-mâak khǎo-thâaep-jà-mâi-dâi-àawk-gam-lang-gaai-looei

“Smith works really hard. He rarely exercises.”

Example 2:  

นาน ๆ ครั้ง รัตนาจะทำความสะอาดบ้าน

naan-naan-khráng rát-thà-naa-jà-tham-khwaam-sà-àat-bâan

“Rattana seldomly cleans the house.”

Example 3:  

อนันต์สุขภาพไม่ดี เขาไม่ค่อยได้ออกไปไหน

a-nan-sùk-khà-phâap-mâi-dii khǎo-mâi-khâauy-dâi-àawk-bpai-nhǎi

“Anan is not very healthy. He rarely goes out.”

Additional note: แทบจะไม่ (thâaep-jà-mâi), นาน ๆ ครั้ง (naan-naan-khráng), and ไม่ค่อยได้ (mâi-khâauy-dâi) are pretty much the same and can substitute one another.

3 – Sometimes

Thai adverb: บางครั้ง (baang-khráng)

Placement in sentence: It’s put either at the beginning or at the end of a sentence.

Example:  

ฉ้นดื่มไวน์เป็นบางครั้ง

chǎn-dùuem-waai-bpen-baang-khráng

“I sometimes drink wine.”

4 – Often 

Thai adverbs: บ่อย ๆ (bàauybàauy); บ่อยครั้ง (bàauy-khráng)

Placement in sentence: บ่อย ๆ (bàauybàauy) is put at the end of a sentence, while บ่อยครั้ง (bàauy-khráng) can be put either at the beginning or at the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

กนกวรรณมาซื้อของที่ร้านนี้บ่อย ๆ 

gà-nòk-wan-maa-súue-khǎawng-thîi-ráan-níi-bàauybàauy

“Kanokwan often shops from this store.”

Example 2:  

มัดหมี่คิดถึงพ่อและแม่บ่อยครั้ง

mát-mìi-khít-thǔeng-phâaw-láe-mâae-bàauy-khráng

“Matmee often thinks of her dad and her mom.”

Additional note: Despite having the same meaning, บ่อย ๆ (bàauybàauy) and บ่อยครั้ง (bàauy-khráng) are slightly different. บ่อย ๆ (bàauybàauy) can be used in both spoken and written language, while บ่อยครั้ง (bàauy-khráng) is often used in written language but rarely in spoken language.

5 – Usually / Normally

Thai adverbs: ตามปกติ (dtaam-bpòk-gà-thì); โดยปกติ (dooi-bpòk-gà-thì)

Placement in sentence: ตามปกติ (dtaam-bpòk-gà-thì) can be put either at the beginning or at the end of a  sentence, while โดยปกติ (dooi-bpòk-gà-thì) is put at the beginning.

Example 1:  

ตามปกติแล้ว ฉันมักจะตื่นนอนตอน 7 โมง

dtaam-bpòk-gà-thì-láaeo chǎn-mák-jà-dtùuen-naawn-dtaawn-jèt-moong

“Normally, I wake up at 7 a.m.”

Example 2:  

โดยปกติ แม่ไปตลาดอาทิตย์ละ 1 ครั้ง

dooi-bpòk-gà-thì mâae-bpai-dtà-làat-aa-thít-lá-nùeng-khráng

“Mom usually goes to the market once a week.”

Additional note: The meanings of ตามปกติ (dtaam-bpòk-gà-thì) and โดยปกติ (dooi-bpòk-gà-thì) are pretty much the same. However, โดยปกติ (dooi-bpòk-gà-thì) sounds a little more formal than ตามปกติ (dtaam-bpòk-gà-thì).

6 – Always 

Thai adverb: เสมอ (sà-mǒoe)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the end of a sentence.

Example:  

ฉ้นคิดถึงเธอเสมอ

chǎn-khít-thǔeng-thooe-sà-mǒoe

“I always think of you.”

Additional note: Apart from meaning “always,” เสมอ (sà-mǒoe) can also mean “draw” or “tie.” 

7 – All the time

Thai adverb: ตลอดเวลา (dtà-làawt-wee-laa)

Placement in sentence: It’s put either at the beginning or at the end of a sentence.

Example:  

ตอนพัก แก้วคุยโทรศัพท์ตลอดเวลา

dtaawn-phák gâao-khui-thoo-rá-sàp-dtà-làawt-wee-laa

“Kaew is on the phone during the break all the time.”

8 – Hourly 

Thai adverb: ทุกชั่วโมง (thúk-chûua-moong)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the end of a sentence.

Example:  

กฤษฎาเช็คอีเมลทุกชั่วโมง

grìt-sà-daa-chék-ii-meeo-thúk-chûua-moong

“Kritsada checks his email hourly.”

9 – Daily 

Thai adverb: ทุกวัน (thúk-wan)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the end of a sentence.

Example:  

มินท์ออกกำลังกายทุกวัน

mín-àawk-gam-lang-gaai-thúk-wan

“Mint exercises daily.”

A Woman Doing a Yoga Pose

Mint exercises daily.

10 – Weekly 

Thai adverbs: ทุกสัปดาห์ (thúk-sàp-daa); ทุกอาทิตย์ (thúk-aa-thít)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

เขาอ่านหนังสือ 1 เล่มทุกสัปดาห์

khǎo-àan-nǎng-sǔue-nùeng-lêm-thúk-sàp-daa

“He reads a book weekly.”

Example 2:  

สิงห์เตะบอลทุกอาทิตย์

sǐng-dtè-baawn-thúk-aa-thít

“Singh plays football weekly.”

Additional note: ทุกสัปดาห์ (thúk-sàp-daa) and ทุกอาทิตย์ (thúk-aa-thít) have the same meaning and can substitute one another. However, since สัปดาห์ (sàp-daa) is more formal than อาทิตย์ (aa-thít), you can also guess that ทุกสัปดาห์ (thúk-sàp-daa) is more formal than ทุกอาทิตย์ (thúk-aa-thít) as well.

11 – Monthly 

Thai adverb: ทุกเดือน (thúk-duuean)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the end of a sentence.

Example:  

แม่ไปเยี่ยมยายทุกเดือน

mâae-bpai-yîiam-yaai-thúk-duuean

“Mom visits Grandma monthly.”

12 – Quarterly 

Thai adverbs: ทุกไตรมาส (thúk-dtrai-mâat); ทุก 3 เดือน (thúk-sǎam-duuean)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the end of a sentence.

Example 1:  

ธำรงต้องเขียนรายงานทางเศรษฐกิจทุกไตรมาส

tham-rong-dtâawng-khǐian-raai-ngaan-thaang-sèt-thà-gìt-thúk-dtrai-mâat

“Thamrong has to write an economic report quarterly.”

Example 2:  

แม่ทำความสะอาดบ้านครั้งใหญ่ทุก 3 เดือน

mâae-tham-khwǎam-sà-àat-bâan-khráng-yài-thúk-sǎam-duuean

“Mom deeply cleans the house quarterly.”

Additional note: ทุกไตรมาส (thúk-dtrai-mâat) and ทุก 3 เดือน (thúk-sǎam-duuean) have the same meaning and can substitute one another. However, ทุกไตรมาส (thúk-dtrai-mâat) is more formal than ทุก 3 เดือน (thúk-sǎam-duuean).  ทุกไตรมาส (thúk-dtrai-mâat) is often used in news or formal reports.

13 – Annually

Thai adverb: ทุกปี (thúk-bpii)

Placement in sentence: It’s put at the end of a sentence.

Example:  

ตั้มตรวจสุขภาพทุกปี

dtûm-dtrùuat-sùk-khà-phâap-thúk-bpii

“Tum has his health check-up every year.”

4. Thai Adverbs of Place 

1 – Here

Thai adverbs: ที่นี่ (thîi-nîi); ตรงนี้ (dtrong-níi)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put at the end of a sentence, or after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be”  in Thai.

Example 1:  

ฉันจะรอเธออยู่ตรงนี้

chǎn-jà-raaw-thooe-yùu-dtrong-níi

“I will wait for you here.”

Example 2:  

เธอมาทำอะไรที่นี่

thooe-maa-tham-à-rai-thîi-nîi

“What are you doing here?”

Additional note: ที่นี่ (thîi-nîi) and ตรงนี้ (dtrong-níi) have very similar meanings and can substitute one another.  However, ตรงนี้ (dtrong-níi) refers to a small area around the speaker, while ที่นี่ (thîi-nîi) refers to a wider area around the speaker.

2 – There 

Thai adverbs: ที่นั่น (thîi-nân); ตรงนั้น (dtrong-nán)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put at the end of a sentence, or after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example 1:  

อีก 5 นาทีน้ำจะไปถึงที่นั่น

ìik-hâa-naa-thii-nám-jà-bpai-thǔeng-thîi-nân

“Nam will be there in 5 minutes.”

Example 2:  

กระเป๋าของเธออยู่ตรงนั้น

grà-bpǎo-khǎawng-thooe-yùu-dtrong-nán

“Your bag is there.”

Additional note: ที่นั่น (thîi-nân) and ตรงนั้น (dtrong-nán) have very similar meanings and can substitute one another. However, ที่นั่น (thîi-nân) refers to a small area around the person you’re talking to, while ที่นี่ (thîi-nîi) refers to a wider area around the person you’re talking to.

3 – Over there

Thai adverbs: ที่นู่น (thîi-nûun); ตรงนู้น (dtrong-núun)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put at the end of a sentence, or after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example 1:  

ตอนไปเที่ยวกระบี่ ฉันชอบอากาศที่นู่น

dtaawn-bpai-thîio-grà-bìi chǎn-châawp-aa-gàat-thîi-nûun

“When I travel to Krabi, I like the weather over there.”

Example 2

อย่าไปตรงนู้น คนเยอะมากเกินไป

yàa-bpai-dtrong-núun khon-yóe-mâak-gooen-bpai

“Don’t go over there. It is too crowded.”

Additional note: ที่นู่น (thîi-nûun) and ตรงนู้น (dtrong-núun) have very similar meanings and can substitute one another. However, ที่นู่น (thîi-nûun) refers to a small area of the place you’re talking about, while ที่นี่ (thîi-nîi) refers to a wider area of the place you’re talking about.

4 – Everywhere 

Thai adverb: ทุกที่ (thúk-thîi)

Placement in sentence: It has no certain placement in a sentence.

Example:  

คุณไม่สามารถเดินทางไปทุกที่ได้ด้วยการเดิน

khun-mâi-sǎa-mâat-dooen-thaang-bpai-thúk-thîi-dâi-dûuai-gaan-dooen

“You can’t travel everywhere by walking.”

5 – Inside 

Thai adverbs: ข้างใน (khâang-nai); ด้านใน (dâan-nai)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example 1:  

นักเรียน 5 คนอยู่ข้างในห้องสมุด

nák-riian-hâa-khon-yùu-khâang-nai-hâawng-sà-mùt

“There are 5 students inside the library.”

Example 2:  

เชิญรอด้านในเลยค่ะ

chooen-raaw-dâan-nai-looei-khà

“Please wait inside.”

Additional note: ข้างใน (khâang-nai) and ด้านใน (dâan-nai) have very similar meanings and can substitute one another.  

6 – Outside 

Thai adverbs: ข้างนอก (khâang-nâawk); ด้านนอก (dâan-nâawk)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example 1:  

ใครเดินอยู่ข้างนอกบ้าน

khrai-dooen-yùu-khâang-nâawk-bâan

“Who is walking outside the house?”

Example 2:  

ฉันจะรอเธออยู่ด้านนอก

chǎn-jà-raaw-thooe-yùu-dâan-nâawk

“I will wait for you outside.”

Additional note: ข้างนอก (khâang-nâawk) and ด้านนอก (dâan-nâawk) have very similar meanings and can substitute one another.  

7 – Up / Upstairs

Thai adverb: ข้างบน (khâang-bon)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example:  

ห้องทำงานอยู่ข้างบน

hâawng-tham-ngaan-yùu-khâang-bon

“The office is upstairs.”

8 – Down / Downstairs

Thai adverb: ข้างล่าง (khâang-laang)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example:  

ฉันควรขึ้นไปอยู่ข้างบนหรือลงไปอยู่ข้างล่าง

chǎn-khuuan-khûen-bpai-yùu-khâang-bon-rǔue-long-bpai-yùu-khâang-lâang

“Should I go up or go down?”

9 – Left 

Thai adverbs: ข้างซ้าย (khâang-sáai); ด้านซ้าย (dâan-sáai)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example 1:  

โรงพยาบาลอยู่ด้านซ้ายของเธอ

roong-phá-yaa-baan-yùu-dâan-sáai-khǎawng-thooe

“The hospital is on your left.”

Example 2:  

ช่วยทำความสะอาดโต๊ะที่อยู่ด้านซ้ายของเธอที

chûuay-tham-khwaam-sà-àat-dtó-thîi-yùu-dâan-sáai-khǎawng-thooe-thii

“Please clean the table on your left.”

Additional note: ข้างซ้าย (khâang-sáai) and ด้านซ้าย (dâan-sáai) have very similar meanings and can substitute one another.  

10 – Right 

Thai adverbs: ข้างขวา (khâang-khwǎa); ด้านขวา (dâan-khwǎa)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example 1:  

เดินไปเรื่อย ๆ จะเจอห้องน้ำอยู่ข้างขวา

dooen-bpai-rûueai-rûueai-ja-jooe-hâawng-nám-yùu-khâang-khwǎa

“Keep walking and you will find the toilet on your right.”

Example 2:  

หยิบขวดที่อยู่ด้านขวาให้หน่อย

yhìp-khùuat-thîi-yùu-dâan-khwǎa-hâi-nhòi

“Bring me the bottle on the right.”

Additional note: ข้างขวา (khâang-khwǎa) and ด้านขวา (dâan-khwǎa) have very similar meanings and can substitute one another.  

11 – Behind 

Thai adverbs: ข้างหลัง (khâang-lǎng); ด้านหลัง (dâan-lǎng)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example 1:  

ใครนั่งอยู่ด้านหลังปริม

khrai-nâng-yùu-dâan-lǎng-bprim

“Who is sitting behind Prim?”

Example 2:  

ฉันยืนอยู่ข้างหลังเธอ อย่าถอยมานะ

chǎn-yuuen-yùu-khâang-lǎng-thooe yàa-thǎauy-maa-ná

“I’m standing right behind you. Don’t step back.”

Additional note: ข้างหลัง (khâang-lǎng) and ด้านหลัง (dâan-lǎng) have very similar meanings and can substitute one another.  

12 – In front 

Thai adverbs: ข้างหน้า (khâang-lǎng); ด้านหน้า (dâan-lǎng)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example 1:  

กล่องที่วางอยู่ข้างหน้าห้องเป็นของใคร

glàawng-thîi-waang-yùu-khâang-nâa-hâawng-bpen-khǎawng-khrai

“Who is the owner of the box in front of the room?”

Example 2:  

ต้นไม้ที่อยู่ด้านหน้าพนิตชื่ออะไร

dtôn-mái-thîi-yùu-dâan-nâa-phá-nít-chûue-à-rai

“What is the name of the tree in front of Panit?”

Additional note: ข้างหน้า (khâang-lǎng) and ด้านหน้า (dâan-lǎng) have very similar meanings and can substitute one another.  

13 – Abroad

Thai adverb: ต่างประเทศ (dtàang-bprà-thêet)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after อยู่ (yùu), which is the verb “to be” in Thai.

Example:  

ตอนนี้มานิตเรียนอยู่ต่างประเทศ 

dtaawn-níi-maa-nít-riian-yùu-dtàang-bprà-thêet

“Manit is studying abroad now.”

Additional note: Literally, ต่างประเทศ (dtàang-bprà-thêet) means “different country” in Thai. ต่าง (dtàang) means “different” and ประเทศ (bprà-thêet) means “country.”

5. Thai Adverbs of Manner 

1 – Slowly 

Thai adverb: ช้า (cháa)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

เขาเดินช้า เพราะ เจ็บขา 

khǎo-dooen-cháa phráw-jèb-khǎa

“He walks slowly because his leg hurts.”

2 – Quickly 

Thai adverb: เร็ว (reo)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

ลลิตาหั่นผักได้เร็วมาก

lá-lí-dtaa-hàn-phàk-dâi-reo-mâak

“Lalita can chop vegetables very quickly.”

Woman Chopping a Red Onion

Lalita can chop vegetables very quickly.

3 – Intentionally

Thai adverb: ตั้งใจ (dtâng-jai)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put before the verb.

Example:  

แม่ตั้งใจทำน้ำแกงให้ฉัน

mâae-dtâng-jai-tham-nám-gaaeng-hâi-chǎn

“Mom makes this soup for me intentionally.”

4 – Neatly 

Thai adverb: เรียบร้อย (rîiap-ráauy)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

ช่วยจัดของให้เรียบร้อยด้วยนะ

chûuai-jàt-khǎawng-hâi-rîiap-ráauy-dûuai-ná

“Please arrange things neatly.”

5 – Perfunctorily 

Thai adverbs: ทำ…ให้เสร็จ ๆ ไป (tham-…-hâi-sèt-sèt-bpai); ทำ…ลวก ๆ (tham-…-lûuak-lûuak)

Placement in sentence: The verb is put in the blank.

Example 1:  

เขาทำงานให้มันเสร็จ ๆ ไป ไม่ได้ใส่ใจมาก

khǎo-tham-ngaan-hâi-man-sèt-sèt-bpai mâi-dâi-sài-jai-mâak

“He did the work perfunctorily, didn’t pay much attention.”

Example 2:  

อย่าทำลวก ๆ นะ 

yàa-tham-lûuak-lûuak-ná

“Don’t do this perfunctorily.”

Additional note: ทำให้เสร็จ ๆ ไป (tham-hâi-sèt-sèt-bpai) sounds more formal than ทำลวก ๆ (tham-lûuak-lûuak).  ทำลวก ๆ (tham-lûuak-lûuak) is often used in spoken language.

6 – Diligently 

Thai adverb: อย่างขยันขันแข็ง (yàang-khà-yǎn-khǎn-khǎaeng)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

จรณได้เป็นพนักงานดีเด่นประจำปีเพราะทำงานอย่างขยันขันแข็ง

jà-ron-dâi-bpen-phá-nák-ngaan-dii-dèn-bprà-jam-bpii-phráw-tham-ngaan-yàang-khà-yǎn-khǎn-khǎaeng

“Jaron is the employee of the year because he works diligently.”

7 – Eagerly

Thai adverb: อย่างกระตือรือร้น (yàang-grà-thuue-ruue-rón)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

เขาเตรียมงานแต่งงานอย่างกระตือรือร้น

khǎo-dtriiam-ngaan-dtàaeng-ngaan-yàang-grà-thuue-ruue-rón

“He prepares his wedding eagerly.”

8 – Carefully 

Thai adverb: อย่างระมัดระวัง (yàang-rá-mát-rá-wang)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

บรวิทย์ขับรถอย่างระมัดระวัง เพราะฝนตก

baaw-rá-wít-khàp-rót-yàang-rá-mát-rá-wang-phráw-fǒn-dtòk

“Borawit drives carefully because of the rain.”

9 – Reluctantly 

Thai adverb: อย่างไม่เต็มใจ (yàang-mâi-dtem-jai)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

ข้าวหอมทำตามที่เพื่อนบอกอย่างไม่เต็มใจ

khâao-hǎawm-tham-dtaam-thîi-phûuean-bàawk-yàang-mâi-dtem-jai

“Kaohom reluctantly does as her friend told her.”

10 – Efficiently 

Thai adverb: อย่างมีประสิทธิภาพ (yàang-mii-bprà-sìt-thí-phâap)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

เครื่องจักรตัวใหม่ราคาแพงแต่ทำงานได้อย่างมีประสิทธิภาพ

khrûueng-jàk-dtuua-mài-raa-khaa-phaaeng-dtàae-tham-ngaan-dâi-yàang-mii-bprà-sìt-thí-phâap

“The new machine is expensive but functions efficiently.”

11 – Sarcastically

Thai adverb: อย่างประชดประชัน (yàang-bprà-chót-bprà-chan)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

อย่าพูดจาอย่างประชดประชันกับฉันนะ

yàa-phûut-ja-yàang-bprà-chót-bprà-chan-gàp-chǎn-ná

“Don’t talk sarcastically with me.”

12 – Continuously

Thai adverb: อย่างต่อเนื่อง (yàang-dtàaw-nûueang)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

งามจิตออกกำลังกายอย่างต่อเนื่องมาเป็นเวลา 4 เดือนแล้ว

ngaam-jìt-àawk-gam-lang-gaai-yàang-dtàaw-nûueang-maa-bpen-wee-laa-sìi-duuean-láaeo

“Ngamjit has been exercising continuously for 4 months now.”

13 – Quietly

Thai adverb: เงียบ ๆ (ngîiap-ngîiap)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

ธัญญาชอบอ่านหนังสือเงียบ ๆ 

than-yaa-châawp-àan-nǎng-sǔue-ngîiap-ngîiap

“Thanya likes to read the book quietly.”

Woman Reading a Book at Night

Thanya likes to read the book quietly.

14 – Loudly 

Thai adverb: เสียงดัง (sǐiang-dang)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

ปู่หัวเราะเสียงดัง

bpùu-hǔua-ráw-sǐiang-dang

“Grandpa laughs loudly.”

15 – Softly

Thai adverb: เบา ๆ (bao-bao)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

น้องยังเป็นเด็กทารกอยู่ จับน้องเบา ๆ นะ

náawng-yang-bpen-dèk-thaa-rók-yùu jàp-náawng-bao-bao-ná

“He is still a baby. Touch him softly.”

16 – Happily 

Thai adverb: อย่างมีความสุข (yàang-mii-khwǎam-sùk)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

ศรันย์ร้องเพลงอย่างมีความสุข

sà-ran-ráawng-pleeng-yàang-mii-khwǎam-sùk

“Saran sings the song happily.”

17 – Sadly 

Thai adverb: อย่างเศร้า ๆ (yàang-sâo-sâo)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

เขามองไปที่เธออย่างเศร้า ๆ

khaǒ-maawng-bpai-thîi-thooe-yàang-sâo-sâo

“He looks at her sadly.”

18 – Enjoyably 

Thai adverb: อย่างเพลิดเพลิน (yàang-phlôoet-phlooen)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

ปริญดูหนังเรื่องใหม่อย่างเพลิดเพลิน

bprà-rin-duu-nǎng-rûuang-mài-yàang-phlôoet-phlooen

“Prin watches the new movie enjoyably.”

A Couple Watching a Movie at a Theater

19 – Easily / Simply

Thai adverb: อย่างง่ายดาย (yàang-ngâai-daai)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

พิรุณแก้ปัญหานั้นได้อย่างง่ายดาย

Phí-run-gâae-bpan-hǎa-nán-dâi-yàang-ngâai-daai

“Pirun solved that problem easily.”

20 – Badly 

Thai adverb: ไม่ดี (mâi-dii)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

รายงานของภวัคเขียนมาไม่ดีเลย

raai-ngaan-khǎawng-phá-wák-khǐian-maa-mâi-dii-looei

“Pawak’s report is written badly.”

21 – Well 

Thai adverb: อย่างดี (yàang-dii)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

หนังสือเล่มนี้ถูกเขียนมาอย่างดี

nǎng-sǔue-lêm-níi-thùuk-khǐian-maa-yàang-dii

“This book is written well.”

22 – Angrily 

Thai adverb: อย่างโกรธเคือง (yàang-gròot-khuueng)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after the verb.

Example:  

แม่มองน้องอย่างโกรธเคือง

mâae-maawng-náawng-yàang-gròot-khuueng

“Mom looked at my younger brother angrily.”

6. Thai Adverbs of Degree 

1 – Very / So 

Thai adverbs: มาก (mâak); โคตร (kôot)

Placement in sentence: มาก (mâak) is put after adjectives and adverbs, while โคตร (kôot) is put before adjectives and adverbs.

Example 1:  

เขาวิ่งเร็วมาก

khǎo-wîng-reo-mâak

“He can run very fast.”

Example 2:  

เธอทำอาหารโคตรเก่ง

thooe-tham-aa-hǎan-khôot-gèng

“She cooks very well.”

Additional note: มาก (mâak) and โคตร (khôot) have the same meaning and can substitute one another. However, โคตร (khôot) is viewed as a rude word, so don’t use it in formal conversations.

Woman Taking Something Out of the Oven

She cooks very well.

2 – Rather / Fairly / Quite / Pretty 

Thai adverbs: ค่อนข้าง (khâawn-khâang); พอสมควร (phaaw-sǒm-khuuan)

Placement in sentence: ค่อนข้าง (khâawn-khâang) is put before adjectives and adverbs, while พอสมควร (phaaw-sǒm-kuuan) is put after adjectives and adverbs.

Example 1:  

ตฤณทำงานนี้ได้ค่อนข้างดี

Trin-tham-ngaan-níi-dâi-khâawn-khâang-dii

“Trin did this work pretty well.”

Example 2:  

วรินทร์พูดภาษาอังกฤษได้ดีพอสมควร

Wá-rin-phûut-phaa-sǎa-ang-grìt dâi-dii-phaaw-sǒm-khuuan

“Warin can speak English fairly well.”

Additional note: ค่อนข้าง (khâawn-khâang) and พอสมควร (phaaw-sǒm-khuuan) have the same meaning and can substitute one another. However, พอสมควร (phaaw-sǒm-khuuan) is slightly more formal than ค่อนข้าง (khâawn-khâang).

3 – Too 

Thai adverb: เกินไป (gooen-bpai)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put after adjectives and adverbs.

Example:  

สินธรทำงานหนักเกินไป

sǐn-thaawn-tham-ngaan-nàk-gooen-bpai

“Sintorn works too hard.”

4 – Extremely / Terribly 

Thai adverbs: มาก ๆ (mâak-mâak); โคตร ๆ (khôot-khôot); สุด ๆ (sùt-sùt)

Placement in sentence: มาก ๆ (mâak-mâak), โคตร ๆ (khôot-khôot), and สุด ๆ (sùt-sùt) are all put after adjectives and adverbs.

Example 1:  

เธอทำได้ดีมาก ๆ 

thooe-tham-dâi-dii-mâk-mâk

“You did this extremely well.”

Example 2:  

รถคันนี้วิ่งได้เร็วโคตร ๆ 

Rót-khan-níi-wîng-dâi-reo-khôot-khôot

“This car can go extremely fast.”

Example 3:  

แอนร้องเพลงได้เก่งสุด ๆ

aan-ráawng-pleeng-dâi-gèng-sùt-sùt

“Aan can sing terribly well.”

Additional note: มาก ๆ (mâak-mâak), โคตร ๆ (khôot-khôot), and สุด ๆ (sùt-sùt) have the same meaning and can substitute one another. However, โคตร ๆ (khôot-khôot) is viewed as a rude word which can’t be used in formal conversations, and สุด ๆ (sùt-sùt) is a slang word used among adolescents.

5 – Not very 

Thai adverb: ไม่ค่อย (mâi-kâauy)

Placement in sentence: It’s often put before adjectives and adverbs.

Example

ณภัทรวิ่งไม่ค่อยเร็วเพราะตัวอ้วน

ná-pát-wîng-mâi-khâauy-reo-phráw-dtuua-ûuan

“Napat can’t run very fast because he is fat.”

7. Conclusion

How do you feel about adverbs in Thai after reading this article? Can you remember them all? We know that it takes a lot of work to finish this lesson. We suggest you use these Thai adverbs a lot as practice so you can remember them faster.

Since you’ve learned about adverbs in Thai now, you may want to study Thai adjectives as well. Don’t forget to check out other lessons on ThaiPod101.com as well, such as Huahin, the sea near Bangkok and Top 25 Thai Nouns

Happy Thai learning!

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The Top 100 Thai Verbs You Should Know

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How many actions do you think you do in a day? That number reflects the importance of knowing a language’s verbs for effective communication. 

In this article, you’ll learn 100 Thai verbs that every beginner needs to know. Further, we’ll teach you a little bit about the grammar and usage of these verbs through examples. We believe you’ll be very happy to hear that this is a simple and easy topic!

Is there subject-verb agreement in Thai? What about Thai verb conjugation? The answer to both is a resounding “No!” Thai people use the same form of verbs regardless of the subject.  

Are there Thai verb tenses for present, future, and past? The answer is no. Thai people use the same verb forms regardless of the time.  

So you can see now that this lesson will mainly focus on vocabulary. Basically all you need to worry about is memorizing our Thai verbs list! 
We’ll start this lesson with basic information about Thai verbs, followed by our list of the most useful Thai verbs for beginners. Then, you’ll also get to learn about auxiliary verbs in Thai, and other verbs that are important to know for easy communication.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Useful Verbs in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Basic Information About Thai Verbs
  2. Intransitive Verbs
  3. Transitive Verbs
  4. The Verb “To Be”
  5. Helping Verbs
  6. Conclusion

1. Basic Information About Thai Verbs

Top Verbs

คำกริยา (kham-gà-rí-yaa) is “verb” in Thai. Before we present to you our list of Thai verbs, we thought it would be nice to give you an explanation about verb types in the Thai language, as well as how to use verbs in a sentence.

1- Verb Types 

There are four types of verbs in the Thai language, listed below. A detailed explanation of each type will be explained in the following sections.

2- Thai Verbs in a Sentence

As mentioned above, there’s no change in Thai verb form, so you don’t have to learn about Thai verb conjugation. Still, we’ll give you a basic idea of how verbs are used in Thai sentence structure.

  • Affirmative sentence: subject + verb + object (if any)
  • Negative sentence: subject + ไม่ (mâi) which is “no” in Thai + verb + object (if any)
  • Question: Add a question word to the sentence; no change in verb.

In the following sections, we present to you the most essential Thai verbs with examples. 

2. Intransitive Verbs

More Essential Verbs

อกรรมกริยา (à-gam-gà-rí-yaa) is “intransitive verbs” in Thai. These are verbs that are able to make a sentence complete without the use of an object. Below is a list of Thai intransitive verbs that are often used in daily life.

1- Walk

เดิน (dooen

Example:  

ยายเดินไปตลาดทุกเช้า

yaai-dooen-bpai-dtà-làat-thúk-cháo

“My grandmother walks to the market every morning.”

2- Run 

วิ่ง (wîng

Example:  

เธอวิ่งเพื่อลดความอ้วนทุกวัน

thooe-wîng-phûuea-lót-khwaam-ûuan-thúk-wan

“She runs everyday to lose weight.”

3- Stand 

ยืน (yuuen

Example:  

ฉันยืนรอเธอนานมาก

chǎn-yuuen-raaw-thooe-naan-mâak

“I have been standing here, waiting for you for ages.”

4- Sit 

นั่ง (nâng

Example:  

ตาอายุมากแล้ว พอนั่งนาน ๆ ก็ปวดหลัง

dtaa-aa-yú-mâak-láaew phaaw-nâng-naan-naan-gâaw-bpùuat-lǎng

“My grandpa is quite old. If he sits for a long time, his back hurts.”

5- Jump 

กระโดด (gra-doot

Example:  

พี่ชายฉันขายาว เลยกระโดดได้ไกล

phîi-chaai-chǎn-khǎa-yaao looei-grà-dòot-dâi-glai

“My older brother can jump far because of his long legs.”

6- Fly 

บิน (bin

Example:  

ทำไมนกตัวนั้นบินไม่ได้

tham-mai-nók-dtuua-nán-bin-mâi-dâi

“Why can’t that bird fly?”

7- Kneel

คุกเข่า (khúk-khào

Example:  

เขาคุกเข่าขอแฟนแต่งงาน

Khǎo-khúk-khào-khǎaw-faaen-dtàaeng-ngaan

“He kneeled, then asked his girlfriend to marry him.”

8- Wake up

ตื่นนอน (dtùuen-naawn);  ตื่น (dtùuen)

Example 1:  

วันนี้เธอตื่นนอนกี่โมง

wan-níi-thooe-dtùuen-naawn-gìi-moong

“What time did you wake up today?”

Example 2:  

วันนี้ฉันตื่นสาย

wan-níi-chǎn-dtùuen-sǎai

“Today, I woke up late.”

Additional Note: ตื่นนอน (dtùuen-naawn) and ตื่น (dtùuen) have exactly the same meaning. However, ตื่นนอน (dtùuen-naawn) is a bit more formal than ตื่น (dtùuen).

9- Sleep 

นอน (naawn

Example

เมื่อคืนแม่นอนไม่หลับ

mûuea-khuuen-mâae-naawn-mâi-làp

“Mom couldn’t sleep last night.”

10- Nap 

งีบ (ngîip

Example

ถ้าง่วง ก็งีบสัก 15 นาทีสิ

thâa-ngûuang gâaw-ngîip-sák-sìp-hâa-naa-thii-sì

“If you are sleepy, take a nap for 15 minutes.”

11- Yawn 

หาว (hǎao

Example

ดูท่าทางน้องจะง่วงแล้วนะ หาวไม่หยุดเลย

duu-thâa-thaang-náawng-jà-ngûuang-láaew-ná hǎao-mâi-yhùt-looei

“Looks like she is sleepy; she has been yawning many times for a while now.”

12- Snore 

กรน (gron

Example

พ่อนอนกรนเสียงดัง

phâaw-naawn-gron-sǐiang-dang

“Dad snores loudly.”

13- Sleepwalking 

ละเมอ (lá-mooe

Example

หลานชายของฉันนอนละเมอบ่อย ๆ 

lǎan-chaai-khǎawng-chǎn-naawn-lá-mooe-bàauy-bàauy

“My nephew sleepwalks often.”

14- Dream 

ฝัน (fǎn

Example

เมื่อคืนฉันฝันดีมาก 

mûuea-khuuen-chǎn-fǎn-dii-mâak

“I dreamed very well (had a good dream) last night.”

15- Speak 

พูด (phûut

Example

ช่วยพูดเสียงดัง ๆ หน่อย ฉันไม่ได้ยิน

chûuai-phûut-sǐiang-dang-dang-nàauy chǎn-mâi-dâi-yin

“Please speak loudly, I can’t hear you.”

16- Smile

ยิ้ม (yím

Example

พอยิ้มแล้ว เธอดูน่ารักมาก

phaaw-yím-láaew thooe-duu-nâa-rák-mâak

“You look very pretty when you smile.”

Young Girl Smiling with Sunscreen on Face

17- Laugh

หัวเราะ (hǔa-ráw

Example

หัวเราะอะไรกันอยู่

hǔa-ráw-à-rai-gan-yhùu

“What are you laughing at?”

18- Cry 

ร้องไห้ (ráawng-hâi

Example

เด็กคนนั้นร้องไห้เสียงดังเพราะตุ๊กตาหาย

dèk-khon-nán-ráawng-hâi-sǐiang-dang-phráw-dtúk-gà-dtaa-hǎai

“That child cried loudly because she lost her doll.”

19- Hiccup

สะอึก (sà-ùek

Example

ต้องทำยังไงถึงจะหยุดสะอึก

dtâawng-tham-yang-ngai-thǔng-jà-yhùt-sà-ùek

“What should I do to stop hiccuping?”

20- Sneeze

จาม (jaam

Example

เธอจามไม่หยุดเลย ไม่สบายเหรอ

thooe-jaam-mâi-yhùt-looei mâi-sà-baai-rǒoe

“You have been sneezing, are you sick?”

21- Lie 

โกหก (goo-hok

Example

อย่าโกหกฉันนะ

yhàa-goo-hòk-chǎn-ná

“Don’t lie to me.”

22- Work 

ทำงาน (tham-ngaan

Example

พนักงานใหม่คนนั้นทำงานดีมาก

phá-nák-ngaan-mài-khon-nán-tham-ngaan-dii-mâak

“That new employee works very well.”

23- Take a bath 

อาบน้ำ (àap-nám

Example:  

พออาบน้ำแล้วฉันก็รู้สึกสดชื่น

phaaw-àap-nám-láaew-chǎn-gâaw-rúu-sùek-sòt-chûuen

“I feel fresh after taking a bath.”

24- Shampoo

สระผม (sà-phǒm

Example:  

พ่อสระผมทุกวัน

phâaw-sà-phǒm-thúk-wan

“Dad shampoos his hair everyday.”

25- Fall 

ตก (dtòk

Example:  

แมวตกจากต้นไม้

maaeo-dtòk-jàak-dtôn-mái

“The cat fell from the tree.”

26- Float 

ลอย (laauy

Example:  

ทำไมเรือถึงลอยอยู่กลางน้ำได้

tham-mai-ruuea-thǔeng-laauy-yhùu-glaang-nám-dâi

“Why do ships float on the water?”

27- Swim 

ว่ายน้ำ (wâai-nám

Example:  

เด็ก ๆ ชอบว่ายน้ำ

dèk-dèk-châawp-wâai-nám

“Children like to swim.”

Children Ready to Swim at the Beach

28- Go 

ไป (bpai

Example:  

ลุงออกไปไหนเมื่อเช้านี้

lung-àawk-bpai-nǎi-mûuea-cháo-níi

“Where did Uncle go this morning?”

29- Come

มา (maa

Example:  

มานี่หน่อย  ฉันอยากได้คนช่วย

maa-nîi-nàauy chǎn-yàak-dâi-khon-chûuai

“Come here, I need help.”

30- (Get) Sick

ป่วย (bpùuai

Example:  

อย่าตากฝน เดี๋ยวป่วย

yhàa-dtàak-fǒn dǐiao-bpùuai

“Don’t stay in the rain or you will get sick.”

31- Dance

เต้น (dtên

Example:  

นักร้องคนนั้นเต้นเก่งมาก

nák-ráawng-khon-nán-dtên-gèng-mâak

“That singer dances very well.”

32- Sing

ร้องเพลง (ráawng-pleeng

Example:  

แม่ร้องเพลงไปด้วย ขับรถไปด้วย

mâae-ráawng-pleeng-bpai-dûuai khàp-rót-bpai-dûuai

“Mom sings while driving.”

33- Pay respect

ไหว้ (wâai

Example:  

นักเรียนไหว้คุณครู

nák-riian-wâai-khun-khruu

“The student pays respect to the teacher.”

34- Born

เกิด (gooet

Example:  

เธอเกิดวันอังคาร

thooe-gòoet-wan-ang-khaan

“She was born on Tuesday.”

35- Die

ตาย (dtaai

Example:  

ตาของเขาตายเพราะอุบัติเหตุรถยนต์

dtaa-khǎawng-khǎo-dtaai-phráw-ù-bàt-thì-hèet-rót-yon

“His grandpa died because of a car accident.”

36- Swear 

สาบาน (sǎa-baan

Example:  

เขาสาบานว่าจะไม่โกหกอีก

khǎo-sǎa-baan-wâa-jà-mâi-gaaw-hòk-ìik

“He swears to never lie again.”

37- Greet

ทักทาย (thák-thaai

Example:  

คนไทยทักทายกันโดยการกล่าวสวัสดี

khon-thai-thák-thaai-gan-dooi-gaan-glàao-sà-wàt-dii

Thai people greet each other by saying ‘hello.’”

38- Understand 

เข้าใจ (khâo-jai

Example:  

เธอเข้าใจที่ฉันพูดมั๊ย

thooe-khâo-jai-thîi-chǎn-phûut-mái

“Do you understand what I said?”

39- Breathe 

หายใจ (hǎai-jai

Example:  

กบหายใจใต้น้ำได้มั๊ย

gòp-hǎai-jai-dtâi-nám-dâi-mái

“Can frogs breathe underwater?”

40- Regret 

เสียใจ (sǐia-jai

Example:  

ฉันเสียใจที่ไม่ตั้งใจเรียนภาษาอังกฤษ

chǎn-sǐia-jai-thîi-mâi-dtâng-jai-riian-phaa-sǎa-ang-grìt

“I regret not paying attention in English class.”

41- Bark 

เห่า (hào

Example:  

หมาเห่าเสียงดัง

mhǎa-hào-sǐiang-dang

“The dog barks loudly.”

42- Agree 

เห็นด้วย (hěn-dûuai

Example:  

ฉันเห็นด้วยกับมติการประชุม

chǎn-hěn-dûuai-gàp-má-thì-gaan-bprà-chum

“I agree with the resolution.”

43- Exercise

ออกกำลังกาย (àawk-gam-lang-gaai

Example:  

ปู่ออกกำลังกายทุกวัน เลยสุขภาพดี

bpùu-àawk-gam-lang-gaai-thúk-wan looei-sùk-gà-phâap-dii

“My grandpa exercises everyday, so he is healthy.”

3. Transitive Verbs

สกรรมกริยา (sà-gam-gà-rí-yaa) is “transitive verbs” in Thai. These are verbs that can’t complete a sentence with their meaning alone; the sentence will require an object to be complete. Below is a list of Thai transitive verbs that are often used in everyday life.

44- Eat 

กิน (gin); ทาน (thaan); รับประทาน (ráp-bprà-thaan

Example 1:  

ฉันชอบกินก๋วยเตี๋ยว

chǎn-châawp-gin-gǔuai-dtǐiao

“I like to eat noodles.”

Example 2:  

เธอจะทานอะไร

thooe-jà-thaan-à-rai

“What do you want to eat?”

Example 3:  

เมื่อวานนี้ คุณแม่รับประทานอาหารไทยตอนเย็น

mûuea-waan-níi khun-mâae-ráp-bprà-thaan-aa-hǎan-thai-dtaawn-yen

“Yesterday, my mother ate Thai food in the evening.”

Additional Note: These three words have exactly the same meaning. However, among these three words, รับประทาน (ráp-bprà-thaan) is the most formal one, followed by ทาน (thaan) and กิน (gin), respectively.

45- Drink 

ดื่ม (dùuem

Example:  

ฉันชอบดื่มนมช็อคโกแลต

chǎn-châawp-dùuem-nom-cháawk-goo-láaet

“I like to drink chocolate milk.”

46- Boil 

ต้ม (dtôm

Example:  

เธอกำลังต้มไข่

thooe-gam-lang-dtôm-khài

“She is boiling the egg.”

47- Fry 

ทอด (thâawt

Example:  

เธอต้องรอให้น้ำมันร้อนก่อนทอดไก่

thooe-dtâawng-raaw-hâi-nám-man-ráawn-gàawn-thôot-gài

“You have to wait for the oil to be hot before frying chicken.”

48- Stir fry

ผัด (phàt

Example:  

ผัดผักอย่างไร

phàt-phàk-yàang-rai

“How do you stir fry vegetables?”

Someone Stir Frying Vegetables

49- Heat up 

อุ่น (ùn

Example:  

ช่วยอุ่นนมให้หน่อย

chûuai-ùn-nom-hâi-nàauy

“Could you please heat up the milk?”

50- Chop 

สับ (sàp

Example:  

สับช็อคโกแลตให้เป็นชิ้นเล็ก ๆ

sàp-cháawk-goo-láaet-hâi-bpen-chín-lék-lék

“Chop the chocolate into small pieces.”

51- Slice 

หั่น (hàn

Example:  

แม่หั่นหมูได้บางมาก

mâae-hàn-mǔu-dâi-baang-mâak

“Mom slices pork very thinly.”

52- Peel 

ปอก (bpàawk

Example:  

ช่วยปอกเปลือกแอปเปิ้ลให้หน่อยได้มั๊ย

chûui-bpàawk-plùueak-áap-bpôoen-hâi-nàauy-dâi-mái

“Can you peel the apple for me?”

53- Wash (dishes)

ล้าง (láang

Example:  

วันนี้ใครจะล้างจาน

wan-níi-khrai-jà-láang-jaan

“Who will wash the dishes today?”

54- Wash (cloth) 

ซัก (sák

Example:  

แม่ซักผ้าปูเตียงเมื่อวาน

mâae-sák-phâa-bpuu-dtiiang-mûuea-waan

“Mom washed the bed sheet yesterday.”

55- Hang 

ตาก (dtáak

Example:  

พ่อกำลังตากผ้า

phâaw-gam-lang-dtàak-phâa

“Dad is hanging clothes to dry now.”

56- Iron 

รีด (riit

Example:  

เธอรีดผ้าเก่งมั๊ย

thooe-rîit-phâa-gèng-mái

“Are you good at ironing?”

57- Look 

ดู (duu

Example:  

ดูนี่สิ สวยจัง

duu-nîi-sì sǔuai-jang

“Look at this, so beautiful.”

58- Read

อ่าน (àan

Example:  

พ่ออ่านหนังสือเร็วมาก

phâaw-àan-nǎng-sǔue-reo-mâak

“Dad reads books very fast.”

Old Man Reading the Bible

59- Write

เขียน (khǐian

Example:  

ครูเขียนภาษาญี่ปุ่นเก่ง

khruu-khǐian-phaa-sǎa-yîi-bpùn-khèng

“My teacher is good at writing Japanese.”

60- Type 

พิมพ์ (phim

Example:  

ใครเป็นคนพิมพ์รายงานนี้

khrai-bpen-khon-phim-raai-ngaan-níi

“Who typed this report?”

61- Listen 

ฟัง (fang

Example:  

มุกดาชอบฟังเพลงแจ็ส

múk-daa-châawp-fang-pleeng-jáaet

“Mukda likes listening to jazz music.”

62- Hit 

ตี (dtii

Example:  

ครูไม่ควรตีนักเรียน

khruu-mâi-khuuan-dtii-nák-riian

“Teachers shouldn’t hit students.”

63- Kick 

เตะ (dtè

Example:  

เขาเตะลูกบอลแรงมาก

khǎo-dte-lûuk-baawn-raaeng-mâak

“He hit the ball very hard.”

64- Shave 

โกน (goon

Example:  

พระต้องโกนผม

phrá-dtâawng-goon-phǒm

“Monks have to shave their head.”

65- Blow 

เป่า (bpào

Example:  

ซุปร้อนมาก ต้องเป่าก่อนกิน

súp-ráawn-mâak dtâawng-bpào-gàawn-gin

“The soup is very hot, so blow it before eating.”

66- Do 

ทำ (tham

Example:  

อย่าลืมทำการบ้าน

yhàa-luuem-tham-gaan-bâan

“Don’t forget to do homework.”

67- Wear (clothing) 

ใส่ (sài

Example:  

พรุ่งนี้เธอจะใส่อะไร

phrûng-níi-jà-sài-à-rai

“What do you want to wear tomorrow?”

68- Take off 

ถอด (thàawt

Example:  

อย่าลืมถอดผ้ากันเปื้อนออก

yhàa-luuem-thàawt-phâa-gan-bpûuean-àawk

“Don’t forget to take off your apron.”

69- Ride 

ขี่ (khìi

Example:  

ฉันขี่จักรยานไม่เป็น

chǎn-khìi-jàk-gà-yaan-mâi-bpen

“I can’t ride bicycles.”

70- Learn 

เรียน (riian

Example:  

พี่เรียนภาษาจีนทุกวันอาทิตย์

phîi-riian-phaa-sǎa-jiin-thúk-wan-aa-thít

“My older sister learns Chinese every Sunday.”

71- Play 

เล่น (lên

Example:  

ไปเล่นเกมส์กันเถอะ

bpai-lên-geem-gan-thòe

“Let’s play games.”

72- Buy 

ซื้อ (súue

Example:  

แม่ซื้อผักจากตลาดเยอะมาก

mâae-súue-phàk-jàak-dtà-làat-yóe-mâak

“Mom bought a lot of vegetables from the market.”

73- Sell

ขาย (khǎai

Example:  

ฉันเพิ่งขายรถคันเก่าทิ้งไป

chǎn-phôoeng-khǎai-rót-khan-gào-thíng-bpai

“I just sold my old car.”

74- Teach

สอน (sǎawn

Example:  

เธอสอนฉันทำบราวนี่ได้มั๊ย

thooe-sǎawn-chǎn-tham-braao-nîi-dâi-mái

“Can you teach me how to make brownies?”

Brownie Batter in a Big Bowl

75- Open 

เปิด (bpòoet

Example:  

เปิดหน้าต่างให้หน่อย

bpòoet-nâa-dtàang-hâi-nàauy

“Please open the window.”

76- Close

ปิด (bpìt

Example:  

อย่าลืมปิดประตู

yhàa-luuem-bpìt-bprà-dtuu

“Don’t forget to close the door.”

77- Turn on 

เปิด (bpòoet

Example:  

เงียบจังเลย เปิดทีวีหน่อยได้มั๊ย

ngîiap-jang-looei bpòot-thii-vii-nàauy-dâi-mái

“It is so quiet. Can you please turn on the TV?”

78- Turn off

ปิด (bpìt

Example:  

หนาวจัง ปิดแอร์ได้มั๊ย

nǎao-jang bpìt-aae-dâi-mái

“I’m cold. Can I turn off the air conditioner?”

79- Send

ส่ง (sòng

Example:  

ฉันจะส่งเอกสารให้ทางอีเมลนะ

chǎn-jà-sòng-èek-gà-sǎan-hâi-thaang-ii-meeo-ná

“I will send documents to you via email.”

80- Receive

รับ (ráp

Example:  

เธอได้รับอีเมลจากฉันรึเปล่า

thooe-dâi-ráp-ii-meeo-jàak-chǎn-rúe-bplào

“Did you receive my email?”

81- Produce

ผลิต (phà-lìt

Example:  

บริษัทนี้ผลิตรถยนต์

baaw-rí-sàt-níi-phà-lìt-rót-yon

“This company produces cars.”

82- Cut 

ตัด (dtàt

Example:  

ตัดกระดาษให้หน่อยได้มั๊ย

dtàt-grà-dàat-hâi-nàauy-dâi-mái

“Can you cut that paper for me?”

83- Kill 

ฆ่า (khâa

Example:  

ใครฆ่าเด็กคนนั้น

khrai-khâa-dèk-khon-nán

“Who killed that child?”

84- Build

สร้าง (sâang

Example:  

ใครสร้างบ้านหลังนี้

khrai-sâang-bâan-lǎang-níi

“Who built this house?”

85- Lean 

พิง (phing

Example:  

กรุณาอย่ายืนพิงกระจก

gà-rú-naa-yhàa-yuuen-phing-grà-jòk

“Please do not lean on this glass.”

86- Fold 

พับ (pháp

Example:  

พับเสื้อแบบนั้นยังไง

pháp-sûuea-bàaep-nán-yang-ngai

“How do you fold a shirt like that?”

87- Choose 

เลือก (lûueak

Example:  

เธอจะเลือกอันไหน

thooe-jà-lûueak-an-nǎi

“Which one will you choose?”

4. The Verb “To Be” 

Negative Verbs

วิกตรรถกริยา (ví-gà-dtàt-thà-gà-rí-yaa) is the verb “to be” in Thai. To be more specific, it refers to verbs that convey the concept that A is B. Below is a list of Thai “to be” verbs and other verbs that are considered วิกตรรถกริยา (ví-gà-dtàt-thà-gà-rí-yaa).

88-90 – To be

Similar to English, there are three verbs for “to be” in Thai: เป็น (bpen), อยู่ (yhùu), and คือ (kuue).  

  • เป็น (bpen) is used to explain the state or status of the subject, or what the subject is.
  • อยู่ (yhùu) is used to tell the location of the subject.
  • คือ (khuue) is used to explain the state or status of the subject. This is information that the listeners didn’t know before.

Example 1:  

เธอเป็นหมอ

thooe-bpen-mhǎaw

“She is a doctor.”

Example 2:  

ไมโลเป็นหมาพันธุ์ชิวาว่า

mai-loo-bpen-mhǎa-phan-shí-waa-wâa

“Milo is a Chihuahua dog.”

Cute Chihuahua Lying Down

Example 3:  

ของขวัญอยู่บนโต๊ะ

Khǎawng-khwǎn-yhùu-bon-dtóe

“The gift is on the table.”

Example 4:  

ยายอยู่จังหวัดลพบุรี

yaai-yhùu-jang-wàt-lóp-bù-rii

“My grandma is at Lopburi.”

Example 5:  

นี่คืออะไร

nîi-khuue-à-rai

“What is this?”

Example 6:  

นี่คือเครื่องดื่มใหม่ของเรา

nîi-khuue-khrûueang-dùuem-mài-khǎawng-rao

“This is our new drink.”

91- Same as 

เหมือน (mhǔuean

Example:  

สีเสื้อของแม่เหมือนสีเสื้อของฉัน

sǐi-sûuea-khǎawng-mâae-mhǔuean-sǐi-sûuea-khǎawng-chǎn

“The colors of my mother’s t-shirt are the same as mine.”

92- Similar to

คล้าย (kláai

Example:  

ล่อมีลักษณะคล้ายลา แต่ตัวเล็กกว่า

lâaw-mii-lák-sà-nà-khláai-laa dtàae-dtuua-lék-gwàa

“A mule is similar to a donkey, but is smaller.”

93- Equal to

เท่า (thâo

Example:  

หนูตัวนั้นตัวใหญ่มาก ขนาดเกือบเท่าลูกหมา

nǔu-dtuua-nán-dtuua-yhài-mâak khà-nàat-gùueap-thâo-lûuk-mhǎa

“That rat is so big, its size is almost equal to that of a puppy.”

94- As if 

ราวกับ (raao-gàp

Example:  

เธอสวยราวกับนางฟ้า

thooe-sǔuay-raao-gàp-naang-fáa

“She is so beautiful, as if being an angel.”

5. Helping Verbs

กริยานุเคราะห์ (gà-rí-yaa-nú-kráw) is “helping verbs” or “auxiliary verbs” in Thai. Using these is very easy! To put a helping verb in a sentence, you don’t have to change the form of the verb or anything. You just put the helping verb in the right place and that’s it.  Below is a list of Thai auxiliary verbs you should know.

95- Will 

Thai word: จะ (

How to use: จะ () + verb for affirmative sentence; จะ () + ไม่ (mâi) + verb for negative sentence

Example 1:  

ฉันจะไปตลาดน้ำพรุ่งนี้

chǎn-jà-bpai-dtà-làat-nám-phrûng-níi

“I will go to the floating market tomorrow.”

Example 2:  

ฉันจะไม่มาที่นี่อีก

chǎn-jà-mâi-maa-thîi-nîi-ìik

“I will not come back here again.”

Floating Market in Thailand

96- Must

Thai word: ต้อง (dtâawng

How to use: ต้อง (dtâawng) + verb for affirmative sentence; ต้อง (dtâawng) + ไม่ (mâi) + verb for negative sentence

Example 1:  

เธอต้องทำงานให้เสร็จวันนี้

thooe-dtâawng-tham-ngaan-hâi-sèt-wan-níi

“You must finish work today.”

Example 2:  

เด็ก ๆ ต้องไม่พูดคำหยาบ

dèk-dèk-dtâawng-mâi-phûut-kham-yhàap

“Children must not speak rude words.”

97- Should 

Thai word: ควร (khuuan

How to use: ควร (khuuan) + verb for affirmative sentence; ไม่ (mâi) + ควร (khuuan) + verb for negative sentence

Example 1:  

เธอควรใส่กางเกงสีเข้ม ๆ พรุ่งนี้

thooe-khuuan-sài-gaang-geeng-sǐi-khêm-khêm-phrûng-níi

“You should wear dark-colored pants tomorrow.”

Example 2:  

นักเรียนไม่ควรไปโรงเรียนสาย

nák-riian-mâi-khuan-bpai-roong-riian-sǎai

“Students shouldn’t go to school late.”

98- Used to 

Thai word: เคย (khooei)

How to use: เคย (khooei) + verb for affirmative sentence; ไม่ (mâi) + เคย (khooei) + verb for negative sentence

Example 1:  

ฉันเคยขึ้นรถเมล์ไปโรงเรียนด้วยตัวเองทุกวัน

chǎn-khooei-khûn-rót-mee-bpai-roong-riian-dûuai-dtua-eeng-thúk-wan

“I used to go to school by bus everyday by myself.”

Example 2:  

เธอไม่เคยกินอาหารรสเผ็ด

thooe-mâi-khooei-gin-aa-hǎan-rót-phèt

“She isn’t used to spicy food.”

Additional Note: เคย (khooei) can also mean “marine shrimp” in Thai.

She Isn’t Used to Spicy Food.

99- X-ing 

Thai word: กำลัง (gam-lang)

How to use: กำลัง (gam-lang) + verb for affirmative sentence

Explanation: When you put กำลัง (gam-lang) in front of verbs, it’s like you’re changing the sentence from present simple tense to present continuous tense.

Example:  

คุณครูกำลังตรวจการบ้านอยู่

khun-khruu-gam-lang-dtrùuat-gaan-bâan-yhùu

“The teacher is now grading homework.”

Additional Notes

  • Thai people don’t use this helping verb in negative sentences.
  • กำลัง (gam-lang) can also mean “power” in Thai.

100- Passive form of a verb

Thai word: ถูก (thùuk)

How to use: ถูก (thùuk) + verb for affirmative sentence; ไม่ (mâi) + ถูก (thùuk) + verb for negative sentence

Example 1:  

ลุงของฉันถูกหมากัดเมื่อวานนี้

lung-khǎawng-chǎn-thùuk-mhǎa-gàt-mûuea-waan-níi

“My uncle was bitten by a dog yesterday.”

Example 2:  

น้องไม่ถูกแม่ทำโทษ แม้จะทำตัวไม่ดี

náawng-mâi-thùuk-mâae-tham-thôot máae-jà-tham-dtuua-mâi-dii

“My younger sister isn’t punished despite not behaving.”

Additional Note: In addition to being a helping verb, ถูก (thùuk) can also mean “correct” and “cheap” in Thai.

101- Already + verb 

Thai word: แล้ว (láaeo)

How to use: verb + แล้ว (láaeo) for affirmative sentence

Example:  

แม่ทำยำเสร็จแล้ว

mâae-tham-yam-sèt-láaeo

“Mom already finished making spicy salad.”

Additional Note: Thai people don’t use this helping verb in negative sentences.

6. Conclusion

We’re happy to tell you that at this point, you’ve already learned all about basic Thai verbs. What do you think about learning Thai verbs? Was this an easy topic as we told you at the beginning of the lesson, or harder than you expected? Tell us what you think in the comments section!

If you’re in Thailand or becoming more familiar with the Thai language, you’ll be able to memorize and start using these Thai verbs pretty quickly. There are a lot of lessons at ThaiPod101.com to help you master this lesson even faster, such as our Thai verbs page with audio.

And of course, don’t forget to start another new fun Thai lesson at ThaiPod101.com after you finish this one. If you want more information on the parts of speech in Thai, our Thai Nouns, Thai Adjectives, or Thai Pronouns articles may be a good place to start.

Happy Thai learning! 

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Useful Verbs in Thai

Best Guide for Learning Pronouns in Thai

Thumbnail

Ann is learning Thai. Ann wants to be able to speak Thai fluently. So Ann reads Thai books everyday.  

Does this sound weird? That’s because these sentences lack pronouns. Yes, you guessed it correctly, this lesson will teach you about pronouns in the  Thai language and how to use them.  

The pronoun is another basic component of grammar you have to learn if you want to master any language.  Thus, if you’re learning Thai, you’ll need to know Thai pronouns in order to speak like a native.

Before we start learning Thai pronouns, you should know what a pronoun is in the Thai language first.  คำสรรพนาม (kham-sàp-phá-naam) is “pronoun” in Thai. Grammatically, Thai has six types of pronouns. Some of these have English equivalents, while some are totally different. Of course, we’ll be covering all of these Thai language pronouns.

In this article, you’ll get to learn Thai pronouns inside and out. We’ll cover everything you should know about Thai pronouns in each category. These include:

  • Thai personal pronouns
  • Thai possessive pronouns
  • Thai demonstrative pronouns
  • Thai interrogative pronouns
  • Thai indefinite pronouns
  • Thai relative pronouns

We’ve prepared a list of these Thai pronouns with examples, and will also cover the Thai pronoun system. 

Are you ready? Let’s get started.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Thai Personal Pronouns
  2. Thai Demonstrative Pronouns
  3. Thai Interrogative Pronouns
  4. Thai Indefinite Pronouns
  5. Thai Relative Pronouns
  6. วิภาคสรรพนาม
  7. Conclusion

1. Thai Personal Pronouns

Let’s start with Thai personal pronouns, which are called บุรุษสรรพนาม (bù-rùt sàp-phá-naam) in Thai. This part isn’t very hard as the words here are very similar to those in English. The only difference is that in Thai, there are levels of formality, meaning that each English pronoun may have many equivalents in Thai.  

1- Basic information about Thai personal pronouns

  • Thai subject pronouns and Thai object pronouns are the same. You must remember all of these as they’re part of the possessive and reflexive pronouns.
  • Unlike in the English language, there are some subject and object pronouns for “I” and “you” that are gender-specific.
  • For Thai possessive pronouns, the way to remember is: “ของ (khǎawng) + subject/object pronouns.” The usage of this is: “noun + possessive pronoun.”
  • For Thai reflexive pronouns, the way to remember is: “ตัว (dtuua) + subject/object pronouns.” The usage of this is: “ด้วย (dûuai) + reflexive pronoun + เอง (eeng).”

The table below shows the personal pronouns in English and Thai.


Thai subject pronouns
Thai object pronouns
Thai possessive pronounsThai reflexive pronouns
Noun + ของ (khǎawng) + subject/object pronounsด้วย (dûuai) + ตัว (dtuua) + subject/object pronouns + เอง (eeng)
I / Me / My / Myself
ข้าพเจ้า (khâa-phá-jâo)
ดิฉัน (dì-chǎn)
ฉัน (chǎn)
, ผม (phǒm)
กู (guu)
ของข้าพเจ้า (khǎawng khâa-phá-jâo)
ของดิฉัน (khǎawng dì-chǎn)
ของฉัน (khǎawng chǎn)
ของผม (khǎawng phǒm)
ของกู (khǎawng guu)
ตัวข้าพเจ้า (dtuua khâa-phá-jâo)
ตัวดิฉัน (dtuua dì-chǎn)
ตัวฉัน (dtuua chǎn)
ตัวผม (dtuua phǒm)
ตัวกู (dtuua guu)
You / Your / Yourself
ท่าน (thâan)
คุณ (khun)
เธอ (thooe), นาย (naai)
มึง (mueng)
ของท่าน (khǎawng thâan)
ของคุณ (khǎawng khun)
ของเธอ (khǎawng thooe)
ของนาย (khǎawng naai)
ของมึง (khǎawng mueng)
ของท่าน (khǎawng thâan)
ของคุณ (khǎawng khun)
ของเธอ (khǎawng thooe)
ของนาย (khǎawng naai)
ของมึง (khǎawng mueng)
We / Us / Our / Ourselves
เรา (rao)
พวกเรา (phûuak rao)
พวกกู (phûuak guu)
ของเรา (khǎawng rao)
ของพวกเรา (khǎawngphûuak rao)
ของพวกกู (khǎawngphûuak guu)
ตัวเรา (dtuua rao)
ตัวพวกเรา (dtuuaphûuak rao)
ตัวพวกกู (dtuuaphûuak guu)
They / Them / Their / Themselves
พวกท่าน (phûuak thâan)
พวกเขา (phûuak khǎo)
พวกมัน (phûuak man)
ของพวกท่าน (khǎawngphûuak thâan)
ของพวกเขา (khǎawngphûuak khǎo)
ของพวกมัน (khǎawngphûuak man)
ตัวพวกท่าน (dtuuaphûuak thâan)
ตัวพวกเขา (dtuuaphûuak khǎo)
ตัวพวกมัน (dtuuaphûuak man)
He / Him / His / Himself
เขา (khǎo)ของเขา (khǎawng khǎo)ตัวเขา (dtuua khǎo)
She / Her / Herself
เธอ (thooe)
หล่อน (lhàawn)
ของเธอ (khǎawng thooe)
ของหล่อน (khǎawng làawn)
ตัวเธอ (dtuua thooe)
ตัวหล่อน (dtuua làawn)
It / Its / Itself
มัน (man)ของมัน (khǎawng man)ตัวมัน (dtuua man)ดิฉัน (dì-chǎn)
ฉัน (chǎn

* The pronouns in the table above are listed by level of formality. The first/top pronoun in each list is the most formal one, while the last/lowest one is the most informal.

** The pronouns in orange are feminine pronouns in Thai.

*** The pronouns in green are masculine pronouns in Thai.

2- I / Me / My / Myself 

Introducing Yourself

ข้าพเจ้า (khâa-phá-jâo

ข้าพเจ้า (khâa-phá-jâo) is the most formal singular pronoun that means “I” in Thai. It can be used for both males and females. For speaking, Thai people only use this word in very formal situations, such as taking an oath in an important ceremony. However, you can find it a lot in writing, especially in autobiographies.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of ข้าพเจ้า (khâa-phá-jâo), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of ข้าพเจ้า (khâa-phá-jâo), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

เมื่อข้าพเจ้ายังเป็นเด็ก  ข้าพเจ้าพูดอย่างเด็ก

mûuea khâa-phá-jâo yang bpen dèk  khâa-phá-jâo phûut yàang dèk

“When I was a child, I spoke like a child.”

Example 2:  

นั่นคือหนังสือของข้าพเจ้า

nân khuue nǎang-sǔue khǎawng khâa-phá-jâo

“That is my book.”

Example 3:  

ข้าพเจ้าเขียนหนังสือทั้งเล่มนี้ด้วยตัวของข้าพเจ้าเอง

khâa-phá-jâo khǐian nǎng-sǔue tháng lêm níi dûuai dtuua khâawng khâa-phá-jâo eeng

“I wrote the entire book on my own.”

This Is My Book.

ดิฉัน (dì-chǎn)

ดิฉัน (dì-chǎn) is another formal pronoun in Thai. However, it’s not as formal as ข้าพเจ้า (khâa-phá-jâo), and is only used for females. Thai people use this pronoun in formal daily conversations, such as in business-related situations.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of ดิฉัน (dì-chǎn), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of ดิฉัน (dì-chǎn), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

ดิฉันไม่รับข้อเสนอนี้ค่ะ

dì-chǎn mâi ráp khâaw sà-nǒoe níi khâ

“I decline this offer.”

Example 2:  

คุณแม่เพิ่งซักเสื้อของดิฉันไปค่ะ

khun mâae phôoeng sák sûuea khǎawng dì-chan bpai khâ

“My mother just washed my shirt.”

Example 3:  

เดี๋ยวดิฉันจะตรวจสัญญาด้วยตัวดิฉันเองอีกทีค่ะ

dǐiao dì-chǎn jà dtrùuat sǎn-yaa dûuai dtua eeng ìik thii khâ

“I will check the contract by myself again.”

ฉัน (chǎn)

ฉัน (chǎn) is probably the pronoun that females use the most. It can be used in casual and not very formal daily conversations.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of ฉัน (chǎn), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of ฉัน (chǎn), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

ฉันชอบสีเแดงมาก

chǎn châawp sǐi daaeng mâak

“I like the color red a lot.”

Example 2:  

ห้ามจับรูปของฉัน

hâam jàp rûup khǎawng chǎn

“Don’t touch my picture.”

Example 3:  

ฉันทำขนมหวานด้วยตัวฉันเอง

chǎn tham khà-nǒm wǎan dûuai dtuua khǎawng chǎn eeng

“I made this dessert by myself.”

ผม (phǒm)

ผม (phǒm) is a masculine pronoun, and it can be used in both formal situations and casual situations.  

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of ผม (phǒm), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of ผม (phǒm), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

ผมจะไปชะอำพรุ่งนี้

phǒm jà bpai chá-am phrûng-níi

“I will go to Chaam tomorrow.”

Example 2:  

ทีวีของผมเพิ่งเสียไป

thii-wii khǎawng phǒm phôoeng sǐia bpai

“My TV just broke.”

Example 3:  

ผมจะทำด้วยตัวผมเอง

phǒm jà tham dûuai dtuua phǒm eeng

“I will do it by myself.”

กู (guu)

กู (guu) is considered a rude pronoun to use, and you mustn’t use it in formal conversations. Close friends often use this pronoun when talking to each other. It can be used for both males and females.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of กู (guu), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of กู (guu), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

กูไม่ไป

guu mâi bpai

“I won’t go.”

Example 2:  

นี่มันเรื่องของกู  อย่ามายุ่ง

nîi man rûueang khǎawng guu  yàa maa yûng

“This is my business. Don’t stick your nose in.”

Example 3:  

รูปนั้นกูวาดด้วยตัวกูเอง สวยมั๊ย

rûup nán guu wâat dûuai dtuua guu eeng sǔuai mái

“I drew that picture by myself. Is it beautiful?”

3- You / Your / Yourself 

ท่าน (thâan)

ท่าน (thâan) is used with people you respect. Thai people don’t use this pronoun very much in daily life.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of ท่าน (thâan), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of ท่าน (thâan), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

ท่านต้องการอะไร

thâan dtâawng-gaan à-rai

“What do you want?”

Example 2:  

รถของท่านราคาแพงมากมั๊ย

rót khǎawng thâan raa-khaa phaaeng mâak mái

“Is your car very expensive?”

Example 3:  

ท่านทำอาหารให้หลานด้วยตัวท่านเองรึเปล่า

thâan tham aa-hǎan hâi lǎan dûuai dtuua thâan eeng rúe bplào

“Do you cook for your grandchild by yourself?”

คุณ (khun)

คุณ (khun) is used often in daily life. Thai people use this pronoun in formal situations, especially those related to business. 

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of คุณ (khun), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of คุณ (khun), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

คุณอายุเท่าไหร่แล้ว

khun aa-yú thâo-rài láaeo

How old are you?

Example 2:  

ขอดูกระเป๋าของคุณหน่อยค่ะ

khǎaw duu grà-bpǎo khǎawng khun nàauy khâ

“Let me check your bag.”

Example 3:  

คุณหิ้วกล่องนี้ด้วยตัวคุณเองได้มั๊ย

khun hîu glàawng níi dûuai dtuua khun eeng dâi mái

“Can you carry this box by yourself?”

เธอ (thooe)

เธอ (thooe) is used as a feminine pronoun only. It’s often used in casual conversations, or when older people are referring to a woman who’s younger than them.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of เธอ (thooe), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of เธอ (thooe), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

เธอจะกินข้าวเที่ยงด้วยกันมั๊ย

thooe jà gin khâao thîiang dûuai gan mái

“Do you want to have lunch with me?”

Example 2:  

ฉันว่าเสื้อของเธอไม่สวยเลย

chǎn wâa sûuea khǎawng thooe mâi sǔuai looei

“I think your shirt is not beautiful.”

Example 3:  

เธอต้องทำการบ้านด้วยตัวเธอเองนะ

thooe dtâawng tham gaan-baan dûuai dtuua thooe eeng ná

“You have to do homework by yourself.”

นาย (naai

นาย (naai) is used as a masculine pronoun only. It’s often used in casual conversations, or when older people are referring to a man who’s younger than them.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of นาย (naai), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of นาย (naai), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

นายดูเหนื่อย ๆ นะ

naai duu nùueai nùueai ná

“You look tired.”

Example 2:  

การบ้านของนายทำเสร็จรึยัง

gaan-bâan khǎawng naai tham sèt rúe yang

“Have you finished your homework?”

Example 3:  

นายทำรายงานเล่มนี้ด้วยตัวนายเองรึเปล่า

naai tham raai-ngaan lêm níi dûuai dtuua naai eeng rúe bplào

“Did you write this report by yourself?”

มึง (mueng

มึง (mueng) is considered a rude pronoun to use, and you mustn’t use it in formal conversations. Close friends often use this pronoun when talking to each other. It can be used with both males and females.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of มึง (mueng), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of มึง (mueng), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

มึงเดินระวังนะ

mueng dooen rá-wang ná

“You should walk carefully.”

Example 2:  

อันนั้นรถของมึงใช่มั๊ย

an nán rót khǎawng mueng châi mái

“Is that your car?”

Example 3:  

ไหนมึงบอกว่ามึงทำด้วยตัวมึงเองไง

nǎi mueng bàawk wâa mueng tham dûuai dtuua mueng eeng ngai

“You told me you did this by yourself.”

4- We / Us / Our / Ourselves 

เรา (rao) / พวกเรา (phûuak rao

เรา (rao) and พวกเรา (phûuak rao) are pronouns used to refer to a group of people. They can be used in both formal and informal situations. เรา (rao) and พวกเรา (phûuak rao) are pretty much the same and are completely interchangeable. 

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of เรา (rao) or พวกเรา (phûuak rao), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of เรา (rao) or พวกเรา (phûuak rao), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

เรา (พวกเรา)ไม่ต้องการความช่วยเหลือของคุณ

rao (phûuak rao) mâi dtâawng-gaan khwaam chûuai-lǔuea khǎawng khun

“We don’t need your help.”

Example 2:  

นี่คืองานของเรา (พวกเรา)

nîi khuue ngaan khǎawng rao (phûuak rao) 

“This is our job.”

Example 3:  

เราทำสวนนี้ด้วยตัวเรา (พวกเรา)เอง

rao tham sǔuan níi dûuai dtuua khǎawng rao (phûuak rao) eeng

“We do this garden by ourselves.”

Woman Gardening

พวกกู (phûuak guu)

พวกกู (phûuak guu) is another pronoun that’s used to refer to a group of people. However, it’s considered to be impolite, and you mustn’t use this pronoun in formal situations.  

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of พวกกู (phûuak guu), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of พวกกู (phûuak guu), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

พวกกูไม่อยากขายบ้านหลังนี้

phûuak guu mâi yàak khǎai bâan lǎng níi

“We don’t want to sell this house.”

Example 2:  

ร้านนี้คือร้านของพวกกู

ráan níi khuue ráan khǎawng phûuak guu

“This is our shop.”

Example 3:  

พวกกูบริหารร้านนี้ด้วยตัวพวกกูเอง

phûuak guu baaw-rí-hǎan ráan níi dûuai dtuua phûuak guu eeng

“We run this shop by ourselves.”

5- They / Them / Their / Themselves

พวกท่าน (phûuak thâan)

พวกท่าน (phûuak thâan) is a pronoun that’s used to refer to a group of people whom you respect. Thai people normally use this pronoun in formal situations.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of พวกกู (phûuak thâan), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of พวกกู (phûuak thâan), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

พวกท่านได้รับเชิญไปที่ห้องอาหารเวลา 18.00 นาฬิกา

phûuak thâan dâi ráp chooen bpai thîi hâawng aa-hǎan wee-laa sìp bpàaet na-lí-gaa khâ

“They invited you to go to the dining room at six p.m.”

Example 2:  

โต๊ะของพวกท่านอยู่ด้านนู้นค่ะ

dtó khǎawng phûuak thâan yùu dâan núun khâ

“Their table is over there.”

Example 3:  

พวกท่านสามารถกดสั่งอาหารผ่านแทบเล็ตด้วยตัวพวกท่านเองได้

phûuak thâan sǎa-mâat gòt sàng aa-hǎan phàan tháp-lèt dûuai dtuua phûuak thâan eeng dâi

“They can order using this tablet by themselves.”

พวกเขา (phûuak khǎo

พวกเขา (phûuak khǎo) is a pronoun that can be used in situations that are casual or not very formal.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of พวกเขา (phûuak khǎo), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of พวกเขา (phûuak khǎo), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

พวกเขาชอบกีฬาฟุตบอล

phûuak khǎo châawp gii-laa fút-baawn

“They like football.”

Example 2:  

เสื้อทีมของพวกเขาอยู่ที่ไหน

sûuea thiim khǎawng phûuak khǎo yùu thîi nǎi

“Where are their team t-shirts?”

Example 3:  

พวกเขาสามารถฝึกซ้อมด้วยตัวพวกเขาเองได้

phûuak khǎo sǎa-mâat fùek sáawm dûuai dtuua khǎawng phûuak khǎo eeng dâi

“They can practice by themselves.”

พวกมัน (phûuak man)

พวกมัน (phûuak man) is a pronoun that’s used to refer to animals and plants in Thai.  

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of พวกมัน (phûuak man), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of พวกมัน (phûuak man), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

แม่เลี้ยงกระต่ายไว้หลายตัว พวกมันน่ารักมาก

mâae líiang grà-dtàai wái lǎai dtuua phûuak man nâa rák mâak

“Mom has many rabbits. They are very cute.”

Example 2:  

อาหารของพวกมันอยู่ในกล่องนั้น

aa-hǎan khǎawng phûuak man yùu nai glàawng nán

“Their food is in that box.”

Example 3:  

พวกมันหาอาหารกินด้วยตัวของพวกมันเองไม่ได้

phûuak man hǎa aa-hǎan gin dûuai dtuua khǎawng man eeng mâi dâi

“They can’t find food by themselves.”

6- He / Him / His / Himself 

เขา (khǎo)

เขา (khǎo) is a masculine Thai language pronoun. It can be used in both formal and informal situations.  

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of เขา (khǎo), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of เขา (khǎo), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

เขาทำอาหารอร่อยมาก

khǎo tham aa-hǎan à-ràauy mâak

“He is very good at cooking.”

Example 2:  

อาหารของเขามักมีสีสันสวยงาม

aa-hǎan khǎawng khǎo mák mii sǐi-sǎn sǔuai ngaam

“Their food is in that box.”

Example 3:  

เขาสามารถทำอาหารด้วยตัวเขาเองภายใน 10 นาที

khǎo sǎa-mâat tham aa-hǎan dûuai dtuua eeng phaai nai sìp naa-thii

“He can cook by himself within ten minutes.”

7- She / Her / Herself 

เธอ (thooe)

เธอ (thooe) is a common feminine pronoun, and it can be used in both formal and informal situations. 

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of เธอ (thooe), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of เธอ (thooe), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

เธอพูดได้ 3 ภาษา

thooe phûut dâi sǎam phaa-sǎa

“She can speak three languages.”

Example 2:  

สำเนียงของเธอดีมาก

sǎm-niiang khǎawng thooe dii mâak

“Her accent is very good.”

Example 3:  

เธอสามารถไปเที่ยวต่างประเทศด้วยตัวเธอเองได้

thooe sǎa-mâat bpai thîiao dtàang bprà-thêet dûuai dtuua eeng dâi

“She can travel abroad by herself.”

หล่อน (làawn)

หล่อน (làawn) is another feminine pronoun in Thai. However, Thai people don’t use this word much nowadays;  you’re more likely to hear this word in period dramas. Compared to เธอ (thooe), หล่อน (làawn) is more casual.  Thus, this pronoun is used in informal situations.

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of หล่อน (làawn), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of หล่อน (làawn), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

หล่อนกำลังทำอะไรอยู่

làawn gam-lang tham à-rai yùu

“What is she doing now?”

Example 2:  

หล่อนกำลังเลี้ยงลูกของหล่อน

làawn gam-lang líiang lûuk khǎawng làawn

“She is taking care of her baby.”

Example 3:  

หล่อนเลี้ยงลูกด้วยตัวหล่อนเอง  ไม่มีคนช่วย

làawng líiang lûuk dûuai dtuua làawn eeng mâi mii khon chûuai

“She raises her baby by herself with no help from others.”

8- It / Its / Itself 

มัน (man)

มัน (man) is a pronoun that’s used to refer to animals or plants in Thai.  

Once you put ของ (khǎawng) in front of มัน (man), you get a possessive pronoun. And once you put ตัว (dtuua) in front of มัน (man), you get a reflexive pronoun.

Example 1:  

บ้านฉันเลี้ยงสุนัขไว้ 1 ตัว มันแก่มากแล้ว

bâan chǎn líiang sù-nák wái nùeng dtuua man gàae mâak láaeo

“Our family has one dog. It is very old now.”

Example 2:  

บ้านของมันอยู่ในสวน

bâan khǎawng man yùu nai sǔuan

“Its house is in the garden.”

Example 3:  

เพราะมันแก่มากแล้ว  มันเลยทำอะไรด้วยตัวมันเองไม่ได้

phráw man gàae mâak láaeo man looei tham à-rai dûuai dtuua man eeng mâi dâi

“Because it is very old, it can’t do much by itself.”

Girl Hugging Dog

2. Thai Demonstrative Pronouns

Another type of pronoun in Thai is the demonstrative pronoun, which is called นิยมสรรพนาม (ní-yá-má-sàp-phá-naam). Demonstrative pronouns are especially helpful for those just starting to learn Thai. Understanding this aspect of Thai grammar will help you communicate effectively, even if you don’t know the names of certain objects. 

1- This 

Thai pronoun: นี่ (nîi)

Explanation: This pronoun is used to refer to a single noun that’s near the speaker. 

Example:  

นี่คือสินค้าตัวใหม่

nîi khuue sǐn-kháa dtuua mài

“This is a new product.”

2- That 

Thai pronoun: นั่น (nân) / โน่น (nôon)

Explanation: นั่น (nan) is used to refer to a single noun that’s far from the speaker, but close to the listener. โน่น (nôon) is used to refer to a single noun that’s far from both the speaker and the listener.

Example 1:  

นั่นคืออะไร

nân khuue à-rai

“What is that?”

Example 2:  

โน่นคือเสื้อผ้าของแม่

nôon khuue sûuea-phâa khǎawng mâae

“That is Mother’s clothing.”

3- These 

Thai pronoun: พวกนี้ (phûuak níi)

Explanation: This pronoun is used to refer to a plural noun that’s near the speaker.

Example:  

จะให้เอาพวกนี้วางไว้ตรงไหน

jà hâi ao phûuak níi waang wái dtrong nǎi

“Where do you want me to put these?”

4- Those

Thai pronoun: พวกนั้น (phûuak nán) / พวกโน้น (phûuak nóon)

Explanation: พวกนั้น (phûuak nán) is used to refer to a plural noun that’s far from the speaker, but close to the listener. พวกโน้น (phûuak nóon) is used to refer to a plural noun that’s far from both the speaker and the listener.

Example 1:  

คนพวกนั้นมาทำอะไรที่นี่

khon phûuak nán maa tham à-rai thîi nîi

“What are those people doing here?”

Example 2:  

คนพวกโน้นกำลังทำงานอยู่

khon phûuak nóon gam-lang tham ngaan yùu

“Those people are working.”

5- Here 

Thai pronoun: ที่นี่ (thii níi)

Example:  

วางไว้ที่นี่

waang wái thîi nîi

“Put it here.”

6- There

Thai pronoun: ตรงนั้น (dtrong nán) / ตรงโน้น (dtrong nóon)

Explanation: ตรงนั้น (dtrong nán) is used to refer to an area that’s far from the speaker, but close to the listener. ตรงโน้น (dtrong nóon) is used to refer to an area that’s far from both the speaker and the listener.

Example 1:  

ตรงนั้นเกิดอะไรขึ้น

dtrong nán gòoet à-rai khûen

“What is happening there?”

Example 2:  

เธอกำลังซักผ้าอยู่ตรงโน้น

thooe gam-lang sák phâa yhùu dtrong nóon

“She is washing clothes over there.”

3. Thai Interrogative Pronouns

Basic Questions

Thai interrogative pronouns, called ปฤจฉาสรรพนาม (phrùt-chǎa-sàp-phá-naam), are another pronoun type you have to learn about. These are also known as “question words” because they’re most often used when asking questions.

1- Who and Whom

Thai pronoun: ใคร (khrai)

Explanation: ใคร (khrai) is a pronoun that’s used to inquire about a person (or people). ใคร (khrai) can be both a subject and object pronoun.  

Example:  

ใครเป็นคนวาดรูปนี้

khrai bpen khon wâat rûup níi

“Who drew this picture?”

2- Whose 

Thai pronoun: ของใคร (khǎawng khrai)

Explanation: ของใคร (khǎawng khrai) is a pronoun that inquires about the ownership of a certain noun.

Example:  

กระเป๋าใบนี้เป็นของใคร

grà-bpǎo bai níi bpen khǎawng khrai

“Whose bag is this?”

3- What

Thai pronoun: อะไร (à-rai)

Explanation: อะไร (à-rai) is a pronoun that inquires about the name, definition, or description of an object.

Example:  

นี่คืออะไร

nîi khuue à-rai

“What is this?”

4- Which

Thai pronoun: อันไหน (an nǎi) / คนไหน (khon nǎi)

Explanation: อันไหน (an nǎi) is a pronoun that’s used to ask another party to choose one object out of two or more available ones. คนไหน (khon nǎi) is a pronoun that’s used to ask another party to choose one person out of two or more people.

Example 1:  

เธอจะเอาอันไหน

thooe jà ao an nǎi

“Which one do you want?”

Example 2:  

คนไหนจะเป็นคนถูบ้าน เอหรือบี

khon nǎi jà bpen khon thǔu bâan ee rǔue bii

“Which person will mop the house? A or B?”

5- Where

Thai pronoun: ที่ไหน (thîi nǎi)

Explanation: ที่ไหน (thîi nǎi) is a pronoun that inquires about place or location. 

Example

บ้านของเธออยู่ที่ไหน

bâan khǎawng thooe yùu thîi nǎi

“Where is your house?”

6- When 

Thai pronoun: เมื่อไหร่ (mûuea-rài)

Explanation: เมื่อไหร่ (mûuea-rài) is a pronoun that inquires about time.

Example:  

เธอจะมาถึงเมื่อไหร่

thooe jà maa thǔeng mûuea-rài

“When will you arrive?”

7- Why 

Thai pronoun: ทำไม (tham-mai)

Explanation: ทำไม (tham-mai) is a pronoun that’s used to inquire about a reason something happened.

Example:  

เธอซื้อทีวีใหม่ทำไม เครื่องเก่าก็ยังดูได้

thooe súue thii-wii mài tham-mai khrûueang gào gâaw yang chái dâi

“Why did you buy a new TV? Your old one is still fine.”

4. Thai Indefinite Pronouns

อนิยมสรรพนาม (à-ní-yá-má-sàp-phá-naam) is “indefinite pronoun” in Thai. You may notice that some of these pronouns are the same as Thai interrogative pronouns; however, the way to use them is different. These Thai indefinite pronouns are used in declarative sentences, not in questions. 

1- Anyone and Anybody 

Thai pronoun: ใคร (khrai)

Explanation: You can use this as both a subject and object pronoun. It’s used to refer to an unspecified person in a declarative sentence.  

Example:  

ใครก็ทำได้ ง่ายแค่นี้เอง

khrai gâaw tham dâi ngâai khâae níi eeng

“Anyone and anybody can do this, it is this easy.”

2- Anything 

Thai pronoun: อะไร (à-rai)

Explanation: This pronoun is used to refer to an unspecified object in a declarative sentence.  

Example:  

ฉันกินอะไรก็ได้

chǎn gin à-rai gâaw dâi

“I can eat anything.”

3- Anywhere 

Thai pronoun: ที่ไหน (thîi nǎi)

Explanation: It’s used to refer to an unspecified place in a declarative sentence.  

Example:  

ฉันไปเป็นผู้ใหญ่แล้ว จะไปที่ไหนก็ได้

chǎn bpen phûu-yài láaeo jà bpai thîi nǎi gâaw dâi

“I’m an adult now. I can go anywhere.”

5. Thai Relative Pronouns

ประพันธสรรพนาม (phra-phan-tha-sap-pha-naam) is “relative pronoun” in Thai. This type of pronoun is used to do two things in a sentence: 1) Replace the noun in the first sentence, and 2) Link two sentences together. 

In English, relative pronouns are “which,” “where,” “who,” “whom,” and “whose,” depending on the noun.  However, in the Thai language, ที่ (thîi) can be used for all types of nouns. Below are some examples:

Example 1:  

ฉันชอบอาหารที่มีรสหวาน

chǎn châawp aa-hǎan thîi mii rót wǎan

“I like food which is sweet.”

  • ฉันชอบอาหาร (chǎn châawp aa-hǎan) = “I like food.”
  • อาหารมีรสหวาน (aa-hǎan mii rót wǎan) = “Food is sweet.”
I Like Food Which Is Sweet.

Example 2:  

แม่ชอบสถานที่ที่อากาศดี

mâae châawp sà-thǎan-thîi thîi aa-gàat dii

“Mom likes a place where the weather is good.”

  • แม่ชอบสถานที่ (mâae châawp sà-thǎan-thîi) = “Mom likes a place.”
  • สถานที่อากาศดี (sà-thǎan-thîi aa-gàat dii) = “Place has good weather.”

Example 3:  

พ่อชอบลูกน้องที่ขยัน

phâaw châawp lûuk-náawng thîi khà-yǎn

“Dad likes staff (members) who are hardworking.”

  • พ่อชอบลูกน้อง (phâaw châawp lûuk-náawng) = “Dad likes staff (members).”
  • ลูกน้องขยัน (lûuk-náawng khà-yǎn) = “Staff (members) are hardworking.”

Example 4:  

น้องชอบนักร้องที่ฉันชอบเหมือนกัน

náawng châawp nák-ráawng thîi chǎn châawp mǔuean gan

“My sister likes a singer whom I also like.”

  • น้องชอบนักร้อง (náawng châawp nák-ráawng) = “My sister likes a singer.”
  • ฉันชอบนักร้อง (chǎn châawp nák-ráawng) = “I like a singer.”

Example 5:  

เจ้านายเลือกผู้หญิงที่ลายมือสวยมาเป็นเลขา

jâo-naai lûueak phûu-yǐng thîi laai-muue sǔuai maa bpen lee-khǎa

“The boss chose a woman whose handwriting is good to be his secretary.”

  • เจ้านายเลือกผู้หญิงมาเป็นเลขา (jâao-naai lûueak phûu-yǐng maa bpen lee-khǎa) = “The boss chose a woman to be his secretary.”
  • ผู้หญิงลายมือสวย (phûu-yǐng laai-muue sǔuai) = “Woman has good handwriting.”

Actually, there are two other pronouns in this group, which are ซึ่ง (sûeng) and อัน (an). However, Thai people rarely use these words nowadays.

6. วิภาคสรรพนาม 

วิภาคสรรพนาม (ví-phâak-sàp-phá-naam) is the last type of pronoun in Thai, and is actually unique to the Thai language. These pronouns are used to show that the individual components of one noun group do the same (or different) things as each other. This may sound a bit confusing now, but the explanations and examples below should clarify this for you. 

1- ต่าง

Thai pronunciation: dtàang

How to use: This pronoun is used when people in the same group do different things. To use it, put ต่าง (dtàang) after the subject.

Example:  

นักเรียนต่างทำงานในส่วนของตนเองอย่างขยัน

nák-riian dtàang tham ngaan nai sùuan khǎawng dton eeng yàang khà-yǎn

“Each of the students does their part of the work diligently.”

2- บ้าง

Thai pronunciation: bâang

How to use: This pronoun is used when people in the same group do a few different activities. To use it, put บ้าง (bâang) after the subject of the first sentence; for the following sentence, you use บ้าง (bâang) instead of the subject.

Example:  

นักเรียนบ้างก็เล่นกับเพื่อน บ้างก็กินขนมในเวลาพัก

nák-riian bâang gâaw lêen gàp phûuean bâang gâaw gin khà-nǒm nai wee-laa phák

“Some students play with their friends while some students eat snacks during the break.”

  • นักเรียนเล่นกับเพื่อนในเวลาพัก (nák-riian lêen gàp phûuean nai wee-laa phák) = “Students play with their friends during the break.”
  • นักเรียนกินขนมในเวลาพัก (nák-riian gâaw gin khà-nǒm nai wee-laa phák) = “Students eat snacks during the break.”

3- กัน

Thai pronunciation: gan

How to use: This pronoun is used when people in the same group do the same activities together. To use it, put กัน (gan) after the verb.

Example:  

นักเรียนช่วยกันทำความสะอาดห้องเรียน

nák-riian chûuai gan tham khwaam sà-àat hâawng riian

“Students clean the classroom together.”

7. Conclusion

Improve Listening

Congratulations on reaching the conclusion. That means you’ve already learned everything about Thai pronouns. 

Did you find it hard, or are Thai pronouns similar to those in your language? What do you think about this lesson? Please leave a comment below to let us know!

You may find it difficult to remember everything in this Thai pronouns list. Still, since you’ve learned about these pronouns with their Thai pronunciation, you should go back and try to pronounce them throughout the lesson. Saying the words out loud often will help you remember them better. Anyway, we encourage you to keep practicing this lesson. Pronouns are a basic and important part of the Thai language, so you need to know them. Learning Thai pronouns can be hard, but don’t give up.

What should you learn next? Visit ThaiPod101.com to choose your next lesson. There are various lessons on interesting topics you can choose to explore. Since you’ve already learned about pronouns in this lesson, you may want to try 100 Adjectives and 100 Nouns.

Happy Thai learning, and good luck!

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Guide to Thai Time: How to Ask for the Time in Thai & More

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Time is an important part of our life. Thus, it makes sense for Thai learners to learn how to ask for and give the time in Thai. Knowing Thai time phrases enables you to plan your schedule, make appointments, and better understand Thai conversations.

Telling Thai time is pretty different from doing so in English. Most of the words and phrases we’re going to look at aren’t difficult to understand, but you will need some time to get used to using them. For example, you don’t have to worry about remembering a.m. or p.m. in Thai because there is none. And we can also assure you that the way Thai people tell time is pretty straightforward, so it’s not hard to remember.

In this lesson, we’ll teach you basic time-related vocabulary such as the hours, minutes, and seconds in Thai. You’ll also get to learn various ways of telling the time in the Thai language, grouped into formal and informal ways for easier understanding. Of course, you’ll get to see and practice with many examples. Moreover, this lesson also provides you with a list of adverbs of time in Thai for more fluent speech, as well as time-related proverbs.  

So let’s get started!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Time Phrases in Thai Table of Contents
  1. Time-Related Vocabulary in Thailand
  2. Formal Way to Tell Time in Thai
  3. Informal Way to Tell Time in Thai
  4. Time Adverbs in Thai
  5. Time-Related Proverbs and Sayings in Thai
  6. Conclusion

1. Time-Related Vocabulary in Thailand

Time

Before learning how to tell time in Thailand, there’s some vocabulary to get out of the way first. Here’s a list of words you should know.

1- Time 

Thai word: เวลา (wee-laa)  

Example:  

จะเริ่มประชุมเวลากี่โมง

Jà rôoem bprà-chum wee-laa gìi moong

“What time will the meeting start?”

2- Day time 

Thai word: กลางวัน (glaang-wan)

Example:  

ตอนกลางวัน ข้างนอกร้อนมาก

Dtaawn glaang-wan khâang nâawk ráawn mâak

“In the day time, it is very hot outside.”

Additional note

There are three words that are often followed by กลางวัน (glaang-wan), listed below. The meaning of กลางวัน (glaang-wan) and these three words are pretty similar, so they can be used interchangeably.

  • เวลากลางวัน (wee-laa glaang-wan
  • ตอนกลางวัน (dtaawn glaang-wan
  • ช่วงกลางวัน (chûuang glaang-wan)

3- Night time 

Thai word: กลางคืน (glaang-khuuen)

Example:  

อย่าออกไปข้างนอกเวลากลางคืนคนเดียว ไม่ปลอดภัย

Yàa àawk bpai khâang nâawk wee-laa glaang-khuuen khon-diiao mâi bplàawt-phai

“Don’t go out alone at night time, it is not safe.”

Additional note

There are three words that are often followed by กลางคืน (glaang-khuuen), listed below. The meaning of กลางคืน (glaang-khuuen) and these three words are pretty similar, so they can be used interchangeably. 

  • เวลากลางคืน (wee-laa glaang-khuuen
  • ตอนกลางคืน (dtaawn glaang-khuuen
  • ช่วงกลางคืน (chûuang glaang-khuuen)

4- O’clock 

Thai word: นาฬิกา (naa-lí-gaa); โมง (moong)

Example 1:  

เมื่อวานนี้ นายกรัฐมนตรีเดินทางไปประเทศญี่ปุ่นตอนเวลา 10 นาฬิกา

Mûuea-waan-níi naa-yók rát-thà-mon-dtrii dooen-thaang bpai bprà-thêet yîi-bpùn dtaawn wee-laa sìp  naa-lí-gaa

“Yesterday, the prime minister went to Japan at 10 o’clock.”

Example 2:  

เธอจะถึงตอน 4 โมง

Thooe jà thǔeng dtaawn sìi moong

“She will arrive at 4 o’clock.”

Additional note

There are two points you need to know about the words for “o’clock” in Thai. 

One is the difference between นาฬิกา (naa-lí-gaa) and โมง (moong). นาฬิกา (naa-lí-gaa) is used in formal conversations, while โมง (moong) is used in informal conversations.  

Another point you should know is that นาฬิกา (naa-lí-gaa) can also mean “clock” or “watch” in the Thai language.

5- Hour 

Thai word: ชั่วโมง (chûua-moong)

Example:  

1 ชั่วโมงในภาษาไทยคืออะไร

Nùeng chûua-moong nai phaa-sǎa thai khuue à-rai

“What is 1 hour in the Thai language?”

6- Minute 

Thai word: นาที (naa-thii)

Example:  

ขอเวลาอีกไม่กี่นาที

Khǎaw wee-laa ìik mâi gìi naa-thii

“I want a few more minutes.”

7- Second 

Thai word: วินาที (wí-naa-thii)

Example:  

1 นาทีมี 60 วินาที

Nùeng naa-thii mii hòk-sìp wí-naa-thii

“There are 60 seconds in 1 minute.”

Additional note:  

In casual communication, Thai people often shorten the word วินาที (wí-naa-thii) to วิ ().

8. Clock

Thai word: นาฬิกา (naa-lí-gaa)

Example:  

นาฬิกาของเธอสวยจัง

Naa-lí-gaa khǎawng thooe sǔuai jang

“Your clock is so beautiful.”

Additional note:  

As mentioned above, นาฬิกา (naa-lí-gaa) has many meanings in the Thai language. It can mean “o’clock” or “watch.”

9. Watch 

Thai word: นาฬิกาข้อมือ (naa-lí-gaa khâaw muue)

Example:  

นาฬิกาข้อมือของเธอนั้นราคาเท่าไหร่

Naa-lí-gaa khâaw muue khǎawng thooe raa-khaa thâo-rǎi

“How much is your watch?”

Additional note:  

นาฬิกาข้อมือ (naa-lí-gaa khâaw muue) is the combination of two words: นาฬิกา (naa-lí-gaa) which means “clock” and ข้อมือ (khâaw muue) which is “wrist” in Thai. Combined, the word refers to a clock on your wrist, which is a “watch.”

As mentioned above, you can also use the word นาฬิกา (naa-lí-gaa) to refer to a “watch” in the Thai language.  However, comparing the two words, นาฬิกาข้อมือ (naa-lí-gaa khâaw muue) conveys a more specific meaning.

2. Formal Way to Tell Time in Thai 

Improve Listening

In the Thai time system, there are two main ways of telling time: a formal way and an informal way. We’ll start with the formal way first. Thai people rarely use this in daily conversation, and you’re much more likely to hear this in the news or an announcement.

The basic thing you need to know about the Thai clock is that Thai people use the twenty-four-hour clock in formal situations. Fortunately, this part is pretty easy.

1- Formal Way to Tell Time in Thai – Full Version

Below is the pattern you need to remember. You may recognize these words from the vocabulary section above.

….. นาฬิกา   + ….. นาที 

….. naa-lí-gaa   + ….. naa-thii

….. o’clock   + ….. minute

To tell the time, all you need to do is put the number in front of the unit. Just remember that Thai people use the twenty-four-hour format in formal situations. So from 1 p.m. to 12 a.m., don’t forget to change the number of the hour to 13-24 instead. For example:

  • 3 a.m. in Thai is 3 นาฬิกา (sǎam naa-lí-gaa).
  • 4 p.m. in Thai is 16 นาฬิกา (sìp-hòk naa-lí-gaa).
  • 10:26 a.m. in Thai is 10 นาฬิกา 26 นาที (sìp naa-lí-gaa yîi-sìp-hòk naa-thii).
  • 11:58 p.m. in Thai is 23 นาฬิกา 58 นาที (yîi-sìp-sǎam naa-lí-gaa hâa-sìp-bpàaet naa-thii).
4 p.m.

2- Formal Way to Tell Time in Thai – Short Version 

XX:YY น.

Thai people only use this shortened version in writing. You have to remember the pattern above. XX is the hour and YY is the minutes, so just put the numbers for the hour and minute where they belong. For example:

  • 3 a.m. or 3 นาฬิกา (sǎam naa-lí-gaa) is 3:00 น.
  • 4 p.m. or 16 นาฬิกา (sìp-hòk naa-lí-gaa) is 16:00 น.
  • 10:26 a.m. or 10 นาฬิกา 26 นาที (sìp naa-lí-gaa yîi-sìp-hòk naa-thii) is 10:26 น.
  • 11:58 p.m. or 23 นาฬิกา 58 นาที (yîi-sìp-sǎam naa-lí-gaa hâa-sìp-bpàaet naa-thii) is 23:58 น.

3- Common Formal Time-Related Sentences and Phrases

Now, let’s practice some sentences and phrases for telling time in Thai in formal situations.

What time is it?

  • ขณะนี้เวลาเท่าไหร่
  • Khà-nà-níi wee-laa thâo-rài
What Time Is It?

The current time is …..

  • ขณะนี้เวลา ….. นาฬิกา ….. นาที
  • Khà-nà-níi wee-laa ….. naa-lí-ga ….. naa-thii

What time is the …..? 

  • ….. เวลาอะไร
  • ….. wee-laa à-rai

Example:  

ประชุมเวลาอะไร

Bprà-chum wee-laa à-rai

“What time is the meeting?”

The time for XXX is ….. o’clock ….. minute.

  • XXX เวลา ….. นาฬิกา ….. นาที
  • XXX wee-laa ….. naa-lí-gaa ….. naa-thii

Example:  

ประชุมเวลา 10 นาฬิกา

Bprà-chum wee-laa sìp naa-lí-gaa

“The time for the meeting is 10 o’clock.”

3. Informal Way to Tell Time in Thai 

You’ve already learned the formal way to tell the time. Now, let’s learn the informal way. Thai people use this a lot in daily communication, both for speaking and writing.

The first thing you need to know is the main difference between the formal and informal ways to tell time in Thai. For the formal way, Thai people use the twenty-four-hour clock; for the informal way, Thai people use the twelve-hour clock.

When Thai people tell time informally, they either give you the number specifically or tell you the general period of time. We’ll explain both below, respectively. 

1- Informal Way to Say ….. O’clock in Thai

This is more difficult than the formal way of telling the time. Since the way you tell time is different for each period of the day, you have a bit to remember. For easy understanding, we’ve summarized what you need to remember in the table below.

TimeThai wordThai wordExample
1-5 a.m.1-5 a.m.dtii…..ตีสาม (dtii sǎam) is “3 a.m.” in Thai.
6-11 a.m.….. โมงเช้า….. moong cháo7 โมงเช้า (jèt moong cháo) is “7 a.m.” in Thai.
12 p.m.เที่ยงวันthîiang wan
1-5 p.m.บ่าย ….. โมงbàai ….. moongบ่ายสี่โมง (bàai sìi moong) is “4 p.m.” in Thai.
6 p.m.หกโมงเย็นhòk moong yen
 The informal way of telling time from 7-11 p.m. is special. The way to say this is …ทุ่ม (…thûm). However, instead of saying the number on the clock, Thai people start counting 7 as 1, 8 as 2, and so on. 
7 p.m.1 ทุ่มnùeng thûm
8 p.m.2 ทุ่มsǎawng thûm
9 p.m.3 ทุ่มsǎam thûm
10 p.m.4 ทุ่มsìi thûm
11 p.m.5 ทุ่มhâa thûm
12 a.m.6 ทุ่มthîiang-kuuen

2- Informal Way to Give the Minutes in Thai

The informal way of giving someone the hour is quite hard as there’s a lot to remember. However, that’s probably the most difficult part of this lesson and you’ve already passed it. Another bit of good news is that the minute part is pretty easy. There are only three points you have to remember.

0 minute in Thai 

Thai word: ตรง (dtrong)

How to use: In English, if it’s XX:00 a.m. or XX:00 p.m., such as 3 p.m. sharp, you ignore the minute part.  However, Thai people put the word ตรง (dtrong) after the o’clock time.

Example:  

ตอนนี้เวลา 9 โมงตรง

dtaawn-níi wee-laa gâo moong dtrong

“It is 9 a.m. now.”

30 minutes in Thai 

Thai word: ครึ่ง (khrûeng)

How to use

There are two ways to use this word in Thai. 

The first is to just put ครึ่ง (khrûeng) after the o’clock time.  

The second is, if you want to say thirty minutes as a period of time, you use ครึ่งชั่วโมง (khrûeng chûua-moong), which means “half an hour” in Thai.

Example 1:  

เจอกันตอนสองทุ่มครึ่งนะ

Jooe gan dtaawn sǎawng thûm khrûeng ná

“I will meet you at 7:30 p.m.”

Example 2:  

แม่ใช้เวลาทำซุปครึ่งชั่วโมง

Mâae chái wee-laa tham súp khrûeng chûua-moong

“Mom spent thirty minutes cooking soup.”

….. minutes in Thai

Thai word: XX นาที (naa-thii)

How to use: Now that we’ve covered the 0-minute and 30-minute rules, the rest is very easy. It’s the same as the formal way to tell the time. You just put the number followed by นาที (naa-thii).

Example:  

หนังจะเริ่มตอน 10 โมง 15 นาที

Nǎng jà rôoem dtaawn sìp moong sìp-hâa naa-thii

“The movie will start at 10:15 a.m.”

3- Informal Way to Tell the Time Period in Thai

Now that you can tell the time, let’s learn the name of each time period Thai people use in daily life. Thai people use ตอน (dtaawn) followed by the names of each period, except midnight.

Morning (6-9 a.m.) 

Thai word: ตอนเช้า (dtaawn-cháo)

Example:  

ตอนเช้าแถวนี้รถติดมาก

Dtaawn-cháo thǎaeo níi rót thìt mâak

“In the morning, the traffic is very bad around here.”

Nice Weather in the Morning

Morning (9-12 a.m.)  

Thai word: ตอนสาย (dtaawn-sǎai)

Example:  

พ่อออกกำลังกายตอนสาย ๆ ทุกวัน

Phâaw àawk-gam-lang-gaai dtaawn-sǎai-sǎai thúk wan

“Dad exercises every day in the morning.”

Noon (12 p.m.) 

Thai word: ตอนเที่ยง (dtaawn-thîiang)

Example:  

ตอนเที่ยงอากาศข้างนอกร้อนมาก

Dtaawn-thîiang aa-gàat khâang nâawk ráawn mâak

“The weather outside is very hot at noon.”

Afternoon (1-3 p.m.) 

Thai word: ตอนบ่าย (dtaawn-bàai)

Example:  

ตอนบ่ายวันพรุ่งนี้ ฉันมีประชุม

Dtaawn-bàai wan phrûng-níi chǎn mii bprà-chum

“I have a meeting tomorrow afternoon.”

Afternoon (3-6 p.m.) 

Thai word: ตอนเย็น (dtaawn-yen)

Example:  

ร้านอาหารแถวบ้านคิวยาวมากตอนเย็น

ráan aa-hǎan thǎaeo bâan khiu yaao mâak dtaawn-yen

“The queue of restaurants near my home is very long in the evening.”

Evening (6-9 p.m.) 

Thai word: ตอนค่ำ (dtaawn-khâm)

Example:  

น้องกลับถึงบ้านตอนค่ำเพราะรถติด

Náawng glàp thǔng bâan dtaawn-khâm phráw rót dtìt

“My sister came back home in the evening because of a traffic jam.”

Night (9-12 p.m.) 

Thai word: ตอนดึก (dtaawn-dùek)

Example:  

เธอตื่นสายเพราะมัวแต่เล่นเกมส์ตอนดึกเมื่อคืน

thooe dtùuen sǎai phráw muua dtàae lèn geem dtaawn-dùek mûuea-khuuen

“She woke up late because she played a game last night.”

Midnight (12 a.m.) 

Thai word: เที่ยงคืน (thîiang-khuuen)

Example:  

เที่ยงคืนแล้ว ยังนอนไม่หลับเลย

Thîiang-khuuen láaeo yang naawn mâi làp looei

“I still can’t sleep despite it being midnight.”

It’s Already Midnight

4- Common Informal Time-Related Sentences and Phrases

Now that you know how to informally tell the time in Thai, you should practice some time-related sentences and phrases to use in real life! 

What time is it?

  • ตอนนี่กี่โมงแล้ว
  • Dtaawn-níi gìi moong láaeo

The current time is ….. 

  • ตอนนี้เวลา …..
  • Dtaawn-níi wee-laa …..

What time is the …..? 

  • ….. ตอนกี่โมง
  • ….. dtaawn gìi moong

Example:  

กินข้าวเย็นตอนกี่โมง

gin kâao yen dtaawn gìi moong

“What time is dinner?”

The time for XXX is YYY.

  • XXX ตอน YYY
  • XXX dtawwn YYY

Example:  

กินข้าวเย็นตอน 6 โมงครึ่ง

Gin khâao yen dtaawn hòk moong khrûeng

“The time for dinner is at 6:30 p.m.”

4. Time Adverbs in Thai 

Now that you know how to tell time in Thai, it’s useful to know some time adverbs as well. They will enable you to include more detail and speak more like a native when telling the time in Thai. Here’s a list of time adverbs you should know:

1- Right now 

Thai word: ตอนนี้ (thaawn-níi); เดี๋ยวนี้ (dǐiao-níi)

Example 1:  

เธอต้องทำตอนนี้เลย

Thooe dtâawng tham dtaawn-níi looei

“You have to do it right now.”

Example 2:  

ออกไปเดี๋ยวนี้เลย!!

Àawk bpai dǐiao-níi loei

“Get out right now!!”

Additional note:  

ตอนนี้ (thaawn-níi) and เดี๋ยวนี้ (dǐiao-níi) are pretty much the same and can be used interchangeably. However, เดี๋ยวนี้ (dǐiao-níi) conveys a more immediate and urgent feeling.

2- Currently

Thai word: ปัจจุบันนี้ (bpàt-jù-baan níi)

Example:  

ปัจจุบันนี้ โรงเรียนของเรามีนักเรียน 500 คน

Bpàt-jù-baan níi roong-riian khǎawng rao mii nák riian hâa-ráauy khon

“Currently, our school has 500 students.”

3- Before 

Thai word: ก่อน (gàawn)

Example:  

อย่าลืมล้างมือก่อนกินข้าว

Yàa luuem láang muue gàawn gin khâao

“Don’t forget to wash your hands before the meal.”

Additional note:  

When using ก่อน (gàawn), the event that happens first is always in front of ก่อน (gàawn), while the event that happens later is put behind it.

4- After

Thai word: หลัง (lǎang)

Example:  

หลังกินอาหาร ต้องทานยาทันที

Lǎang gin aa-hǎan dtâawng thaan yaa than-thii

“Take medicine immediately after meals.”

Additional note:  

When using หลัง (lǎang), the event that happens later always follows หลัง (lǎang). But the event that happens first can be both in front of and after หลัง (lǎang).

5- Soon 

Thai word: เร็ว ๆ นี้ (reo-reo-níi)

Example:  

เจอกันเร็ว ๆ นี้

Jooe gan reo-reo-níi

“See you soon.”

6- Almost 

Thai word: เกือบ (gùueap)

Example:  

อาหารเกือบจะเสร็จแล้ว

Aa-hǎan gùueap jà sèt láaeo

“The food is almost done.”

7- In a while

Thai word: อีกสักครู่ (ìik sàk-khrûu)

Example:  

งานจะจบในอีกสักครู่

Ngaan jà jòp nai ìik sàk-khrûu

“The event will end in a while.”

8- For a long time

Thai word: เป็นเวลานาน (bpen wee-laa naan)

Example:  

เขาอาศัยอยู่ที่บ้านหลังนี้เป็นเวลานานแล้ว

Khǎo aa-sǎi yùu thîi bâan lǎang níi bpen wee-laa naan láaeo

“He has lived in his house for a long time.”

9- Anytime

Thai word: เมื่อไหร่ก็ได้ (mûuea-rài gâaw dâi); ตอนไหนก็ได้ (dtaawn-nǎi gâaw dâi)

Example 1:  

เธอจะมาที่นี่เมื่อไหร่ก็ได้

Thooe jà ma thîi nîi mûuea-rài gâaw dâi

“You can come here anytime.”

Example 2:  

พรุ่งนี้วันอาทิตย์ ฉันจะตื่นนอนตอนไหนก็ได้

Phrûng-níi wan-aa-thít chǎn jà dtùuen naawn dtaawn nǎi gâaw dâi

“Tomorrow is Sunday. I can wake up anytime.”

Additional note:  

เมื่อไหร่ก็ได้ (mûuea-rài gâaw dâi) and ตอนไหนก็ได้ (dtaawn-nǎi gâaw dâi) are exactly the same and can substitute one another.

10- As soon as possible

Thai word: โดยเร็วที่สุด (dooi reo thîi sùt)

Example:  

ฉันจะทำให้เสร็จโดยเร็วที่สุด

Chǎn jà tham hâi sèt dooi reo thîi sùt

“I will finish it as soon as possible.”

5. Time-Related Proverbs and Sayings in Thai

As you learn about Thai time, it’s a great idea to learn some proverbs and sayings about time in Thai. Below are five proverbs and sayings you should know! 

1- ผัดวันประกันพรุ่ง

Thai pronunciation: phàt-wan-bprà-gan-prûng

Literal meaning:  –

English meaning: Keep postponing the time

Explanation: This proverb is used to explain a situation in which something is being postponed many times over. For example, A promises to finish his homework on Saturday at first, but then he tells his mom that he’ll finish it on Sunday instead. When Sunday comes, he tells her that he’ll  finish on Monday. ผัดวันประกันพรุ่ง (phàt-wan-bprà-gan-prûng) can explain A’s behavior well.

Example:  

ทำให้เสร็จเลย อย่าผัดวันประกันพรุ่ง

Tham hâi sèt looei  yàa phàt-wan-bprà-gan-phrûng

“Finish it now, don’t keep postponing the deadline.”

2- ไก่โห่

Thai pronunciation: gài-hòo

Literal meaning: Cock yells.

English meaning: Very early morning

Explanation: Since the cock often crows in the early morning, Thai people call the early morning time ไก่โห่ (gài-hòo).

Example:  

วันนี้แม่ปลุกฉันตั้งแต่ไก่โห่

Wan-níi mâae bplùk chǎn dtâng dtàae gài-hòo

“Today, mom woke me up in the early morning.”

Rooster Crows Loudly

3- คาบเส้นยาแดง

Thai pronunciation: khâap sên yaa daaeng

Literal meaning:  –

English meaning: Almost not finishing the task in time

Explanation: The Thai proverb คาบเส้นยาแดง (khâap sên yaa daaeng) is used to explain when someone nearly misses their deadline to do something.  

Example:  

เธอทำรายงานเสร็จแบบคาบเส้นยาแดงพอดีเลย

Thooe tham raai-ngaan sèt bàaep khâap sên yaa daaeng phaaw dii loeei

“She almost didn’t finish the report in time.”

4- เวลาเป็นเงินเป็นทอง

Thai pronunciation: wee-laa bpen ngen bpen thaawng

Literal meaning: Time is silver and gold.

English meaning: Time is valuable.

Explanation: This Thai saying is used to say that time is valuable. It’s often used in situations when you’re made to wait for no good reason or your time is being wasted.

Example:  

ทำเร็ว ๆ หน่อย อย่าให้ต้องรอนาน เวลาเป็นเงินเป็นทอง

Tham reo-reo nàauy yàa hâi dtâawng raaw naan wee-laa bpen ngen bpen thaawng

“Quickly, don’t make me wait. My time is valuable.”

5- เวลาผ่านไปไวเหมือนโกหก

Thai pronunciation: wee-la phàan bpai wai mǔuean goo-hok

Literal meaning: Time passed quickly as if flying.

English meaning: Time flies.

Explanation: This Thai phrase is used to explain that time passes very quickly. Its meaning is exactly the same as “time flies” in English.

Example:  

อีกไม่กี่วันลูกชายก็จะอายุ 20 ปีแล้ว เวลาผ่านไปไวเหมือนโกหก

Ìik mâi gìi wan lûuk chaai gâaw jà aa-yú yîi-sìp bpii láaeo wee-la phàan bpai wai mǔuean goo-hòk

“My son will be twenty years old in a few days. Time flies.”

6. Conclusion

Basic Questions

What do you think about our Thai time lesson? Did you find it easy or difficult? How does time-telling in Thai compare to telling time in your own language? Please comment below to let us know.

In our opinion, some parts of this lesson are easy while others are a bit more complicated. However, with some practice, you can master it in no time. Try practicing this a lot with your peers or other Thai people you know. If you practice a lot, you’ll find everything you learned here a lot easier to remember. 

And once you’re good with this lesson, don’t forget to check out other interesting and fun lessons at ThaiPod101.com, such as Songkran Festival, Noodle in the Boat, or Wat Phra Kaew. In addition to learning more about the Thai language, you’ll also get to learn about Thai culture and traditions!

Until next time, happy Thai learning!

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Learn the Top 100 Thai Nouns



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The noun is a basic component of sentences in any language, including Thai. In order to communicate in Thai, you need to know enough vocabulary to form the sentence, and this includes nouns. Thus, as a Thai learner, it’s important for you to learn Thai nouns for better communication.

While learning about nouns in Thai is essential in mastering the language itself, it can also introduce you to certain cultural aspects and traditions. For example, in learning the basic Thai nouns related to food and utensils, you can guess how people eat.

Further, in our guide about Thai language nouns, you’ll also get to learn about คำทับศัพท์ (kham-tháp-sàp), or English words that are used in the Thai language.

In this lesson, ThaiPod101.com provides you with a basic Thai noun list for words that are often used in daily life, categorized into groups for easy memorization. You’ll get to learn about nouns in Thai vocabulary, learn nouns in Thai grammar, see examples of nouns in Thai sentences, and more. Still, this lesson won’t cover the topic of noun classifiers yet, as this will be too complicated to explain here.

But before we get to all of that, let’s learn basic Thai nouns first. คำนาม (kham-naam) is “noun” in Thai. Below is the beginning of our list of the most common Thai nouns.

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Table of Contents
  1. Thai Nouns about Family Members
  2. Thai Nouns about Body Parts
  3. Thai Nouns about Occupations
  4. Thai Nouns about School Essentials
  5. Thai Nouns about Appliances
  6. Thai Nouns about Technology
  7. Thai Nouns about Transportation
  8. Thai Nouns about Restaurants
  9. Thai Nouns about Time
  10. Conclusion


1. Thai Nouns about Family Members


The first group of basic Thai nouns you should learn are those about family members.

Lovely Family

1- Father

Thai noun: พ่อ (phâaw)

Example:
พ่อชอบกินไข่
Phâaw châawp gin khài
My father likes eggs.

2- Mother

Thai noun: แม่ (mâae)

Example:
แม่ทำอาหารอร่อยมาก
Mâae tham aa-hǎan à-ràauy mâak
My mother is very good at cooking.

3- Older sibling

Thai noun: พี่ (phîi)

Example:
ฉันมีพี่ 2 คน
Chǎn mii phîi sǎawng khon
I have two older siblings.

Additional note: พี่ (phîi) can be used for both male and female siblings.

4- Younger sibling

Thai noun: น้อง (náawng)

Example:
ฉันมีน้อง 1 คน
Chǎn mii náawng nùeng khon
I have one younger sibling.

Additional note: Like พี่ (phîi), น้อง (náawng) can be used for both male and female siblings.

5- Family

Thai noun: ครอบครัว (khrâawp-khruua)

Example:
ครอบครัวของเรามี 6 คน
Khrâawp-khruua khǎawng rao mii hòk khon
There are six members in our family.

**For those who want to learn even more Thai nouns for family, please check out our article about family members!

2. Thai Nouns about Body Parts


Nouns 1

The second group of basic Thai nouns you should learn are those related to body parts.

1- Head

Thai noun: หัว (hǔua); ศีรษะ (sǐi-sà)

Example 1:
เมื่อวานฉันปวดหัว
Mûuea-waan chǎn bpùuat hǔua
I had a headache yesterday.

Example 2:
เพดานเตี้ย โปรดระวังศีรษะ
Phee-daan-dtîia Bpròot rá-wang sǐi-sà
The ceiling is low; mind your head.

Additional note: In the Thai language, the meanings of หัว (hǔua) and ศีรษะ (sǐi-sà) are exactly the same. However, ศีรษะ (sǐi-sà) is more formal than หัว (hǔua).

2- Face

Thai noun: หน้า (nâa)

Example:
พ่อทำหน้าตลก ๆ เก่งมาก
Phâaw tham nâa dtà-lòk-dtà-lòk gèng mâak
My father is good at making funny faces.

3- Eye

Thai noun: ตา (dtaa)

Example:
ตาของเธอสวยมาก
Dtaa khǎawng thooe sǔuai mâak
Her eyes are very beautiful.

Additional note: ตา (dtaa) can also refer to the father of one’s mother, or “grandfather.”

4- Ear

Thai noun: หู (hǔu)

Example:
มีอะไรเลอะหูเธออยู่นะ
Mii à-rai lóe hǔu thooe yùu ná
There is something dirty near your ear.

5- Nose

Thai noun: จมูก (jà-mùuk)

Example:
จมูกของฉันกับแม่เหมือนกันมาก
Jà-mùuk khǎawng chǎn gàp mâae mǔuean gan mâak
My nose looks exactly like my mother’s.

6- Mouth

Thai noun: ปาก (bpàak)

Example:
ฉันเผลอกัดปากตัวเองตอนเคี้ยวขนม เจ็บมาก
Chǎn phlǒoe gàt bpàak dtuua-eeng dtaawn khíiao khà-nǒm jèp mâak
I accidentally bit my mouth while chewing a snack. It hurts a lot.

7- Tongue

Thai noun: ลิ้น (lín)

Example:
กินของร้อนมาก ระวังลิ้นพอง
Gin khǎawng ráawn mâak rá-wang lín phaawng
Be careful when eating hot food; it can burn your tongue.

8- Arm

Thai noun: แขน (khǎaen)

Example:
เธอออกกำลังกายทุกวัน ทำให้แขนสวยมาก
Thooe àawk-gam-lang-gaai thúk wan tham hâi khǎaen sǔuai mâak
She exercises everyday, making her arm’s shape very beautiful.

9- Leg

Thai noun: ขา (khǎa)

Example:
เมื่อวานไปซื้อของกับเพื่อนมา เมื่อยขามาก
Mûuea waan bpai súue khǎawng gàp phûuean maa mûueai khǎa mâak
I went shopping with friends yesterday, making my legs ache.

10- Hand

Thai noun: มือ (muue)

Example:
ระวังมีดบาดมือ
Rá-wang mîit bàat muue
Be careful not to cut your hand with the knife.

12- Shoulder

Thai noun: หัวไหล่ (hǔua-lài); ไหล่ (lài)

Example 1:
ถ้าสะพายกระเป๋าหนักมาก ๆ อาจทำให้หัวไหล่เจ็บได้
Thâa sà-phaai grà-bpǎo nàk mâak-mâak àat tham hâi hǔua-lài jèp dâi
If you carry a bag that’s too heavy, it may make your shoulder hurt.

Example 2:
ทำไมคนแก่มักปวดไหล่
Tham-mai khon-gàae mák bpùuat lài
Why do elders often have shoulder aches?

Additional note: ไหล่ (lài) is shortened word of หัวไหล่ (hǔua-lài). Thai people often use ไหล่ (lài) more in oral conversation.

3. Thai Nouns about Occupations


The third group of basic Thai nouns you should learn are those you can use to talk about your occupation or job.

What Is Your Occupation?

1- Government officer

Thai noun: ข้าราชการ (khâa-râat-chá-gaan)

Example:
ลุงของฉันเป็นข้าราชการ
Lung khǎawng chǎn bpen khâa-râat-chá-gaan
My uncle is a government officer.

2- Businessman / Businesswoman

Thai noun: นักธุรกิจ (nák-thú-rá-gìt)

Example:
พ่อเป็นนักธุรกิจที่เก่ง
Phâaw bpen nák-thú-rá-gìt thîi gèng
My father is a smart businessman.

Additional note: In Thai, นักธุรกิจ (nák-thú-rá-gìt) can be used when referring to both males and females.

3- Doctor

Thai noun: หมอ (mǎaw)

Example:
ถ้าอยากเป็นหมอต้องตั้งใจเรียนนะ
Thâa yàak bpen mǎaw dtâawng dtâng-jai riian ná
If you want to be a doctor, you have to pay attention in class.

4- Nurse

hai noun: พยาบาล (phá-yaa-baan)

Example:
พยาบาลคนนั้นเจาะเลือดเก่ง
Phá-yaa-baan khon nán jàw lûueat gèng
That nurse is good at drawing blood.

5- Lawyer

Thai noun: ทนาย (thá-naai)

Example:
ทนายคนนั้นตัวสูงมาก
Thá-naai khon nán dtuua sǔung mâak
That lawyer is so tall.

6- Engineer

Thai noun: วิศวกร (wít-sà-wá-gaawn)

Example:
น้องชายฉันอยากเป็นวิศวกร
Náawng-chai chǎn yàak bpen wít-sà-wá-gaawn
My younger brother wants to be an engineer.

7- Accountant

Thai noun: นักบัญชี (nák-ban-chii)

Example:
แม่เป็นนักบัญชี
Mâae bpen nák-ban-chii
My mother is an accountant.

8- Hairdresser

Thai noun: ช่างตัดผม (châang-dtàt-phǒm)

Example:
ช่างตัดผมของฉันชื่อจอย
Châang-dtàt-phǒm khǎawng chǎn chûue jaauy
My hairdresser’s name is Joy.

9- Makeup artist

Thai noun: ช่างแต่งหน้า (châang-dtàaeng-nâa)

Example:
กระเป๋าของช่างแต่งหน้าใบใหญ่มาก
Grà-bpǎo khǎawng châang-dtàaeng-nâa bai yài mâak
A makeup artist’s bag is very big.

10- Actor / Actress

Thai noun: นักแสดง (nák-sà-daaeng)

Example:
นักแสดงคนโปรดของฉันคืออนันดา
Nák-sà-daaeng khon-bpròot khǎawng chǎn khuue à-nan-daa
My favorite artist is Ananda.

Additional note: In Thai, นักแสดง (nák-sà-daaeng) can be used when referring to both males and females.

11- Driver

Thai noun: คนขับรถ (khon-khàp-rót)

Example:
คนรวยมักจ้างคนขับรถ
Khon ruuai mák jâang khon-khàp-rót
Rich people often hire a driver.

12- Policeman / Policewoman

Thai noun: ตำรวจ (dtam-rùuat)

Example:
เครื่องแบบของตำรวจสีน้ำตาล
Khrûueang-bàap khǎawng dtam-rùuat sǐi nám-dtaan
Police uniforms are brown.

Additional note: In Thai, ตำรวจ (dtam-rùuat) can be used when referring to both males and females.

4. Thai Nouns about School Essentials


Nouns 2

The fourth group of the most common Thai nouns you should learn are the ones about school.

1- School

Thai noun: โรงเรียน (roong-riian)

Example:
โรงเรียนของฉันใหญ่มาก
Roong-riian khǎawng chǎn yài mâak
My school is very big.

2- University

Thai noun: มหาวิทยาลัย (má-hǎa-wít-thá-yaa-lai)

Example:
มหาวิทยาลัยของฉันอยู่ที่ท่าพระจันทร์
Má-hǎa-wít-thá-yaa-lai khǎawng chǎn yùu thîi thâa-phrá-jan
My university is at ท่าพระจันทร์ (thâa-prá-jan).

3- Teacher

Thai noun: ครู (khruu)

Example:
ครูส้มใจดีมาก
Khruu sôm jai-dii mâak
The Teacher Som is very kind.

4- Student

Thai noun: นักเรียน (nák-riian)

Example:
นักเรียนห้ามเข้าห้องเรียนสาย
Nák-riian hâam khâo hâawng-riian sǎai
Students mustn’t be late to class.

5- Classroom

Thai noun: ห้องเรียน (hâawng-riian)

Example:
ห้องเรียนฉันมีนักเรียน 30 คน
Hâawng-riian chǎn mii nák-riian sǎam-sìp khon
There are thirty students in my classroom.

6- Report

Thai noun: รายงาน (raai-ngaan)

Example:
รายงานวิชานี้ยากที่สุด
Raai-ngaan wí-chaa níi yâak thîi sùt
The report for this subject is the most difficult one.

7- Homework

Thai noun: การบ้าน (gaan-bâan)

Example:
ไม่มีนักเรียนคนไหนชอบการบ้าน
Mâi mii nák-riian khon nǎi châawp gaan-bâan
No student likes homework.

8- Group work

Thai noun: งานกลุ่ม (ngaan-glùm)

Example:
งานกลุ่มวิชาภาษาอังกฤษยากมั๊ย
Ngaan-glùm wí-chaa phaa-sǎa ang-grìt yâak mái
Is English’s group work difficult?

9- Individual work

Thai noun: งานเดี่ยว (ngan dìiao)

Example:
ฉันทำงานเดี่ยววิชาภาษาไทยเสร็จแล้ว
Chǎn tham ngaan dìiao wí-chaa phaa-saa thai sèt láaeo
I already finished my individual work for the Thai subject.

10- Test

Thai noun: สอบ (sàawp)

Example:
พรุ่งนี้มีสอบภาษาญี่ปุ่น
Phrûng-níi mii sàawp phaa-sǎa yîi-bpùn
There is a Japanese test tomorrow.

11- Bachelor’s degree

Thai noun: ปริญญาตรี (bpà-rin-yaa dtrii)

Example:
แม่ดีใจมากตอนฉันได้ปริญญาตรี
Mâae dii-jai mâak dtaawn chǎn dâi bpà-rin-yaa dtrii
My mother was very happy when I got my bachelor’s degree.

12- Master’s degree

Thai noun: ปริญญาโท (bpà-rin-yaa thoo)

Example:
ฉันอยากได้ปริญญาโท
Chǎn yàak dâi bpà-rin-yaa thoo
I want to get a master’s degree.

13- PhD

Thai noun: ปริญญาเอก (bpà-rin-yaa èek)

Example:
คนที่เรียนจบปริญญาเอกต้องฉลาดมากแน่ ๆ
Khon thîi riian jòp brà-rin-yaa èek dtâawng chà-làat mâak nâae-nâae
People who have a PhD must be very smart.

5. Thai Nouns about Appliances


The fifth group of common Thai nouns are those about appliances that Thai people often use.

1- Television

Thai noun: โทรทัศน์ (thoo-rá-thát); ทีวี (thii-wii)

Example 1:
โทรทัศน์เดี๋ยวนี้ราคาไม่แพงมากเหมือนเมื่อก่อน
Thoo-rá-thát dǐiao-níi raa-khaa mâi phaaeng mâak mǔuean mûuea gàawn
Televisions nowadays aren’t as expensive as they were in the past.

Example 2:
น้องชอบดูทีวีมาก
Náawng châawp duu thii-wii mâak
My younger sibling loves watching TV.

Additional note: ทีวี (thii-wii) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language. โทรทัศน์ (thoo-rá-thát) is more formal than ทีวี (thii-wii). However, Thai people normally use ทีวี (thii-wii) when speaking.

Watching TV together

2- Radio

Thai noun: ทยุ (wít-thá-yú)

Example:
เดี๋ยวนี้คนไม่ค่อยฟังวิทยุกันแล้ว
Dǐiao-níi khon mâi khâauy fang wít-thá-yú gan láaeo
Nowadays, people rarely listen to the radio.

3- Speaker

Thai noun: ลำโพง (lam-phoong)

Example:
ฉันได้ลำโพงเป็นของขวัญวันเกิด
Chǎn dâi lam-phoong bpen khǎawng-khwǎn wan-gòoet
I got a speaker as a birthday gift.

4- Air conditioner

Thai noun: เครื่องปรับอากาศ (khrûueang bpràp aa-gàat); แอร์ (aae)

Example 1:
ถ้าเปิดเครื่องปรับอากาศทุกวัน ค่าไฟจะแพงมาก
Thâa bpòoet khrûueang bpràp aa-gàat thúk-wan khâa fai jà phaaeng mâak
If you turn on the air conditioner every day, the electricity bill will be very expensive.

Example 2:
ถ้าอากาศร้อนก็เปิดแอร์ได้
Thâa aa-gàat ráawn gâaw bpòoet aae dai
You can turn on the air conditioner if it’s very hot.

Additional note:แอร์ (aae) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language. However, for this word, Thai people shorten it. เครื่องปรับอากาศ (khrûueang bpràp aa-gàat) is more formal than แอร์ (aae). Still, Thai people normally use แอร์ (aae) when speaking.

5- Fan

Thai noun: พัดลม (phát-lom)

Example:
เปิดพัดลมให้หน่อย
Bpòoet phát-lom hâi nàauy
Turn on the fan, please.

6- Fridge

Thai noun: ตู้เย็น (dtûu-yen)

Example:
ตู้เย็นที่บ้านเสีย
Dtûu-yen thîi bâan sǐia
The fridge at home is broken.

7- Toaster

Thai noun: เครื่องปิ้งขนมปัง (khrûueang bpîng khà-nǒm-bpang)

Example:
ฉันอยากได้เครื่องปิ้งขนมปัง
Chǎn yàak dâi khrûueang bpîng khà-nǒm-bpang
I want a toaster.

8- Microwave

Thai noun: ไมโครเวฟ (mai-khroo-wéep)

Example:
ไมโครเวฟราคาแพงมั๊ย
Mai-khroo-wéep raa-khaa phaaeng mái
Is a microwave expensive?

9- Water heater

Thai noun: เครื่องทำน้ำอุ่น (khrûueng tham nám ùn)

Example:
พ่อเพิ่งซื้อเครื่องทำน้ำอุ่นมา
Phâaw phôoeng súue khrûueng tham nám ùn maa
My father just bought a water heater.

10- Hair dryer

Thai noun: ไดร์เป่าผม (dai bpào phǒm)

Example:
ไดร์เป่าผมอันนั้นสีสวยจัง
Dai bpào phǒm an nán sǐi sǔuai jang
That hair dryer has a nice color.

6. Thai Nouns about Technology


Nouns 3

The sixth group of common Thai nouns are those related to technology.

1- Computer

Thai noun: คอมพิวเตอร์ (khaawm-phiu-dtôoe)

Example:
คอมพิวเตอร์เครื่องใหม่อยู่ข้างบน
Khaawm-phiu-dtôoe khrûueang mài yùu khâang bon
The new computer is upstairs.

Additional note: คอมพิวเตอร์ (khaawm-phiu-dtôoe) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language.

2- Laptop

Thai noun: โน๊ตบุ๊ค (nóot-búk)

Example:
โน๊ตบุุ๊คของเธอหนักมาก
Nóot-búk khǎawng thooe nàk mâak
Her laptop is so heavy.

3- Cell phone

Thai noun: โทรศัพท์มือถือ (thoo-rá-sàp muue-thǔue); มือถือ (muue-thǔue)

Example 1:
โทรศัพท์มือถือรุ่นใหม่เบามาก
Thoo-rá-sàp muue-thǔue rûn mǎi bao mâak
The new version of the mobile phone is so light.

Example 2:
พ่อทำมือถือหายอีกแล้ว
Phâaw tham muue-thǔue hǎai ìik láaeo
Dad lost his mobile phone again.

Additional note: มือถือ (muue-thǔue) is a shortened word of โทรศัพท์มือถือ (thoo-rá-sàp muue-thǔue). Thus, people often use มือถือ (muue-thǔue) when speaking. โทรศัพท์มือถือ (thoo-rá-sàp muue-thǔue) is more formal.

4- Headphone

Thai noun: หูฟัง (hǔu-fang)

Example:
หูฟังอยู่ตรงไหน
Hǔu-fang yùu dtrong nǎi
Where is the headphone?

5- Tablet

Thai noun: แท็บเล็ต (tháep-lèt)

Example:
แม่ชอบดูยูทูปผ่านแท็บเล็ต
Mâae châawp duu yuu-thúup phàan tháep-lèt
Mom likes to watch YouTube via tablet.

Additional note: แท็บเล็ต (tháep-lèt) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language.

6- Charger

Thai noun: สายชาร์ต (sǎai-cháat)

Example:
แม่วางสายชาร์ตไว้ข้างทีวี
Mâae wang sǎai-cháat wái khâang thii-wii
Mom put the charger near the TV.

7- Internet

Thai noun: อินเตอร์เน็ต (in-dtooe-nèt)

Example:
การหาข้อมูลผ่านอินเตอร์เน็ตทำให้ชีวิตง่ายขึ้น
Gaan hǎa khâaw-muun phàan in-dtooe-nèt tham hâi chii-wít ngâai khûen
Finding information using the internet makes life easier.

Additional note: อินเตอร์เน็ต (in-dtooe-nèt) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language.

8- Wifi

Thai noun: ไวไฟ (wai-fai)

Example:
ที่โรงแรมมีไวไฟให้ด้วย
Thîi roong-raaem mii wai-fai hâi dûuai
There is wifi available at the hotel.

Additional note: ไวไฟ (wai-fai) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language.

9- Signal

Thai noun: สัญญาณ (sǎn-yaan)

Example:
บนภูเขาบางทีก็ไม่มีสัญญาณโทรศัพท์
Bon phuu-khǎo baang-thii gâaw mâi mii sǎn-yaan thoo-rá-sàp
Sometimes, there is no phone signal at the mountain.

10- Application

Thai noun: แอพพลิเคชั่น (aáep-phlì-khee-chân); แอพ (áaep)

Example 1:
โปรดอัพเดทแอพพลิเคชั่นให้เป็นเวอร์ชั่นล่าสุด
Bplòot áp-dèet áaep-phlì-khee-chân hâi bpen wooe-chân lâa-sùt
Please update the application to the latest version.

Example 2:
เธอโหลดแอพใหม่ยัง
Thooe lòot áaep mài yang
Have you downloaded the application yet?

Additional note: แอพ (áaep) is a shortened word of แอพพลิเคชั่น (áaep-phlì-khee-chân). Thus, people often use แอพ (áaep) when speaking. แอพพลิเคชั่น (áaep-phlì-khee-chân) is more formal.

11- Website

Thai noun: เว็บไซต์ (wép-sái)

Example:
เธอชอบเข้าเว็บไซต์อะไร
Thooe châawp khâo wép-sái à-rai
Which website do you like to visit?

Additional note: เว็บไซต์ (wép-sái) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language.

12- Picture

Thai noun: รูปภาพ (rûup-phâap)

Example:
มือถือฉันมีรูปภาพแมวเยอะมาก
Muue-thǔue chǎn mii rûup-phâap maaew yóe mâak
There are a lot of cat pictures on my mobile phone.

13- File

Thai noun: ไฟล์ (fai)

Example:
ส่งไฟล์มาให้หน่อย
Sòng fai maa hâi nhàauy
Send the file to me.

Additional note: ไฟล์ (fai) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham-tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language.

14- Email

Thai noun: อีเมล (ii-meeo). Despite ending with ล, this word sounds like ว more than ล, so I use meeo instead of meen.

Example:
อีเมลของเธอคืออะไร
Ii-meeo khǎawng thooe khuue à-rai
What is your email?

Additional note: อีเมล (ii-meeo) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham-tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language.

My Email

15- Password

Thai noun: พาสเวิร์ด (pháat-wòoet)

Example:
อย่าบอกพาสเวิร์ดให้คนอื่นรู้
Yàa bàawk pháat-wòoet hâi khon ùuen rúu
Don’t tell your password to others.

Additional note: พาสเวิร์ด (pháat-wòoet) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham-tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language.

7. Thai Nouns about Transportation


Next up on our Thai nouns list are the essential words you need to know regarding transportation.

1- Plane

Thai noun: เครื่องบิน (khrûueang-bin)

Example:
แม่จะไปเชียงใหม่โดยเครื่องบิน
Mâae jà bpai chiiang-mài dooi khrûueang-bin
Mom will go to Chiiangmai by plane.

2- Helicopter

Thai noun: เฮลิคอปเตอร์ (hee-lí-kháwp-dtôoe)

Example:
เฮลิคอปเตอร์เสียงดังมาก
Hee-lí-kháwp-dtôoe sǐiang dang mâak
Helicopters have a loud noise.

Additional note: เฮลิคอปเตอร์ (hee-lí-kháwp-dtôoe) is คำทับศัพท์ (kham-tháp-sàp), which is an English word used in the Thai language.

3- Car

Thai noun: รถยนต์ (rót-yon)

Example:
รถยนต์คันนั้นสกปรกมาก
Rót-yon khan nán sòk-gà-bpròk mâak
That car is very dirty.

4- Train

Thai noun: รถไฟ (rót-fai)

Example:
ถ้านั่งรถไฟจะใช้เวลานาน
Thâa nâng rót-fai jà chái wee-laa naan
It takes a long time if you go by train.

5- Bus

Thai noun: รถเมล์ (rót-mee)

Example:
วันศุกร์รถเมล์คนแน่นมาก
Wan-sùk rót-mee khon nâaen mâak
It is very crowded on the bus on Friday.

6- Truck

Thai noun: รถบรรทุก (rót-ban-thúk)

Example:
อย่าขับรถใกล้รถบรรทุก
Yàa khàp rót glâi rót-ban-thúk
Don’t drive near the truck.

7- Sky train

Thai noun: รถไฟฟ้า (rót-fai-fáa)

Example:
ค่ารถไฟฟ้าไปคอนโดเธอกี่บาท
Khâa rót-fai-fáa bpai khaawn-doo thooe gìi bàat
How much is the sky train fare to your condo?

Additional note: Apart from รถไฟฟ้า (rót-fai-fáa), Thai people often call the sky train บีทีเอส (BTS), which is the name of the company that runs the sky train in Thailand.

8- Subway

Thai noun: รถไฟฟ้าใต้ดิน (rót-fai-fáa dtâi din)

Example:
ฉันชอบนั่งรถไฟฟ้าใต้ดิน เร็วดี
Chǎn châawp nâng rót-fai-fáa dtâi din reo dii
I like to travel via subway; it is fast.

Additional note: Similar to รถไฟฟ้า (rót-fai-fáa), Thai people often call the subway เอ็มอาร์ที (MRT), which is the name of the company that runs the subway in Thailand.

9- Motorbike

Thai noun: มอเตอร์ไซต์ (maaw-dtooe-sai)

Example:
ถ้าจะนั่งมอเตอร์ไซต์ต้องใส่หมวกกันน็อค
Thâa jà nâng maaw-dtooe-sai dtâawng sài mùuak-gan-náawk
If you travel by motorbike, you have to wear a helmet.

10- Bicycle

Thai noun: จักรยาน (jàk-grà-yaan)

Example:
เด็ก ๆ ชอบขี่จักรยาน
Dèk-dèk châawp khìi jàk-grà-yaan
Children like to ride bicycles.

11- Tricycle

Thai noun: รถสามล้อ (rót-sǎam-láaw)

Example:
นักท่องเที่ยวอยากนั่งรถสามล้อ
Nák-thâawng-thîiao yàak nâng rót-sǎam-láaw
The traveller wants to ride a tricycle.

Additional note: Apart from รถสามล้อ (rót-sǎam-láaw), another name Thai people use is ตุ๊กตุ๊ก (dtúk-dtúk), which is the sound of a tricycle.

12- Boat

Thai noun: เรือ (ruuea)

Example:
ที่ตลาดน้ำ แม่ค้าขายของบนเรือ
Thîi dtà-làat-nám mâae-kháa khǎai khǎawng bon ruuea
At the floating market, the seller is on the boat.

13- Airport

Thai noun: สนามบิน (sà-nǎam-bin)

Example:
เธอถึงสนามบินรึยัง
Thooe thǔeng sà-nǎam-bin rúe-yang
Have you arrived at the airport yet?

14- Train station

Thai noun: สถานีรถไฟ (sà-thǎa-nii rót-fai)

Example:
พ่อกำลังไปสถานีรถไฟ
Phâaw gam-lang bpai sà-thǎa-nii rót-fai
Dad is going to the train station now.

15- Bus stop

Thai noun: ป้ายรถเมล์ (bpâai rót-mee)

Example:
ป้ายรถเมล์อยู่ตรงไหน
Bpâai rót-mee yùu dtrong nǎi
Where is the bus stop?

16- Pier

Thai noun: ท่าเรือ (thâa-ruuea)

Example:
ท่าเรืออยู่ตรงนู้น
Thâa-ruuea yùu dtrong núun
The pier is over there.

17- Gas

Thai noun: น้ำมัน (nám-man)

Example:
พรุ่งนี้น้ำมันจะขึ้นราคา
Phrûng-níi nám-man jà khûen raa-khaa
Gas prices will be increased tomorrow.

Additional note: In Thai, น้ำมัน (nám-man) can also mean “cooking oil.”

18- Road

Thai noun: ถนน (thà-nǒn)

Example:
คอนโดอยู่ใกล้ถนนสุขุมวิท
Khaawn-doo yùu glâi thà-nǒn sù-khǔm-wít
The condo is near Sukhumvit road.

19- Traffic light

Thai noun: ไฟจราจร (fai jà-raa-jaawn)

Example:
ตอนนี้ไฟจราจรสีอะไร
Dtaawn-níi fai jà-raa-jaawn sǐi à-rai
What is the color of the traffic light now?

8. Thai Nouns about Restaurants


Do you love Thai food? Great! It’s time to learn Thai nouns you’ll need at the Thai restaurant!

1- Restaurant

Thai noun: ร้านอาหาร (ráan aa-hǎan)

Example:
คุณชอบร้านอาหารร้านไหน
Khun châawp ráan aa-hǎan ráan nǎi
Which restaurant do you like?

My Favourite Restaurant

2- Street food

Thai noun: อาหารริมทาง (aa-hǎan rim-thaang)

Example:
หลายคนชอบกินอาหารริมทางในไทย
Lǎai khon châawp gin aa-hǎan rim-thaang nai thai
Many people like street food in Thailand.

3- Table

Thai noun: โต๊ะ (dtó)

Example:
โต๊ะนี้ว่างรึเปล่า
Dtó níi wâang rúe bplào
Is this table available?

4- Customer

Thai noun: ลูกค้า (lûuk-kháa)

Example:
ลูกค้าจะมาแล้ว เตรียมพร้อมรึยัง
Lûuk-kháa jà maa láaeo dtriiam phráawm rúe yang
A customer is coming. Are you ready?

5- Waiter / Waitress

Thai noun: พนักงานเสริฟ (phá-nák-ngaan sòoep)

Example:
เขาทำงานเป็นพนักงานเสริฟ
Khǎo tham-ngaan bpen phá-nák-ngaan sòoep
He is working as a waiter.

Additional note: In Thai, พนักงานเสริฟ (phá-nák-ngaan sòoep) can be used when referring to both males and females.

6- Male cook

Thai noun: พ่อครัว (phâaw-khruua)

Example:
พ่อครัวกำลังทำอาหาร
Phâaw-khruua gam-lang tham aa-hǎan
The cook is now cooking.

7- Female cook

Thai noun: แม่ครัว (mâae-khruua)

Example:
แม่ครัวทำอาหารอร่อยดี
Mâae-khruua tham aa-hǎan a-ràauy dii
The cook is good at cooking.

8- Plate

Thai noun: จาน (jaan)

Example:
ขอจาน 2 ใบ
Khǎaw jaan sǎawng bai
I want two plates.

9- Bowl

Thai noun: ชาม (chaam)

Example:
อย่าทำชามแตกนะ
Yàa tham chaam dtàaek ná
Don’t break the bowl.

10- Spoon

Thai noun: ช้อน (cháawn)

Example:
ช้อนอยู่ไหน
Cháawn yùu nǎi
Where is the spoon?

11- Fork

Thai noun: ส้อม (sâawm)

Example:
ส้อมอยู่บนชั้น
Sâawm yùu bon chán
The fork is on the shelf.

12- Chopsticks

Thai noun: ตะเกียบ (dtà-gìiap)

Example:
บางคนใช้ตะเกียบไม่เป็น
Baang khon chái dtà-gìiap mâi bpen
Some people can’t use chopsticks.

13- Glass

Thai noun: แก้ว (gâaeo)

Example:
ซื้อแก้วให้หน่อย
Súue gâaeo hâi nàauy
Please buy a glass for me.

14- Cup

Thai noun: ถ้วย (thûuai)

Example:
ระวังนะ ถ้วยร้อนมาก
Rá-wang ná thûuai ráawn mâak
Be careful. The cup is very hot.

15- Straw

Thai noun: หลอด (làawt)

Example:
งดใช้หลอดกันเถอะ
Ngót chái làawt gan thòe
Let’s not use a straw.

16- Food

Thai noun: อาหาร (aa-hǎan)

Example:
อาหารอร่อยมาก
Aa-hǎan à-ràauy mâak
The food is very delicious.

17- Drink

Thai noun: เครื่องดื่ม (khrûueang-dùuem)

Example:
อยากได้เครื่องดื่มอุ่น ๆ
Yàak dâi khrûueang-dùuem ùn-ùn
I want a warm drink.

9. Thai Nouns about Time


Nouns 4

Being able to ask for, give, and talk about the time is extremely important. Here are the Thai nouns you’ll need to do so!

1- Today

Thai noun: วันนี้ (wan-níi)

Example:
วันนี้อากาศดี
Wan-níi aa-gàat dii
The weather is good today.

2- Tomorrow

Thai noun: พรุ่งนี้ (phrûng-níi)

Example:
พรุ่งนี้ฉันจะไปทะเล
Phrûng-níi chǎn jà bpai thá-lee
I will go to the sea tomorrow.

3- Day after tomorrow

Thai noun: มะรืน (má-ruuen)

Example:
มะรืนนี้เป็นวันเกิดของพ่อ
Má-ruuen níi bpen wan-gòoet khǎawng phâaw
The day after tomorrow is my father’s birthday.

4- Yesterday

Thai noun: เมื่อวาน (mûuea-waan)

Example:
เมื่อวานนี้ฝนตกหนัก
Mûuea-waan níi fon dtòk nàk
It rained heavily yesterday.

5- Monday

Thai noun: วันจันทร์ (wan-jan)

Example:
ฉันไม่ชอบวันจันทร์
Chǎn mâi châawp wan-jan
I don’t like Monday.

6- Tuesday

Thai noun: วันอังคาร (wan-ang-khaan)

Example:
วันอังคารหน้า อย่าลืมเอาการบ้านมานะ
Wan-ang-khaan nâa yàa luuem ao gaan-bâan maa ná
Don’t forget to bring the homework next Tuesday.

7- Wednesday

Thai noun: วันพุธ (wan-phút)

Example:
ร้านตัดผมปิดวันพุธ
Ráan dtàt phǒm bpìt wan-phút
The barber shop closes on Wednesday.

8- Thursday

Thai noun: วันพฤหัสบดี (wan-phá-rúe-hàt-sà-baaw-dii)

Example:
วันพฤหัสบดีเป็นวันครู
Wan-phá-rú-hàt-sà-baaw-dii bpen wan khruu
Thursday is Teacher’s Day.

9- Friday

Thai noun: วันศุกร์ (wan-sùk)

Example:
วันศุกร์มักรถติด
Wan-sùk mák rót dtìt
Traffic jams often happen on Friday.

10- Saturday

Thai noun: วันเสาร์ (wan-sǎo)

Example:
วันเสาร์ต้องมาทำงานมั๊ย
Wan-sǎo dtâawng maa tham-ngaan mái
Do I have to work on Saturday?

11- Sunday

Thai noun: วันอาทิตย์ (wan-aa-thít)

Example:
วันอาทิตย์ตื่นสายได้
Wan-aa-thít dtùuen sǎai dâi
I can wake up late on Sunday.

12- Day

Thai noun: วัน (wan)

Example:
เธอจะไปญี่ปุ่นกี่วัน
Thooe jà bpai yîi-bpùn gìi wan
How many days will you be in Japan?

13- Date

Thai noun: วันที่ (wan-thîi)

Example:
ต้องจ่ายเงินวันที่เท่าไหร่
Dtaawng jaai ngooen wan-thii thâo-rài
Which day do I have to make a payment?

14- Week

Thai noun: อาทิตย์ (aa-thít); สัปดาห์ (sàp-daa)

Example 1:
ฉันจะลาหยุดอาทิตย์นึง
Chǎn jà laa yùt aa-thít nueng
I will take one week off.

Example 2:
สัปดาห์นี้ เธอจะทำเสร็จมั๊ย
Sàp-daa níi thooe ja tham sèt mái
Will you finish it this week?

Additional note: In Thai, อาทิตย์ (aa-thít) and สัปดาห์ (sàp-daa) have the same meaning. However, สัปดาห์ (sàp-daa) is more formal, while อาทิตย์ (aa-thít) is used more in casual conversations.

15- Month

Thai noun: เดือน (duuean)

Example:
เดือนหน้าคือเดือนมกราคม
Duuean nâa khuue duuean-má-gà-raa-khom
Next month is January.

16- Year

Thai noun: ปี (bpii)

Example:
ปีนี้เศรษฐกิจไม่ดีเลย
Bpii níi sèet-thà-gìt mâi dii looei
This year, the economy is not good.

17- Time

Thai noun: เวลา (wee-laa)

Example:
ตอนนี้เวลากี่โมงแล้ว
Dtaawn-níi wee-laa gìi moong láaeo
What time is it?

18- Minute

Thai noun: นาที (naa-thii)

Example:
อุ่น 3 นาทีก็พอ
Ùn sǎam naa-thii gâaw phaaw
Warming it for three minutes is enough.

19- Hour

Thai noun: ชั่วโมง (chùua-moong)

Example:
หนังยาวกี่ชั่วโมง
Nǎng yaao gìi chûua-moong
How long is the movie?

10. Conclusion


There are a lot of Thai nouns you have to remember. Can you remember the new vocabulary from this list of Thai nouns? Don’t worry if you can’t remember them all in one go. It will take time. Just keep practicing!

Also, if you have questions related to Thai verbs, adjectives, or nouns, you can check out other related Thai grammar lessons on ThaiPod101.com. For example, you may find our Top 100 Thai Adjectives (please put the link to Top 100 adjectives, thank you) quite helpful.

Do the nouns in your language differ from Thai nouns? Let us know by leaving a comment below.

Once you learn all the basic Thai nouns, don’t forget to check out other lessons at ThaiPod101.com. There are tons of interesting Thai lessons, such as cracking the Thai writing system or learning about Thai society, traditions, and culture!

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Life Event Messages: Learn Happy Birthday in Thai & More!

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People are pretty much the same. We’re born, live our life, and in the end, we die. However, the life events people celebrate and experience around the world are not always the same. This is because each country has its own culture, traditions, and beliefs, which causes people the world over to pay attention to different events in life.

In this lesson, you’ll get to learn about life events in Thai. ThaiPod101.com will teach you about important life events in Thailand, what happens during those events, and what you’re supposed to say (like Happy Birthday in Thai or how to wish a happy new year in Thai). As mentioned earlier, these events are influenced by culture, tradition, and beliefs, so you’ll also get to learn more about Thai people in those respects as well.

There are many important life events in Thailand, and many Thai congratulations and condolences you can offer. And we have good news for you: all of these messages can be used for both speaking and writing!

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Table of Contents

  1. Birthdays in Thailand
  2. Graduation in Thailand
  3. Ordination Ceremony in Thailand
  4. Weddings in Thailand
  5. Pregnancy in Thai
  6. New House
  7. New Business or Business Anniversary
  8. Visiting Injured/Sick People
  9. Funerals in Thai
  10. Holidays in Thailand
  11. Conclusion

1. Birthdays in Thailand

Happy Birthday

It’s natural for people to pay attention to birthdays. After all, it marks the beginning of a person’s life. วันเกิด (wan-gòoet) is “birthday” in Thai. When it comes to birthdays, the questions that may pop into your mind are about how to write “Happy Birthday to you” in Thai or how to sing the Happy Birthday song in Thai. Don’t worry; we’ll get everything covered for you. But before we answer your questions, let’s learn more about this event from a Thai person’s perspective.

Birthdays aren’t considered a very important event in Thailand. Children may get excited for their birthdays, and celebrate with birthday cake and presents from family and friends. When it comes to adults, the level of attention people pay to birthdays in Thailand varies. Some people throw a big party to celebrate a birthday, while others just do merit and go out for a special meal with family, friends, or their lover. Still, some people don’t pay attention to this event at all; it’s just another day for them.

If you live in Thailand or happen to know Thai people and want to wish them a happy birthday in Thai, you should focus on the information below.

1- Happy Birthday in Thai

Thai language: สุขสันต์วันเกิด

Thai pronunciation: sùk-sǎn wan-gòoet

Additional note: This is a very general way to wish someone a happy birthday in Thai, and you can use this in both formal and informal situations. Still, it’s good to know that Thai people often say “Happy Birthday” in English, as well as สุขสันต์วันเกิด (sùk-sǎn wan-gòoet). Now, about the Happy Birthday song in Thai—there is none. Thai people sing the English version.

2- Happy Birthday Wishes in Thai

Thai people often wish for the birthday person to be healthy, wealthy, happy, and to have a good time. Here is a list of formal birthday wishes in Thai you can use.

Wish 1: I wish you to be healthy.

Thai language: ขอให้สุขภาพร่างกายแข็งแรง

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi sùk-khà-phâap-râang-gaai khǎaeng-raaeng

Wish 2: I wish you to be very happy.

Thai language: ขอให้มีความสุขมาก ๆ

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi mii khwaam-sùk mâak-mâak

Wish 3: I wish you to be wealthy.

Thai language: ขอให้ร่ำรวย

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi râm-ruuai

Wish 4: I wish you to have a good year.

Thai language: ขอให้ปีนี้เป็นปีที่ดี

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi bpii-níi bpen bpii thîi dii

3- Happy Birthday Wishes to Elders in Thai

In Thai culture, you can say that you wish something for younger people, but it’s not proper for younger people to do this for elders. This is because, in Thai society, young people are expected to respect people who are older. If you do wish something for an elder, there is a way to say it properly, shown below.

Thai language: ขอให้คุณพระศรีรัตนตรัยบันดาลให้…

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi khun phrá-srǐi-rát-dtà-ná-dtrai ban-daan hâi…

English translation: “May the triple gems wish you…”

Additional note: Since you can’t bless elders directly, you ask a sacred item that Thai people believe blesses them instead. In Thailand, most people are Buddhist, so Thai people often use พระศรีรัตนตรัย (phrá-srǐi-rát-dtà-ná-dtrai), which is “the triple gems.”

Happy Birthday

2. Graduation in Thailand

Basic Questions

พิธีสำเร็จการศึกษา (phí-thii sǎm-rèt gaan-sùek-sǎa), or a “graduation ceremony,” is a big event in Thailand. It’s viewed as the first success in life, as well as a sign that you’ve become an adult; after this, you’re expected to work and take care of yourself. On graduation day, graduated students receive a diploma from the Thai royal family. Family and friends normally come to congratulate graduates with flowers and gifts.

If you happen to have a Thai friend who’s about to graduate, here’s a list of graduation messages in Thai you can use.

1- Happy Graduation in Thai

Thai language: ยินดีด้วยที่เรียนจบ

Thai pronunciation: yin-dii-dûuai thîi riian jòp

Additional note: This is a very typical graduation wish you can use in both formal and informal situations.

2- I would like to congratulate to graduate.

Thai language: ขอแสดงความยินดีกับบัณฑิตใหม่

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw sà-daaeng khwaam-yin-dii gàp ban-dìt mài

Additional note: This is another congratulation in Thai for graduates you can use. This one is more formal than the previous one.

3- Graduation Wishes in Thai

In addition to the two ways of saying congratulations in Thai above, you can also say offer more good wishes to the graduate. These wishes can be used in both formal and informal situations. The basic sentence you should know is ดีใจด้วย ขอให้… (dii-jai-dûuai khǎaw-hâi), which means “I’m so happy for you. I wish (you to be)…”. You can choose one of the wishes listed below to fill the blank.

Wish 1: Be successful in work.

Thai language: ประสบความสำเร็จในการทำงาน

Thai pronunciation: bprà-sòp-khwaam-sǎm-rèt nai gaan-tham-ngaan

Wish 2: Be successful in life.

Thai language: ประสบความสำเร็จในชีวิต

Thai pronunciation: bprà-sòp-khwaam-sǎm-rèt nai chii-wít

Wish 3: A bright and shiny future is waiting for you.

Thai language: มีอนาคตที่สดใสรออยู่

Thai pronunciation: mii a-naa-khót thîi sòt-sǎi raaw yùu

3. Ordination Ceremony in Thailand

งานบวช (ngaan-bùuat) is “ordination ceremony” in Thai. For Buddhist families with son(s), the ordination ceremony is considered a big life event for them. As the head of a family in the future, it’s tradition for males to be ordained for a short period of time to learn the Buddha’s teachings so that he can use them later in life. Family and friends are invited to this ordinations ceremony. ThaiPod101.com will teach you sentences you may hear, and some you can use, to congratulate someone in formal situations.

Ordination Ceremony

1- I’m so happy for you.

Thai language: ขอร่วมอนุโมทนาบุญด้วย

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw rûuam à-nú-moo-thá-naa-bun dûuai

Additional note: This Thai message is quite special. It’s used in Buddhism-related situations only. In an ordination ceremony, Thai people use this phrase to show that they’re happy for what you’re doing (getting ordained to be a monk).

2- I hope you will be able to learn Buddha’s teachings well.

Thai language: ขอให้ศึกษาพระธรรมให้เต็มที่

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi sùek-sǎa phrá-tham hâi dtem-thîi

Additional note: You can use this phrase in addition to saying that you’re happy they’re going to study as a monk.

3- You’re becoming a monk so your parents can go to heaven.

Thai language: บวชให้พ่อแม่ได้เกาะชายผ้าเหลืองขึ้นสวรรค์

Thai pronunciation: bùuat hâi phâaw-mâae dâi gàw chaai-phâa-lǔueang khûen sà-wǎn

Additional note: This isn’t a message you say to the host, but is rather a famous saying related to the ordination ceremony which reflects Thai beliefs regarding this matter. Its literal meaning is “ordain so parents can hold the rim of yellow clothes to heaven.” Here’s an explanation: Thai monks have their own outfit, which is a yellow robe. In the ordination ceremony, a new monk wears the yellow robe for the first time, and parents can hold on to the rim of the yellow outfit to the heaven.

4. Weddings in Thailand

Marriage Proposal

Like the rest of the world, a wedding is an important life event in Thailand. Most people, especially women, want to have a wedding ceremony. Some wedding ceremonies are pretty small, and only family and close friends are invited. Some wedding ceremonies, however, can be very big with up to a thousand guests. Normally, at the reception of the wedding, there’s a book for guests to write their wishes to the bride and groom in. If you’re going to a Thai wedding, here are wedding messages in Thai, and other Thai wedding congratulations, you can use.

1- Congratulations on your wedding.

Thai language: ยินดีกับการแต่งงานด้วย

Thai pronunciation: yin-dii gàp gaan-dtàaeng-ngaan dûuai

Additional note: This is a very general way to congratulate the wedding. You can use this in both formal and informal situations.

2- Wedding Wish from an Elder

In Thai society, when an elder offers good wishes to a younger bride and groom, they often use these wishes.

Wish 1: Wish you to love each other until you are old.

Thai language: ขอให้รักกันจนแก่เฒ่า ถือไม้เท้ายอดทองกระบองยอดเพชร

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi rák-gan jon gàae-thâo thǔue-mái-tháo-yâawt-thaawng-grà-baawng- yâawt-phét

Wish 2: Wish you to be together forever and always forgive each other.

Thai language: ขอให้รักกันนาน ๆ หนักนิดเบาหน่อยก็ให้อภัยกันนะ

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi rák gan naan-naan ngàk-nít-bao-nàauy gâaw hâi à-phai gan ná

Wish 3: Wish you to have a lot of children.

Thai language: ขอให้มีลูกเต็มบ้านมีหลานเต็มเมือง

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi mii lûuk dtem bâan mii-lǎan dtem muueang

3- Wedding Wishes from Friends

Wishes from friends are often more playful and informal. Here are the most popular ones.

Wish 1: I’m so happy that you are already married.

Thai language: ดีใจด้วย ขายออกแล้วนะ

Thai pronunciation: dii-jai dûuai khǎai àawk láaeo ná

Wish 2: I’m so happy for you and wish you eternal love.

Thai language: ดีใจด้วย รักกันนาน ๆ นะ

Thai pronunciation: dii-jai dûuai rák gan naan-naan ná

5. Pregnancy in Thai

Talking about Age

When you learn that your beloved one is pregnant, naturally, you’re happy for them. In some countries, they do baby showers to congratulate them. However, in Thailand, we don’t do that. Once the new mother gives birth, you go and visit them.

Then, a month after the baby is born, you do an event called ทำขวัญเดือน (tham-kwǎn-duuean) or โกนผมไฟ (goon-phǒm-fai). In this event, the family wishes good things for the baby and celebrates that the baby is safe and healthy. It’s the first time that the baby’s hair is cut. However, only family partakes in this event.

As a friend, if you want to congratulate your Thai friend on their pregnancy or childbirth, you can send them these messages.

1- Wish both mother and baby to be healthy.

Thai language: ขอให้แข็งแรงทั้งคุณแม่และลูก

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi khǎaeng-raaeng tháng khun-mâae láe lûuk

Additional note: This is a Thai wish for both the mother and baby, that you say to the mother. It’s quite common and can be used in both formal and informal situations.

2- Be good kids for mom and dad.

Thai language: เป็นเด็กดีของพ่อแม่นะ

Thai pronunciation: bpen dèk dii khǎawng phâaw-mâae ná

Additional note: This is a Thai wish you say to the baby, although the baby may not understand you yet. When Thai people speak this, they normally use a kind tone.

3- Wish your baby to be healthy and grow up to be a good child.

Thai language: ขอให้ลูกสุขภาพแข็งแรงและเป็นเด็กดี

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi lûuk sùk-khà-phâap khǎaeng-raaeng láe bpen dèk dii

Additional note: This is a Thai wish for the baby that you say to the mother. It’s quite common and can be used in both formal and informal situations.

Happy Baby

6. New House

Owning a house or condo in Thailand is viewed as another success. The owner of the house often hosts an event called งานทำบุญขึ้นบ้านใหม่ (ngaan tham-bun-khûen-bâan-mài), which means “merit making for new house,” to celebrate. They may also invite monks to bless the house so that it’s a nice place to live. Family and friends are normally invited to this event.

1- Congratulations on your new house.

Thai language: ยินดีด้วยที่ได้ขึ้นบ้านใหม่

Thai pronunciation: yin-dii dûuai thîi dâi khûen bâan-mài

Additional note: This is a very general way to congratulate the owner of a new house. You can use this in both formal and informal situations.

2- This is a good house, making the occupant rich.

Thai language: บ้านนี้ดี อยู่แล้วรวย

Thai pronunciation: bâan níi dii yùu láaeo ruuai

Additional note: This is one of the wishes Thai people often write down on a card, which they give to the owner of the house.

3- Occupants in this house will be happy and rich.

Thai language: บ้านนี้อยู่แล้ว ร่มเย็นเป็นสุข ร่ำรวย

Thai pronunciation: bâan níi yùu láaeo rôm-yen-bpen-sùk râm-ruuai

Additional note: This is another wish that Thai people often write down on a card, which they give to the owner of the house.

7. New Business or Business Anniversary

When Thai people start a new business or have a business anniversary, they sometimes invite a monk to bless their business. They believe it will bring luck and help make their business successful. Family, friends, and business partners are invited. Here’s a list of best wishes in Thai you can say to congratulate them.

1- General Thai Message on New Business / Business Anniversary

Wish 1: Good luck! Good luck! Good luck!

Thai language: เฮง เฮง เฮง

Thai pronunciation: heng heng heng

Additional note: This is one of the most popular wishes for others when it comes to business. Actually, it comes from Chinese.

Wish 2: Congratulations.

Thai language: ยินดีด้วยนะ

Thai pronunciation: yin-dii dûuai ná

2- Wishes for a New Business

Wish 1: Congratulations on your business, may it go well.

Thai language: ยินดีด้วยกับธุรกิจใหม่ ขอให้กิจการรุ่งเรือง

Thai pronunciation: yin-dii dûuai gàp thú-rá-gìt mài khǎaw hâi gìt-jà-gaan rûng-ruueang

Wish 2: Congratulations on your business, may the sales be very good.

Thai language: ยินดีด้วยกับธุรกิจใหม่ ขอให้ค้าขายรุ่งเรือง

Thai pronunciation: yin-dii dûuai gàp thú-rá-gìt mài khǎaw hâi kháa-khǎai rûng-ruueang

3- Wishing a Happy Business Anniversary

Wish 1: May your business be even more successful.

Thai language: ขอให้ประสบความสำเร็จยิ่ง ๆ ขึ้นไป

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi bprà-sòp-khwaam-sǎm-rèt yîng-yîng-khûen-bpai

Wish 2: May you be richer.

Thai language: ขอให้ร่ำรวยยิ่ง ๆ ขึ้นไป

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi râm-ruuai yîng-yîng-khûen-bpai

8. Visiting Injured/Sick People

Being sick is an inevitable event in life. And when you’re sick or injured, encouragement from family, friends, and people who love you can always make you feel better. Thai people are no different.

When you’re sick, you normally get encouraging messages from those who love you. If you get admitted to the hospital, those who love you often come to visit with some fruit and nourishing food or drinks. If you visit Thai people in the hospital or have a sick friend, the following Thai condolences and encouragement phrases will be useful for you. You can use them in both formal and informal situations.

1- Get well soon.

Thai language: หายป่วยเร็ว ๆ นะ

Thai pronunciation: hǎai bpùuai rew-rew ná

Additional note: This is a general message that Thai people often say or write down on a card for someone who is sick or injured.

2- Get a lot of rest and get well soon.

Thai language: พักผ่อนเยอะ ๆ หายป่วยเร็ว ๆ นะ

Thai pronunciation: phák-phàawn yóe-yóe hǎai bpùuai rew-rew ná

3- Take care of yourself and get well soon.

Thai language: ดูแลตัวเองดี ๆ หายป่วยเร็ว ๆ นะ

Thai pronunciation: duu-laae dtuua-eeng dii-dii hǎai bpùuai rew-rew ná

9. Funerals in Thai

งานศพ (ngaan-sòp), or a “funeral,” is the chance for the living to pay respect to the dead, as well as comfort the family of the deceased. คำอาลัย (kham aa-lai) is the “message to the dead” in Thai. If you go to a funeral in Thailand, here are some funeral messages in Thai, and other condolences in Thai, you should know.

1- May you go to heaven.

Thai language 1: ขอให้ไปสู่สุคติ

Thai pronunciation 1: khǎaw hâi bpai sùu sùk-khà-dtì

Thai language 2: ขอให้ไปที่ชอบ ๆ นะ

Thai pronunciation 2: khǎaw hâi bpai thîi-châawp-thîi-châawp ná

Additional note: This is a message that Thai people often say to the deceased at a funeral. Both sentences have the same meaning. However, the first one is more formal.

2- Message to the death (asking for forgiveness).

It’s impossible for people who know each other to never do, think, or say bad things to each other, regardless of intention. As most Thai people are Buddhist, we believe in a next life. Thus, it’s proper to ask for forgiveness and say that you forgive the deceased as well. So you should know these two sentences.

Message 1: Asking the deceased for forgiveness

Thai language: กรรมใดที่เคยทำไป อโหสิกรรมให้ด้วย

Thai pronunciation: gam-dai thîi khooei tham bpai à-hǒo-sì-gam hâi rao dûuai

Message 2: Forgiving the deceased for bad things he/she did to you

Thai language: ถ้าเคยทำอะไรที่ไม่ดีไว้ เราอโหสิกรรมให้

Thai pronunciation: thâa khooei tham à-rai thîi mâi dii wái rao à-hǒo-sì-gam hâi

3- Condolences in Thai

Message 1: My condolences for your loss. (Formal)

Thai language: ขอแสดงความเสียใจด้วย

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw sà-daaeng kwaam-sǐia-jai dûuai

Message 2: My condolences for your loss. (Informal)

Thai language: เสียใจด้วย

Thai pronunciation: sǐia-jai dûuai

10. Holidays in Thailand

There are a lot of holidays in Thailand. Thai people celebrate many foreign holidays such as Valentine’s Day, Christmas, and Halloween. However, luckily, the holiday greetings in Thai, or holiday messages for foreign holidays, are no different from those used in other countries. Thai people often say those in English, such as “Merry Christmas” and “Happy Valentine’s Day.”

Still, ThaiPod101.com thinks you should learn some holiday wishes in Thai. In particular, the New Year holiday in Thailand is quite interesting.

In Thailand, people kind of celebrate the New Year three times a year: New Year’s Day, the Chinese New Year Day, and the Thai New Year Day. So you should learn some of the most common Thai New Year congratulations. The Thai wishes below can be used in both formal and informal situations.

1- Happy New Year Wishes in Thai

Wish 1: Happy New Year

Thai language: สุขสันต์วันปีใหม่

Thai pronunciation: sùk-sǎn wan-bpii-mài

Wish 2: Hello New Year

Thai language: สวัสดีปีใหม่

Thai pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii bpii-mài

Wish 3: May this year be full of happiness and prosperity.

Thai language: ขอให้มีแต่ความสุขความเจริญ

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi mii dtàae khwaam-sùk khwaam-jà-rooen

Wish 4: May this be a good year.

Thai language: ขอให้ปีนี้เป็นปีที่ดี

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi bpii-níi bpen bpii thîi dii

2- Happy Chinese New Year Wishes in Thai

Wish 1: In this new year, may all your wishes come true. I wish you to be happy and rich all year.

Thai language: ซิงเจียยู่อี๋ ซิงนี้ฮวดใช้

Thai pronunciation: sin-jiia-yûu-ìi sin-níi-hûuat-chái

Additional note: This wish is Chinese. Despite saying this on the Chinese New Year, Thai people don’t really know what it means. They just know that they’re supposed to say this on that day.

Wish 2: Good luck! Good luck! Good luck!

Thai language: เฮง เฮง เฮง

Thai pronunciation: heng heng heng

Additional note: You may recognize this wish because it’s also used to wish a new business well, or to congratulate a business anniversary. It can also be used as a wish for the Chinese New Year as well.

3- Happy Thai New Year Wishes in Thai

Wish 1: Happy Songkran Day

Thai language: สุขสันต์วันสงกรานต์

Thai pronunciation: sùk-sǎn wan sǒng-graan

Wish 2: Hello Thai New Year

Thai language: สวัสดีปีใหม่ไทย

Thai pronunciation: sà-wàt-dii bpii-mài-thai

Wish 3: May this year be full of happiness.

Thai language: ขอให้มีแต่ความสุข

Thai pronunciation: khǎaw hâi mii dtàae khwaam-sùk

Songkran Holiday

11. Conclusion

Congratulations for reaching the conclusion. We hope you can use all these wishes and messages for life events in real situations. Are they different from yours? Does your country have the same life events? Leave a comment below to let us know.

And as always, don’t forget to visit ThaiPod101.com to learn interesting and fun Thai lessons. As we’ve just talked about holidays, you can learn more about national Thai holidays or the Songkran holiday in Thailand. Know that your hard work will pay off, and with the help of ThaiPod101, you’ll be speaking like a native in no time!

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List of Thai Adjectives You Must Know

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Why should you learn Thai adjectives?

The adjective is a very important part of any language. It enables clear and detailed communication, and by using Thai adjectives, you can communicate in Thai like a native. Thus, learning Thai adjectives is a must for all Thai learners.

Both Thai adjectives and adverbs are used to add detail to a sentence, but in this article, we’ll only focus on Thai adjectives. Let’s start our lesson by answering the question, “How do you say adjective in Thai?”

คำคุณศัพท์ (kham khun-ná-sàp) is “adjective” in Thai, and like in every language, adjectives are descriptive words. This article will make learning descriptive Thai adjectives easy!

For your information, there are actually many types of Thai adjectives, but there’s no need to remember adjectives by type. Below is our list of adjectives in Thai, categorized into groups. But first, some information on how to use Thai language adjectives.

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Table of Contents

  1. How to Use Thai Adjectives
  2. Describing Dimensions, Sizes, Distance & Frequency
  3. Thai Adjectives for Describing Value
  4. Thai Adjectives for Describing Feeling and Sense
  5. Thai Adjectives for Describing Personality and Feelings
  6. Thai Adjectives for Describing Speed, Difficulty & Importance
  7. Thai Adjectives for Describing Color
  8. Thai Adjectives for Describing Shape & Texture
  9. Thai Food Adjectives: Describing Taste
  10. Thai Adjectives for Describing Situations
  11. Describing Physical Traits, Conditions & Appearance
  12. Conclusion

1. How to Use Thai Adjectives

Most Common Adjectives

Let’s learn about Thai adjectives and how to use them. Fortunately, apart from remembering adjectives in Thai vocabulary, how to use Thai adjectives is very easy. When Thai people want to describe something, the pattern they use is “noun + adjective.” For example, ผู้หญิงสวย (phûu-yǐng sǔuai) is “beautiful woman.” Below is a more detailed explanation.

  • ผู้หญิง (phûu-yǐng) is “woman” in Thai.
  • สวย (sǔuai) is “beautiful” in Thai.
  • Combining both words, with the noun first and adjective second, we get ผู้หญิงสวย (phûu-yǐng sǔuai), which means “beautiful woman.”

Sometimes, Thai people put a ลักษณะนาม (lák-sà-nà-naam), or “classifier,” in between the noun and adjective. ลักษณะนาม (lák-sà-nà-naam) is a noun used to describe the feature or structure of the noun in front.

Now that you have the basics down, here’s our Thai adjectives list!

2. Describing Dimensions, Sizes, Distance & Frequency

Improve Pronunciation

The first group of Thai adjectives you should learn are those that describe the physical features of an object, distance, and frequency. These are some of the most common Thai adjectives, and you’ll do well to learn these.

1- Big

Thai adjective: ใหญ่ (yài)

Example:
บ้านหลังใหญ่มักราคาแพง
Bâan lǎng yài mák raa-khaa phaaeng
“Big houses are often expensive.”

Opposite word: เล็ก (lék), which means “small” in Thai.

2- Small

Thai adjective: เล็ก (lék)

Example:
ฉันชอบกระเป๋าเล็ก
Chǎn châawp grà-bpǎo bai lék lék
“I like small bags.”

Opposite word: ใหญ่ (yài), which means “big” in Thai.

3- Wide

Thai adjective: กว้าง (gwâang)

Example 1:
ห้องนอนกว้างมาก ฉันชอบ
Hâawng-naawn gwâang mâak chǎn châawp
“The bedroom is very wide. I like it.”

Example 2:
ถนนเส้นใหม่กว้างดี
Thà-nǒn sêen mài gwâang dii
“The new road is wide.”

Opposite word: แคบ (khâaep), which means “narrow” in Thai.

Additional note: Thai people also use the word “wide” to describe a big area instead of using the word “big.”

4- Narrow

Thai adjective: แคบ (khâaep)

Example 1:
ห้องครัวแคบมาก วางของพอได้ยังไง
Hâawng-khruua khâaep mâak waang khǎawng phaaw dâi yang-ngai
“The kitchen is so narrow. How can you put everything in it?”

Example 2:
ทางเข้าบ้านเธอแคบจัง
Thaang khâo bâan thooe khâaep jang
“The way to your house is so narrow.”

Opposite word: กว้าง (gwâang), which means “wide” in Thai.

Additional note: Similar to “wide,” Thai people also use the word “narrow” to describe a small area instead of using the word “small.”

5- Thick

Thai adjective: หนา (nǎa)

Example:
หนังสือเล่มนั้นหนาเกินจะอ่านไหว
Nǎng-sǔue lêem nán nǎa gooen jà àan wǎi
“That book is too thick to read.”

Opposite word: บาง (baang), which means “thin” in Thai.

6- Thin

Thai adjective: บาง (baang)

Example:
ใส่เสื้อบางมากจะทำให้เป็นหวัด
Sài sûuea baang mâak jà tham hâi bpen wàt
“Wearing clothes that are too thin will make you catch a cold.”

Opposite word: หนา (nǎa), which means “thick” in Thai.

7- Tall / High

Thai adjective: สูง (sǔung)

Example:
ฉันไม่ชอบขึ้นบนตึกสูง
Chǎn mâi châawp khûen dtùek sǔung
“I don’t like to go up on high buildings.”

Opposite word: เตี้ย (dtîia) and ต่ำ (dtàm), which mean “low” in Thai.

8- Short

Thai adjective: เตี้ย (dtîia)

Example:
น้องเตี้ยเพราะไม่ชอบดื่มนม
Náawng dtîia phráw mâi châawp dùuem nom
“My brother is short because he doesn’t like drinking milk.”

Opposite word: สูง (sǔung), which means “high” in Thai.

9- Low

Thai adjective: ต่ำ (dtàm)

Example:
คะแนนต่ำสุดคือสิบคะแนน
Khá-naaen dtàm sùt khuue sìp khá-naaen
“The lowest score is ten.”

Opposite word: สูง (sǔung), which means “high” in Thai.

10- Heavy

Thai adjective: หนัก (nàk)

Example:
กล่องหนักมาก ฉันแบกไม่ไหว
Glàawng nàk mâak chǎn bàaek mâi wǎi
“The box is very heavy. I can’t carry it.”

Opposite word: เบา (bao), which means “light” in Thai.

11- Light

Thai adjective: เบา (bao)

Example:
สมุดมักเบากว่าหนังสือ
Sà-mùt mák bao gwàa nǎng-sǔue
“Notebooks are usually lighter than books.”

Opposite word: หนัก (nàk), which means “heavy” in Thai.

12- Close

Thai adjective: ใกล้ (glâi)

Example:
บ้านของฉันอยู่ใกล้ห้างสรรพสินค้า
Bâan khǎawng chǎn yùu glâi hâang sàp-phá-sǐn-kháa
“My house is near (close to) a department store.”

Opposite word: ไกล (glai), which means “far” in Thai.

13- Far

Thai adjective: ไกล (glai)

Example:
บ้านของฉันอยู่ไกลโรงพยาบาล
Bâan khǎawng chǎn yùu glâi roong-phá-yaa-baan
“My house is far from the hospital.”

Opposite word: ใกล้ (glâi), which means “close” in Thai.

14- Often

Thai adjective: บ่อย (bàauy)

Example:
แม่มากินก๋วยเตี๋ยวร้านนี้บ่อย
Mâae maa gin gǔuai-dtǐiao ráan níi bàauy
“My mother often has noodles at this place.”

Opposite word: นาน ๆ ที (naan-naan-thii), which means “rarely” in Thai.

15- Rarely

Thai adjective: นาน ๆ ที (naan-naan-thii)

Example:
เพราะเป็นคนขี้เกียจ นาน ๆ ที แก้วจะทำความสะอาดห้องที
Phráw bpen khon khîi-gìiat naan-naan-thii gâaew jà tham-khwaam-sà-àat hâawng thii
“Because she is lazy, Gaaew rarely cleans her room.”

Opposite word: บ่อย (bàauy), which means “often” in Thai.

16- Many / Much

Thai adjective: มาก (mâak) / เยอะ (yóe)

Example 1:
กระเป๋าหนักมากเพราะมีของจำนวนมากในนั้น
Grà-bpǎo nàk mâak phráw mii khǎawng jam-nuuan mâak nai nán
“The bag is so heavy because there are many things in there.”

Example 2:
อาหารจานนี้มีสมุนไพรเยอะ
Aa-hǎan jaan níi mii sà-mǔn-phrai yóe
“There are many herbs in this dish.”

Opposite word: น้อย (náauy) and นิดเดียว (nít-diiao), which mean “few” or “little” in Thai.

Additional note: Whether you use มาก (mâak) or เยอะ (yóe) depends on the noun the adjective describes.

17- Few / Little

Thai adjective: น้อย (náauy) / นิดเดียว (nít-diiao)

Example 1:
บนชั้นมีของน้อย
Bon chán mii khǎawng náauy
“There are few things on the shelf.”

Example 2:
บนชั้นมีของนิดเดียว
Bon chán mii khǎawng nít-diiao
“There are few things on the shelf.”

Opposite word: มาก (mâak) and เยอะ (yóe), which mean “many” or “much” in Thai.

Additional note: These two words are pretty much the same. You can use น้อย (náauy) instead of นิดเดียว (nít-diiao) and vice versa.

3. Thai Adjectives for Describing Value

Reading

The second group of Thai adjectives you should learn are words used to describe value in Thai.

1- Good

Thai adjective: ดี (dii)

Example:
วันนี้อากาศดีมาก
Wan-níi aa-gàat dii mâak
“The weather is very good today.”

Opposite word: ไม่ดี (mâi dii), แย่ (yâae), and เลว (leeo), which mean “bad” in Thai.

Additional note: ดี (dii) can be used to describe both quality and behavior.

2- Great

Thai adjective: เยี่ยม (yîiam)

Example:
เธอลองรึยัง มันเยี่ยมมาก
Thooe laawng rúe yang man yîiam mâak
“Have you tried this yet? It is great.”

Opposite word: ไม่ดี (mâi dii), แย่ (yâae), and เลว (leeo), which mean “bad” in Thai.

Additional note: เยี่ยม (yîiam) is used to describe quality only.

3- Perfect

Thai adjective: เลิศ (lôoet)

Example:
มันเลิศมาก
Man lôoet mâak
“This is perfect.”

Opposite word: ไม่ดี (mâi dii), แย่ (yâae), and เลว (leeo), which mean “bad” in Thai.

Additional note: Thai people also use the English word “perfect” in conversation instead of using เลิศ (lôoet). And for your information, เลิศ (lôoet) is used to describe quality only.

4- Bad

Thai adjective: ไม่ดี (mâi dii) / แย่ (yâae) / เลว (leeo)

Example 1:
อย่าทำแบบนี้ ไม่ดีเลย
Yàa tham bàaep-níi mâi dii looei
“Don’t do this. It is bad.”

Example 2:
สินค้าร้านนี้แย่มาก จะไม่ซื้ออีกแล้ว
Sǐn-kháa ráan níi yâae mâak jà mâi súue ìik láaeo
“The product from this shop is very bad. I won’t buy it again.”

Example 3:
เขาเป็นคนเลว
Khǎo bpen khon leeo
“He is a bad person.”

Opposite word: ดี (dii), เยี่ยม (yîiam), and เลิศ (lôoet), which mean “good,” “great,” and “perfect” respectively in Thai.

Additional note: ไม่ดี (mâi dii) and แย่ (yâae) can be used to describe both quality and behavior. เลว (leeo) is used to describe quality only. Of these three words, ไม่ดี (mâi dii) can be used in both formal and informal situations. On the other hand, แย่ (yâae) and เลว (leeo) are used more in spoken language.

5- Sucks (Bad)

Thai adjective: ห่วย (hùuai)

Example:
อาหารรสชาติห่วยมาก
Aa-hǎan rót-châat hùuai mâak
The food tastes sucky (bad).

Opposite word: ดี (dii), เยี่ยม (yîiam), and เลิศ (lôoet) which mean “good,” “great,” and “perfect” respectively in Thai.

Additional note: ห่วย (hùuai) is used to describe quality only. And similar to its English meaning, it’s informal spoken language.

4. Thai Adjectives for Describing Feeling and Sense

The third group of Thai adjectives are words used to describe feeling and sense in Thai.

1- Cold

Thai adjective: หนาว (nǎao)

Example:
ฉันไม่ชอบอากาศหนาว
Chǎn mâi châawp aa-gàat nǎao
“I don’t like cold weather.”

Opposite word: ร้อน (ráawn), which means “hot” in Thai.

2- Hot

Thai adjective: ร้อน (ráawn)

Example:
กาแฟร้อนนะ ระวังด้วย
Gaa-faae ráawn ná rá-wang dûuai
“The coffee is hot so be careful.”

Opposite word: หนาว (nǎao), which means “cold” in Thai.

3- Chilly

Thai adjective: เย็น (yen)

Example:
เชียงใหม่ตอนนี้อากาศเย็นสบาย น่าไปเที่ยว
Chiiang-mài dtaawn-níi aa-gàat yen sà-baai nâa bpai thìiao
“The weather in Chiiangmai is chilly now. It is a good time to travel there.”

Opposite word: อุ่น (ùn), which means “warm” in Thai.

4- Warm

Thai adjective: อุ่น (ùn)

Example:
ฉันชอบดื่มชาอุ่น
Chǎn châawp dùuem chaa ùn-ùn
“I like to drink warm tea.”

Opposite word: เย็น (yen), which means “chilly” in Thai.

5- Hard

Thai adjective: แข็ง (khǎaeng)

Example:
ขนมปังนี้แข็งมาก กินไปได้ยังไง
Khà-nǒm bpang níi khǎaeng mâak gin bpai dâi yang-ngai
“This bread is so hard. How can you eat it?”

Opposite word: นิ่ม (nîm), which means “soft” in Thai.

6- Soft

Thai adjective: นิ่ม (nîm)

Example:
ฉันชอบหมอนที่นิ่มมาก ๆ
Chǎn châawp mǎawn thîi nîm mâak-mâak
“I like very soft pillows.”

Opposite word: แข็ง (khǎaeng), which means “hard” in Thai.

7- Comfortable

Thai adjective: สบาย (sà-baai)

Example:
เก้าอี้ตัวนี้นั่งสบายมาก
Gâo-îi dtuua níi nâng sà-baai mâak
“This chair is very comfortable.”

Opposite word: อึดอัด (ùet-àt), which means “uncomfortable” in Thai.

8- Painful

Thai adjective: เจ็บ (jèp)

Example:
ท่ายืดตัวนั้นดูเจ็บมาก
Thâa yûuet dtuua nán duu jèp mâak
“That stretch posture looks so painful.”

Stretching Posture

9- Uncomfortable

Thai adjective: อึดอัด (ùet-àt)

Example:
ห้องเล็กแค่นั้น ถ้าอยู่กันเกินสองคนต้องอึดอัดมากแน่ ๆ
Hâawng lék khâae nán thâa yùu gan gooen sǎawng khon dtâawng ùet-àt mâak nâae-nâae
“That room is so small. If more than two people live there, it will be very uncomfortable.”

Opposite word: สบาย (sà-baai), which means “comfortable” in Thai.

10- Fresh

Thai adjective: สดชื่น (sòt-chûuen)

Example:
อากาศร้อนแบบนี้ ถ้าดื่มน้ำผลไม้เย็น ๆ ต้องสดชื่นมากแน่ ๆ
Aa-gaat ráawn bàaep níi thâa dùuem nám phǒn-lá-mái yen-yen dtâawng sòt-chûuen mâak nâae-nâae
“Drinking cold juice in this hot weather will be very fresh (refreshing).”

Opposite word: เหนื่อย (nùueai), which means “tired” in Thai.

11- Energetic

Thai adjective: กระปรี้กระเปร่า (grà-bprîi-grà-bprào)

Example:
ออกกำลังกายแล้วทำให้รู้สึกกระปรี้กระเปร่า
Àawk-gam-lang-gaai láaeo tham hâi rúu-sùek grà-bprîi-grà-bprào
“Exercise makes you feel energetic.”

Opposite word: เหนื่อย (nùueai), which means “tired” in Thai.

12- Tired

Thai adjective: เหนื่อย (nùueai)

Example:
ฉันทำงานมาสิบชั่วโมงแล้ว ตอนนี้เหนื่อยมาก
Chǎn tham-ngaan maa sìp chûua-moong láaeo dtaawn-níi nùueai mâak
“I have worked for more than ten hours, I’m so tired now.”

Opposite word: สดชื่น (sòt-chûuen) and กระปรี้กระเปร่า (grà-bprîi-grà-bprào), which mean “fresh” and “energetic” respectively in Thai.

5. Thai Adjectives for Describing Personality and Feelings

The fourth group of Thai adjectives you should learn are words used to describe a person in Thai, or personality Thai adjectives.

1- Diligent

Thai adjective: ขยัน (khà-yǎn)

Example:
นักเรียนคนนี้ขยันมาก
Nák-riian khon níi khà-yǎn mâak
“This student is so diligent.”

Opposite word: ขี้เกียจ (khîi-gìiat), which means “lazy” in Thai.

2- Lazy

Thai adjective: ขี้เกียจ (khîi-gìiat)

Example:
พ่อไม่ชอบคนขี้เกียจ
Phâaw mâi châawp khon khîi-gìiat
“My father doesn’t like lazy people.”

Opposite word: ขยัน (khà-yǎn), which means “diligent” in Thai.

3- Kind

Thai adjective: ใจดี (jai-dii)

Example:
แม่เป็นคนใจดี
Mâae bpen khon jai-dii
“My mother is kind.”

Opposite word: ใจร้าย (jai-ráai), which means “mean” in Thai.

4- Mean

Thai adjective: ใจร้าย (jai-ráai)

Example:
เด็ก ๆ มักไม่ชอบแม่มดใจร้ายในการ์ตูน
Dèk-dèk mák mâi châawp mâae-mòt jai-ráai nai gaa-dtuun
“Children often dislike mean witches in cartoons.”

Opposite word: ใจดี (jai-dii), which means “kind” in Thai.

5- Composed

Thai adjective: ใจเย็น (jai-yen)

Example:
นอกจากใจดีแล้ว แม่เป็นคนใจเย็นมาก
Nâawk jàak jai-dii láaeo mâae bpen khon jai-yen mâak
“Apart from being kind, my mother is also very composed.”

Opposite word: ใจร้อน (jai-ráawn), which means “impetuous” in Thai.

6- Impetuous

Thai adjective: ใจร้อน (jai-ráawn)

Example:
น้ำเป็นคนใจร้อน
Nâm bpen khon jai-ráawn
“Nam is impetuous.”

Opposite word: ใจเย็น (jai-yen), which means “composed” in Thai.

7- Polite

Thai adjective: สุภาพ (sù-phâap)

Example:
เข้าวัดต้องแต่งตัวสุภาพ
Khâo wát dtâawng dtàaeng-dtuua sù-phâap
“You have to dress politely when going to the temple.”

Opposite word: หยาบคาย (yàap-khaai), which means “rude” in Thai.

8- Rude

Thai adjective: หยาบคาย (yàap-khaai)

Example:
อย่าทำตัวหยาบคาย
Yàa tham dtuua yàap-khaai
“Don’t be rude.”

Opposite word: สุภาพ (sù-phâap), which means “polite” in Thai.

9- Generous

Thai adjective: ใจกว้าง (jai-gwâang)

Example:
ทุกคนชอบแป้งเพราะเธอเป็นคนใจกว้าง
Thúuk-khon châawp bpâaeng phráw thooe bpen khon jai-gwâang
“Everyone likes Bpaaeng because she is generous.”

Opposite word: ขี้เหนียว (khîi-nǐiao), which means “stingy” in Thai.

10- Stingy

Thai adjective: ขี้เหนียว (khîi-nǐiao)

Example:
ต่ายรวยเพราะขี้เหนียว
Dtàai ruuai phráw khîi-nǐiao
“Dtaai is rich because she is stingy.”

Opposite word: ใจกว้าง (jai-gwâang), which means “generous” in Thai.

11- Funny

Thai adjective: ตลก (dtà-lòk)

Example:
แจนชอบเล่าเรื่องตลก
Jaaen châawp lâo rûueang dtà-lòk
“Jaaen likes to tell funny stories.”

12- Boring

Thai adjective: น่าเบื่อ (nâa-bùuea)

Example:
หนังสือเล่มนั้นน่าเบื่อมาก
Nǎang-sǔue lêm nán nâa-bùuea mâak
“That book is so boring.”

13- Optimistic

Thai adjective: มองโลกในแง่ดี (maawng lôok nai ngâae dii)

Example:
ตาลมองโลกในแง่ดีเสมอ
Dtaan maawng lôok nai ngâae dii sà-mǒoe
“Thaan is always optimistic.”

Opposite word: มองโลกในแง่ร้าย (maawng lôok nai ngâae ráai), which means “pessimistic” in Thai.

14- Pessimistic

Thai adjective: มองโลกในแง่ร้าย (maawng lôok nai ngâae ráai)

Example:
เราไม่ควรมองโลกในแง่ร้าย
Rao mâi khuuan maawng lôok nai ngâae ráai
“We shouldn’t be pessimistic.”

Opposite word: มองโลกในแง่ดี (maawng lôok nai ngâae dii), which means “optimistic” in Thai.

15- Friendly

Thai adjective: เป็นมิตร (bpen-mít)

Example:
เธอเป็นมิตรกับทุกคน
Thooe bpen-mít gàp thúk-khon
“She is friendly with everyone.”

Opposite word: หยิ่ง (yìng), which means “arrogant” in Thai.

Additional note: Thai people also use the English word “friendly” in conversations, instead of using เป็นมิตร (bpen-mít).

Friendly People

16- Arrogant

Thai adjective: หยิ่ง (yìng)

Example:
ไม่มีใครอยากเป็นเพื่อนกับคนหยิ่ง
Mâi mii khrai yàak bpen phûuean gàp khon yìng
“No one wants to be friends with arrogant people.”

Opposite word: เป็นมิตร (bpen-mít), which means “friendly” in Thai.

17- Loud

Thai adjective: เสียงดัง (sǐiang dang)

Example:
อย่าเสียงดัง เด็ก ๆ กำลังนอน
Yàa sǐiang dang dèk-dèk gam-lang naawn
“Don’t be so loud. The children are now sleeping.”

Opposite word: เงียบ (ngîiap), which means “quiet” in Thai.

18- Quiet

Thai adjective: เงียบ (ngîiap)

Example:
ยิ้มเป็นคนเงียบ
Yím bpen khon ngîiap-ngîiap
“Yim is a quiet person.”

Opposite word: เสียงดัง (sǐiang dang), which means “loud” in Thai.

19- Confident

Thai adjective: มั่นใจ (mân-jai)

Example:
พ่อเป็นคนมั่นใจในตนเอง
Phâaw bpen khon mân-jai nai dton-eeng
“My father is confident in himself.”

20- Shy

Thai adjective: ขี้อาย (khîi-aai)

Example:
ตอนเด็ก ๆ ฉันเป็นคนขี้อายมาก
Dtaawn dèk-dèk chǎn bpen khon khîi-aai mâak
“I was very shy when I was young.”

21- Happy

Thai adjective: มีความสุข (mii khwaam-sùk)

Example:
เธอมีความสุขอยู่เสมอ
Thooe mii khwaam-sùk yùu sà-mǒoe
“She is always happy.”

Opposite word: เศร้า (sâo), which means “sad” in Thai.

22- Sad

Thai adjective: เศร้า (sâo)

Example:
ดาเศร้าที่สัตว์เลี้ยงของเธอตาย
Daa sâo thîi sàt-líiang khǎawng thooe dtaai
“Daa is sad that her pet died.”

Opposite word: มีความสุข (mii khwaam-sùk), which means “happy” in Thai.

23- Moody

Thai adjective: หงุดหงิด (ngùt-ngìt)

Example:
วันนี้มินท์หงุดหงิดทั้งวันเลย
Wan-níi mín ngùt-ngìt tháng-wan looei
“Min has been moody all day.”

Opposite word: ร่าเริง (râa-rooeng), which means “cheerful” in Thai.

24- Lonely

Thai adjective: เหงา (ngǎo)

Example:
ฉันอยู่คนเดียวมาหลายวันแล้ว เหงามาก
Chǎn yùu khon-diiao maa lǎai wan láaeo ngǎo mâak
“I have been alone for many days. I’m so lonely.”

25- Cheerful

Thai adjective: ร่าเริง (râa-rooeng)

Example:
นัทเป็นคนร่าเริง
Nát bpen khon râa-rooeng
“Nat is a cheerful person.”

Opposite word: หงุดหงิด (ngùt-ngìt), which means “moody” in Thai.

26- Concerned

Thai adjective: กังวล (gang-won)

Example:
ช่วงนี้งานมีปัญหาทำให้ปลากังวล
Chûuang-níi ngaan mii bpan-hǎa tham hâi bplaa gang-won
“Recently there is a work problem making Plaa feel concerned.”

6. Thai Adjectives for Describing Speed, Difficulty & Importance

The fifth group of Thai adjectives are words used to describe speed, difficulty, and importance in Thai.

1- Fast

Thai adjective: เร็ว (reo)

Example:
รถคันนี้นเร็วมาก
Rót khan nán reo mâak
“That car is very fast.”

Opposite word: ช้า (cháa), which means “slow” in Thai.

2- Slow

Thai adjective: ช้า (cháa)

Example:
เต่าเป็นสัตว์ที่เชื่องช้า
Dtào bpen sàt thîi chûueang-cháa
“The turtle is a slow animal.”

Opposite word: เร็ว (reo), which means “fast” in Thai.

3- Difficult

Thai adjective: ยาก (yâak)

Example:
ทำไมฉันได้งานยากตลอด
Tham-mai chǎn dâi ngaan yâak dtà-làawt
“Why do I always get difficult tasks?”

Opposite word: ง่าย (ngáai), which means “easy” in Thai.

4- Easy

Thai adjective: ง่าย (ngáai)

Example:
นักเรียนชอบการบ้านง่าย
Nák-riian châawp gaan-bâan ngâai-ngâai
“Students like easy homework.”

Opposite word: ยาก (yâak), which means “difficult” in Thai.

5- Important

Thai adjective: สำคัญ (sǎm-khan)

Example:
เก็บเอกสารสำคัญดี ๆ
Gèp èek-gà-sǎan sǎm-khan dii-dii
“Keep important documents well.”

Opposite word: ไม่สำคัญ (mâi sǎm-khan), which means “unimportant” in Thai.

6- Unimportant

Thai adjective: ไม่สำคัญ (mâi sǎm-khan)

Example:
อย่ามองว่าสุขภาพเป็นเรื่องไม่สำคัญ
Yàa maawng wâa sùk-khà-phâap bpen rûueang mâi sǎm-khan
“Don’t view health as an unimportant matter.”

Opposite word: สำคัญ (sǎm-khan), which means “important” in Thai.

7. Thai Adjectives for Describing Color

The sixth group of Thai adjectives are those used to describe color in Thai. สี (sǐi) is “color” in Thai, and sometimes Thai people put สี (sǐi) in front of the color name.

1- White

Thai adjective: ขาว (khǎao)

Example:
ฉันชอบเสื้อผ้าสีขาว
Chǎn châawp sûuea-phâa sǐi khǎao
“I like white clothes.”

2- Black

Thai adjective: ดำ (dam)

Example:
กระเป๋าดำใบนั้นสวยดี
Grà-bpǎo dam bai nán sǔuai dii
“That black bag is beautiful.”

3- Purple

Thai adjective: ม่วง (mûuang)

Example:
ดอกไม้สีม่วงปลูกยากมั๊ย
Dàawk-mái sǐi mûuang bplùuk yâak mái
“Is it difficult to grow purple flowers?”

4- Light blue

Thai adjective: ฟ้า (fáa)

Example:
ท้องฟ้าเป็นสีฟ้าสวยมากวันนี้
Tháawng-fáa bpen sǐi fáa sǔuai mâak wan-níi
“Today, the sky is beautifully light blue.”

5- Dark blue

Thai adjective: น้ำเงิน (nám-ngooen)

Example:
พ่อชอบสีน้ำเงิน
Phâaw châawp sǐi nám-ngooen
“My father likes dark blue color.”

6- Green

Thai adjective: เขียว (khǐiao)

Example:
ต้นไม้สีเขียวดูร่มรื่น
Dtôn-mái sǐi khǐiao duu rôm-rûuen
“The green tree looks so shady.”

7- Yellow

Thai adjective: เหลือง (lǔueang)

Example:
แม่ชอบดอกไม้สีเหลือง
Mâae châawp dàawk-mái sǐi lǔueang
“My mother likes yellow flowers.”

8- Orange

Thai adjective: ส้ม (sôm)

Example:
ข้างในกล่องสีส้มมีอะไร
Khâang nai glàawng sǐi sôm mii à-rai
“What is inside the orange box?”

9- Red

Thai adjective: แดง (daaeng)

Example:
ครูใช้ปากกาแดงตรวจการบ้าน
Khruu chái bpàak-gaa daaeng dtrùuat gaan-bâan
“Teachers use a red pen to check homework.”

10- Brown

Thai adjective: น้ำตาล (nám-dtaan)

Example:
รองเท้าสีน้ำตาลคู่นั้นสวยดี
Raawng-tháo sǐi nám-dtaan khûu nán sǔuai dii
“Those brown shoes are beautiful.”

11- Gray

Thai adjective: เทา (thao)

Example:
ใส่ไว้ในกล่องเทาเลย
Sài wái nai glàawng thao looei
“Put it in the gray box.”

12- Pink

Thai adjective: ชมพู (chom-phuu)

Example:
ขนมเค้กสีชมพูอร่อยมาก
Khà-nhǒm-khéek sǐi chom-phuu à-ràauy mâak
“Pink cake is very delicious.”

13- Dark

Thai adjective: เข้ม (khêem)

Example:
น้องชายชอบรองเท้าสีเข้ม
Nǎawng-chaai châawp raawng-tháo sǐi khêem
“My younger brother likes dark shoes.”

Opposite word: อ่อน (àawn), which means “light” in Thai.

14- Light

Thai adjective: อ่อน (àawn)

Example:
น้องสาวของสีชมพูอ่อน
Náawng-sǎo châawp sǐi chom-phuu àawn
“My younger sister likes light pink.”

Opposite word: เข้ม (khêem), which means “dark” in Thai.

8. Thai Adjectives for Describing Shape & Texture

The seventh group of adjectives are words used to describe shape and texture in Thai.

1- Round

Thai adjective: กลม (glom)

Example:
ปั้นแป้งเป็นก้อนกลม
Bpân bpâaeng bpen gâawn glom-glom
“Make the dough in a round shape.”

Opposite word: เหลี่ยม (lìiam), which means “edged” or “square” in Thai.

2- Edged / Square

Thai adjective: เหลี่ยม (lìiam)

Example:
ลายเหลี่ยม ๆ ไม่สวยเลย
Laai lìiam-lìiam mâi sǔuai looei
“The edged pattern isn’t beautiful.”

Opposite word: กลม (glom), which means “round” in Thai.

3- Smooth

Thai adjective: เรียบ (rîiap)

Example:
โต๊ะไม้ตัวนี้ผิวเรียบมาก
Dtó mái dtuua níi phǐu rîiap mâak
“This wood table has a very smooth surface.”

Opposite word: ขรุขระ (khrù-khrà), which means “rough” in Thai.

4- Rough

Thai adjective: ขรุขระ (khrù-khrà)

Example:
ถนนขรุขระ ขับรถดี ๆ
Thà-nǒn khrù-khrà khàp rót dii-dii
“The road is rough, so drive carefully.”

Opposite word: เรียบ (rîiap), which means “smooth” in Thai.

9. Thai Food Adjectives: Describing Taste

The eighth group of adjectives are words used to describe food in Thai. รส (rót) or รสชาติ (rót-châat) is “taste” in Thai language.

1- Bland

Thai adjective: จืด (jùuet)

Example:
น้ำแกงจืดมาก ลืมใส่ซีอิ๊วรึเปล่า
Nám-gaaeng jùuet mâak luuem sài sii-íu rúe bplào
“The soup is so bland. Did you forget to put in soy sauce?”

2- Salty

Thai adjective: เค็ม (khem)

Example:
ไก่ทอดนี้เค็มกำลังดีเลย
Gài thâawt níi khem gam-lang dii looei
“This fried chicken is perfectly salty.”

3- Sweet

Thai adjective: หวาน (wǎan)

Example:
อาหารจานนี้ต้องหวานนิดหน่อยถึงจะอร่อย
Aa-hǎan jaan níi dtâawng wǎan nít-nàauy thǔeng jà à-ràauy
“This food must be a little sweet to be delicious.”

4- Oily

Thai adjective: มัน (man)

Example:
แม่ไม่ชอบอาหารมัน
Mâae mâi châawp aa-hǎan man-man
“My mother doesn’t like oily food.”

5- Sour

Thai adjective: เปรี้ยว (bprîiao)

Example:
ไอติมรสนี้หวานอมเปรี้ยวกำลังดี
Ai-dtim rót níi wǎan om bprîiao gam-lang dii
“This ice cream has a perfectly sweet and sour flavor.”

6- Spicy

Thai adjective: เผ็ด (phèt)

Example:
คนไทยชอบอาหารรสเผ็ด
Khon thai châawp aa-hǎan rót phèt
“Thai people like spicy food.”

7- Bitter

Thai adjective: ขม (khǒm)

Example:
เด็ก ๆ ไม่ชอบยาเพราะขม
Dèk-dèk mâi châawp yaa phráw khǒm
“Children don’t like medicine because it is bitter.”

8- Delicious

Thai adjective: อร่อย (à-ràauy)

Example:
ขนมของแม่อร่อยมาก
Khà-nǒm khǎawng mâae à-ràauy mâak
“My mother’s snack is very delicious.”

Opposite word: ไม่อร่อย (mâi à-ràauy), which means “not delicious” in Thai.

9- กลมกล่อม

Thai adjective: กลมกล่อม (glom-glàawm)

Meaning: Perfectly balanced taste, usually used to describe delicious food.

Example:
แกงนี้อร่อยกลมกล่อมมาก
Gaaeng níi à-ràauy glom-glàawm mâak
“This curry has a perfectly balanced taste, very delicious.”

Is this Delicious?

10. Thai Adjectives for Describing Situations

The ninth group of adjectives are words used to describe situations in Thai.

1- Fun

Thai adjective: สนุก (sà-nùk)

Example:
งานเลี้ยงสนุกมาก
Ngaan-líiang sà-nùk mâak
“Parties are very fun.”

Opposite word: น่าเบื่อ (nâa-bùuea), which means “boring” in Thai.

Fun Party

2- Boring

Thai adjective: น่าเบื่อ (nâa-bùuea)

Example:
พ่อบอกว่าไปซื้อของเป็นกิจกรรมน่าเบื่อ
Phâaw bàawk wâa bpai súue-khǎawng bpen gìt-jà-gam nâa-bùuea
“My father said ‘shopping is a boring activity.’”

Opposite word: สนุก (sà-nùk), which means “fun” in Thai.

3- Dangerous

Thai adjective: อันตราย (an-dtà-raai)

Example:
กลางคืนอย่าออกไปไหนคนเดียว อันตราย
Glaang-khuuen yàa àawk bpai nǎi khon diiao an-dtà-raai
“Don’t go out alone at night. It is dangerous.”

Opposite word: ปลอดภัย (bplàawt-phai), which means “safe” in Thai.

4- Safe

Thai adjective: ปลอดภัย (bplàawt-phai)

Example:
ใส่หมวกกันน็อคเพื่อความปลอดภัย
Sài mùuak-gan-náwk phûuea khwaam bplàawt-phai
“Wear a helmet for safety.”

Opposite word: อันตราย (an-dtà-raai), which means “dangerous” in Thai.

5- Weird

Thai adjective: แปลก (bplàaek)

Example:
แก้มทำท่าทางแปลก
Gâaem tham thâa-thaang bplàaek-bplàaek
“Gaaem is acting weird.”

6- Awkward

Thai adjective: อึดอัด (ùet-àt)

Example:
ฉันรู้สึกอึดอัดเวลาต้องทำงานกับคนแปลกหน้า
Chǎn rúu-sùek ùet-àt wee-laa dtâawng tham-ngan gàp khon-bplàaek-nâa
“I feel awkward when I have to work with strangers.”

7- Wonderful

Thai adjective: ยอดเยี่ยม (yâawt-yîiam)

Example:
การแสดงนี้ยอดเยี่ยมสุด ๆ
Gaan sà-daaeng níi yâawt-yîiam sùt-sùt
“This show is extremely wonderful.”

11. Describing Physical Traits, Conditions & Appearance

The last group of Thai adjectives you should learn are words used to describe a person in Thai.

1- Young (male)

Thai adjective: หนุ่ม (nùm)

Example:
ยังหนุ่มอยู่แท้ ๆ แต่ร่างกายกลับอ่อนแอ
Yang nùm yùu tháae-tháae dtàae râang-gaai glàp àawn-aae
“Despite being young, he is weak.”

Opposite word: แก่ (gàae), which means “old” in Thai.

2- Young (female)

Thai adjective: สาว (sǎao)

Example:
หญิงสาวพวกนี้สวยมาก
Yǐng-sǎao phûuak níi sǔuai mâak
“These young women are very beautiful.”

Opposite word: แก่ (gàae), which means “old” in Thai.

3- Old

Thai adjective: แก่ (gàae)

Example:
ยายของฉันแก่มากแล้ว
Yaai khǎawng chǎn gàae mâak láaeo
“My grandmother is very old now.”

Opposite word: หนุ่ม (nùm) and สาว (sǎao), which mean “young” in Thai.

4- Strong

Thai adjective: แข็งแรง (khǎaeng-raaeng)

Example:
ถึงเขาจะตัวเล็ก แต่แข็งแรงมาก
Thǔeng khǎo jà dtuua lék dtàae khǎaeng-raaeng mâak
“Despite being small, he is very strong.”

Opposite word: อ่อนแอ (àawn-aae), which means “weak” in Thai.

5- Weak

Thai adjective: อ่อนแอ (àawn-aae)

Example:
ฉันออกกำลังกายเพราะไม่อยากร่างกายอ่อนแอ
Chǎn àawk-gam-lang-gaai phráw mâi yàak râang-gaai àawn-aae
“I exercise because I don’t want to be weak.”

Opposite word: แข็งแรง (khǎaeng-raaeng), which means “strong” in Thai.

6- Rich

Thai adjective: รวย (ruuai)

Example:
อ้นรวยมาก
Ôn ruuai mâak
“On is very rich.”

Opposite word: จน (jon), which means “poor” in Thai.

7- Poor

Thai adjective: จน (jon)

Example:
ฉันไม่อยากจน
Chǎn mâi yàak jon
“I don’t want to be poor.”

Opposite word: รวย (ruuai), which means “rich” in Thai.

8- Charming

Thai adjective: มีเสน่ห์ (mii sà-nèe)

Example:
พ่อเป็นคนมีเสน่ห์
Phâaw bphen khon mii sà-nèe
“My father is a charming guy.”

9- Beautiful

Thai adjective: สวย (sǔuai)

Example:
ดาราคนนั้นสวยมาก
Daa-raa khon nán sǔuai mâak
“That celebrity is very beautiful.”

Opposite word: น่าเกลียด (nâa-glìiat), which means “ugly” in Thai.

10- Handsome

Thai adjective: หล่อ (làaw)

Example:
ใคร ๆ ก็ชอบคนหล่อ
Khrai-khrai gâaw châawp khon làaw
“Everyone likes handsome people.”

Opposite word: น่าเกลียด (nâa-glìiat), which means “ugly” in Thai.

11- Cute

Thai adjective: น่ารัก (nâa-rák)

Example:
เด็กคนนั้นน่าตาน่ารักมาก ๆ
Dèk khon nán nâa-dtaa nâa-rák mâak-mâak
“That child looks very cute.”

Opposite word: น่าเกลียด (nâa-glìiat), which means “ugly” in Thai.

12- Ugly

Thai adjective: น่าเกลียด (nâa-glìiat)

Example:
เวลาเธอทำหน้าแบบนั้นดูน่าเกลียดมาก
Wee-laa thooe tham nâa bàaep nán duu nâa-glìiat mâak
“She looks very ugly when she makes that face.”

Opposite word: หล่อ (làaw), สวย (sǔuai), and น่ารัก (nâa-rák), which mean “handsome,” “beautiful,” and “cute” respectively in Thai.

13- Fat

Thai adjective: อ้วน (ûuan)

Example:
ถ้ากินของทอดมากเกินไปจะทำให้อ้วน
Thâa gin khǎawng-thâawt mâak gooen bpai jà tham hâi ûuan
“Eating too much fried food will make you fat.”

Opposite word: ผอม (phǎawm), which means “thin” in Thai.

14- Thin

Thai adjective: ผอม (phǎawm)

Example:
แจมผอมเกินไปจนดูสุขภาพไม่ดี
Jaaem phǎawm gooen bpai jon duu sùk-khà-phâap mâi dii
“Jam is too thin to the point she looks unhealthy.”

Opposite word: อ้วน (ûuan), which means “fat” in Thai.

12. Conclusion

Congratulations! Reaching this part of the lesson means you’ve already learned more than 100 Thai adjectives. How do you feel? Did you have fun learning Thai adjectives? You may feel a bit overwhelmed since there’s a lot to remember.

However, there’s no need to rush. You can try to remember a few Thai adjectives a day. Within a month or two, you’ll be able to remember them all. Try using them a lot in conversation and remember adjectives in Thai phrases to make it even easier. Also, you should remember Thai adjectives in pairs if they have an opposite word. So keep practicing.

And as always, don’t forget to check out other fun lessons at ThaiPod101.com, such as travel phrases you should know or important days in Thailand, once you’ve finished learning Thai adjectives.

Happy learning!

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Netflix Thailand: Watch Good Thai Movies to Learn Thai

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Despite your willingness to learn the Thai language, traditional learning methods such as reading books and memorizing new vocabulary can be extremely boring. What’s a better way to learn the Thai language? As you may have guessed, watching Thai movies or shows on Netflix (Thailand) is the best way to do so. You can watch Thai Netflix on the app or on your web browser. Even better? The Thai Netflix price is very cheap, as low as 105 Baht/month.

Now, you may wonder if you’ll be able to understand what you’re watching if you’ve just started learning Thai. Does Netflix have Thai subtitles? The answer is yes! And even if you can’t read Thai yet, watching Thai Netflix series or Thai Netflix movies is still good practice for Thai learners.

On Netflix, Thai language movies can introduce you to Thai accents, which in turn can improve your listening and speaking skills. Also, if you can read some Thai, reading Thai subtitles on Netflix will surely improve your reading skills. Moreover, you get to learn more about how Thai people live their daily lives in context of Thai culture.

There are a lot of Thai movies and Thai TV series on Netflix. To get the most out of the time you spend watching, be sure to choose one that fits your tastes the most. If you’re a fan of Netflix Original Series, you’ll have to wait a while, though, as Thai Netflix Original Series are just now being filmed. And as for Thai TV shows on Netflix, there are currently none available; but hopefully, Netflix will decide to put some in.

We understand that you may have no idea where to start on Thai Netflix, so ThaiPod101.com will help you by providing the best Netflix Thailand movie list for Thai learners, including new Thai movies on Netflix 2019!

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Table of Contents

  1. Bangkok Traffic Love Story
  2. Suddenly Twenty
  3. Suckseed
  4. Mae Bia
  5. Nang Nak
  6. Bangrajan
  7. Ong Bak
  8. Hormones
  9. Stupid Cupid
  10. Diary of Tootsies
  11. Conclusion

1. Bangkok Traffic Love Story

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Thai title: รถไฟฟ้ามาหานะเธอ (rót-fai-fáa maa hǎa ná thooe)

Movie information:

This is one of the best romantic Thai movies on Netflix. It portrays the story of an average Chinese-Thai office lady who falls in love with a BTS sky train engineer.

Because of this movie, ท้องฟ้าจำลอง (tháawng-fáa jam-laawng), or Bangkok Planetarium, became a popular place for couples to go on dates. The male leading actor is Ken Teeradech, and the female leading actor is Cris Howang.

Movie quotes:

1- แฟนเค้าไม่ได้มีเพื่ออยู่ด้วยกันตลอดเวลา แต่มีเพื่อให้รู้ว่า ยังมีคนที่รักและเป็นห่วงเรา

Thai pronunciation: faaen kháo mâi dâi mii phûuea yùu dûuai gan dtà-làawt wee-laa dtàae mii phûuea hâi rúu wâa yang mii khon thîi rák láe bpen hùuang rao

English meaning: “We are not in a relationship so that we have someone with us all the time, but so that we have someone who loves and cares about us.”

2- ตอนแรกก็ว่าจะไม่คิด แต่มันฝืนความรู้สึกไม่ได้จริงๆ

Thai pronunciation: dtaawn-râaek gâaw wâa jà mâi khít dtàae man fǔuen khwaam-rúu-sùek mâi dâi jing jing

English meaning: “I didn’t mean to at first, but I can’t help my feelings.”

3- ถ้าเป็นหนังรักทั่วไป มันต้องทันไม่ใช่หรอ

Thai pronunciation: thâa bpen nǎng rák thûua-bpai man dtâawng than mâi châi rǒoe

English meaning: “If this is a normal love story, should I be there in time?”

2. Suddenly Twenty

Thai title: 20 ใหม่ ยูเทิร์นวัย หัวใจรีเทิร์น (yîi-sìp mài yuu-thooen wai hǔua-jai rii-thooen)

Movie information:

This is a comedy, romance, and Thai Netflix drama, remade from the Korean and Chinese movies. It’s the story of a 74-year-old grandmother who’s very stubborn and seems unable to get along with her family. Her family plans to send her to a nursing home, but miraculously, her body becomes twenty again. So she decides to use this chance to live her life and build a good relationship with her family again.

In this Thai Netflix movie, you’ll get to see how old people talk compared to the younger generation. The leading actress is Mai Davika.

This is one of the Thai films on Netflix that you shouldn’t miss!

Movie quote: The question and answer shown below are the core of this movie.

1- ถ้าย้อนเวลากลับไปได้ คุณจะใช้ชีวิตแบบใด จะใช้เวลาอย่างไร จะทำอะไรที่ใจอยากทำแต่ไม่ได้ทำ ใช่หรือเปล่า?

Thai pronunciation: thâa yáawn wee-laa glàp bpai dâi khun jà chái chii wít bàaeb dai jà chái wee-laa yàang-rai jà tham à-rai thîi jai yàak tham dtàae mâi dâi tham châi rǔue bplào

English meaning: “If you could turn back time, how would you live your life? How would you spend your time? Would you do things you wanted to do, but didn’t get to do in the past?”

2- ถ้าย้อนเวลากลับไปได้ ฉันก็จะทำเหมือนเดิม

Thai pronunciation: thâa yáawn wee-laa glàp bpai dâi chǎn gâaw jà tham mǔuean-dooem

English meaning: “If I could turn back time, I would still do the same.”

3. Suckseed

Thai title: ซักซี๊ด ห่วยขั้นเทพ (sák-síit hùuai khân thêep)

Movie information:

This Thai Netflix movie is in the romantic-comedy genre, portraying the lives of youngsters.

A boy who’s clueless about everything music-related learns much about it from his first love. Sadly, they eventually have to be separated from each other. Despite being terrible at everything, in twelfth grade, Ped plans to sign up for a famous music contest called the Hot Wave Music Award.

The name of this movie reflects the male leading character and his journey from sucking at everything to actually succeeding. The movie itself was not bad in terms of revenue and public comment, and the original soundtrack is pretty famous.

If you’re looking for a great feel-good movie, this is one of the best Thai movies on Netflix for you!

Movie quotes:

1- เวลาฟังเพลง จะรู้สึกว่ามีเพื่อน

Thai pronunciation: wee-laa fang phleeng jà rúu-sùek wâa mii phûuean

English meaning: “When I listen to music, I feel like I have a friend with me.”

2- นี่มันยุคของเราแล้ว

Thai pronunciation: nîi man yúk khǎawng rao láaeo

English meaning: “It is our time now.”

3- เราก็ยังเหมือนเดิม

Thai pronunciation: rao gâaw yang mǔuean-dooem

English meaning: “I’m also the same.”

4. Mae Bia

Thai title: แม่เบี้ย (mâae bîia)

Movie information:

Mae Bia is one of the best Thai movies Netflix has right now, and people pay a lot of attention to this one because it’s a drama-erotic movie. The story involves old Thai-styled houses, cobras, supernatural events, and a romantic relationship—these elements together made for an S.E.A. writing award-winning movie! And as this story happens in สุพรรณบุรี (sù-phan-bù-rii), you’ll get to hear another local dialect which has a slightly different tone compared to how Thai people normally speak.

The male actor of this movie is very famous, and acts very well. For those who love this kind of story, luckily, this Thai movie is on Netflix now.

Movie quotes:

1- เรื่องของผู้หญิงผู้ชาย ไม่มีอะไรที่เป็นไปไม่ได้

Thai pronunciation: rûueang khǎawng phûu-yǐng phûu-chaai mâi mii à-rai thîi bpen bpai mâi dâi

English meaning: “There is nothing impossible when it comes to things between man and woman.”

5. Nang Nak

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Thai title: นางนาก (naang nâak)

Movie information:

Thai people love the horror genre, and do it well in their movies. And when speaking of horror stories, every Thai knows the story of นางนาก (naang nâak). It’s the story of a woman who died while giving birth to her child, and waited as a ghost for her husband to come back from war.

Since this story is so famous, it has been made into TV series, movies, and musicals many times. However, this version is said to be the scariest, and it’s one of the very best Netflix Thai horror movies! If you like horror stories, don’t miss this Thai horror movie on Netflix. Many people have said that it’s the scariest movie they’ve ever seen.

The main female actress, Sai, is very famous for her action in horror films. Also, as this story is believed to have happened more than a hundred years ago, you’ll get to see how Thai people lived and spoke in the past.

Movie quotes:

1- พี่มากขา

Thai pronunciation: phîi mâak khǎa

English meaning: There is no English meaning. This is just what นางนาก (naang-nâak) calls her husband.

2- ฉันมารอพี่ที่ท่าน้ำทุกวันเลยนะ

Thai pronunciation: chǎn maa raaw phîi thîi thâa-nám thúk wan looei ná

English meaning: “I have been coming to the dock every day to wait for you.”

6. Bangrajan

Genres of Movies

Thai title: บางระจัน (baang-rá-jan)

Movie information:

If you like historical movies, don’t miss บางระจัน (baang-rá-jan). It portrays the story of people in หมู่บ้านบางระจัน (mùu-bâan baang-rá-jan), or Bangrajan Village, who help prolong the end of อยุธยา (à-yút-thá-yaa). Despite losing the fight in the end, people in this village are known as Thai heroes.

It was a very successful movie that made both the leading actor and actress very popular. Similar to นางนาก (naang nâak), you’ll get to see how Thai people lived and spoke in the past, as this story happened over 200 years ago. Definitely a great Thai film Netflix currently has for history-lovers!

War

Movie quote:

The most touching expression of this movie is below. It shows the sacrifice of people for their homeland, as well as their love for family.

1- หากวันข้างหน้าข้าไม่ได้สั่งสอนมัน เอ็งจงบอกมันว่าข้าไม่ได้จากไปไหน ข้าจักอยู่ในผืนดิน ในต้นไม้ ในสายน้ำ ข้าจักเป็นคนคอยคุ้มหัวมันเอง

Thai pronunciation: hàak wan khâang nâa khâa mâi dâi sàng-sǎawn man eng jong bàawk man wâa khâa mâi dâi jàak bpai nǎi khâa jàk yùu nai phǔuen-din nai dtôn-mái nai sǎai-nám khâa jàk bpen khon khaauy khúm-hǔua man eeng

English meaning: “If in the future, I don’t get a chance to teach our child, you must tell them that I didn’t go away from them. I am in the land, in the tree, in the river. I will protect them.”

7. Ong Bak

Thai title: องค์บาก (ong-bàak)

Movie information:

This is one of the most famous Thai action Netflix films. It’s the story of two men trying to take the stolen head of Buddha back. The action scenes are said to be very good and thrilling. As the main character is from northeast Thailand, you’ll get to hear ภาษาอีสาน (phaa-sǎa ii-sǎan), which is the Thai Northeast dialect.

This was a successful movie, and has been made into three films. If you want to watch a Muay Thai movie on Netflix, you absolutely can’t miss this one.

Movie quotes:

1- ช้างกูอยู่ไหน

Thai pronunciation: cháang guu yùu nǎi

English meaning: “Where is my elephant?”

Muay Thai

8. Hormones

Thai title: Hormones วัยว้าวุ่น (Hormones wai wáa-wûn)

Series information:

This Netflix Thai series shows the story of teenagers in high school. It reflects real-life problems that young people face, especially those that have to do with romantic relationships, sex, abuse in school, drugs, family problems, etc. It was one of the first Thai series on Netflix to focus on multiple points of view, and not just on romantic relationships like most Thai series.

This series is so successful that it’s continuing for a third season.

Series quotes:

1- มันเป็นธรรมเนียมที่ทำต่อๆ กันมา

Thai pronunciation: man bpen tham-niiam thîi tham dtàaw dtàaw gan maa

English meaning: “It is the tradition that people have been doing from generation to generation.”

2- เพราะมันไม่ใช่คำตอบที่พวกเธอถูกใจรึเปล่า?

Thai pronunciation: phráw man mâi châi kham-dtàawp thîi phûuak thooe thùuk jai rúe bplào

English meaning: “Isn’t it because it is not the answer you like?”

3- คนอย่างพวกเธอใช้ชีวิตทำโน่นนี่ตามผู้ใหญ่ โดยที่ไม่มีใครเคยตั้งคำถาม

Thai pronunciation: khon yàang phûuak thooe chái chii-wít tham nôon tham nîi dtaam phûu-yài dooi thîi mâi mii khrai khooei dtâng kham-thǎam

English meaning: “People like you like to live doing what adults say without asking questions.”

4- ครูไม่ชอบระบบและคน แต่สิ่งที่ทำให้ครูมีความสุขคือนักเรียน

Thai pronunciation: khruu mâi châawp rá-bòp láe khon dtàae sìng thîi tham hâi khruu mii khwaam-sùk khuue nák-riian

English meaning: “I (teacher) don’t like systems or people. But students make me happy.”

Teacher & Student

9. Stupid Cupid

Thai title: น้ำตากามเทพ (nám-dtaa gaam-má-thêep)

Series information:

This is another Netflix Thai drama you shouldn’t miss, a melodrama series starring famous actor Sunny. It’s the story of a rich family, and covers themes such as arranged marriage in Thailand and no-so-good relationships between family members.

Actually, this was a short drama shown in the movie Bangkok Traffic Love Story. But with the good response from viewers due to its ironic context, it has been made into a TV series. This is currently one of the best Thai dramas on Netflix, and many people love it because it’s fun to watch.

Series quotes:

1- ถ้าจะพูดอย่างนี้ ด่าว่าควายเลยดีกว่ามั๊ย

Thai pronunciation: thâa jà phûut yàang níi dàa wâa khwaai looei dii gwàa mái

English meaning: “If you spoke like that, you should have berated me as a buffalo.” (stupid)

2- ตอแหล

Thai pronunciation: dtaaw-lǎae

English meaning: “Liar”

10. Diary of Tootsies

Thai title: ไดอารี่ ตุ๊ดซี่ (dai-aa-rîi dtút-sîi)

Series information:

This is a Thai comedy Netflix series based on the story บันทึกของตุ๊ด (ban-thúek khǎawng dtút) of Sha, a famous LGBT Thai person. It’s the story of a group of LGBT friends who all get dumped at the same time and decide to find their true love. This series is quite successful and has gained a lot of attention. In 2019, both a second season and movie are going to be released. This is yet another Thai series on Netflix you shouldn’t miss.

In terms of Thai language, this show will give you a unique glimpse into slang often used by the LGBTQ community in Thailand, as well some swear words.

Series quotes:

Here’s a quote from the show that went viral at the time. Many people use this scene to give their own sarcastic message on almost any topic, from politics to relationships.

1- กูจะขี้ใส่อะไรก็ได้

Thai pronunciation: guu jà khîi sài à-rai gâaw dâi

English meaning: “I can defecate on anything.”

2- แต่มึงจะขี้ใส่ Louis Vuitton ไม่ได้

Thai pronunciation: dtàae mueng jà khîi sài Louis Vuitton mâi dâi

English meaning: “But you cannot defecate on Louis Vuitton.”

11. Conclusion

How many movies or Thai Netflix series here fit your tastes? We hope you decided to try watching many of them! And once you’ve watched one of these movies or series, please leave a comment below to tell us what you thought about it!

By now, you should have a better idea of how to learn Thai on Netflix and how to watch Thai Netflix for maximum enjoyment and learning!

As mentioned before, we believe that watching Netflix movies with Thai subtitles is a great way for you to learn Thai, since it’s enjoyable and will help you improve your Thai speaking skills. If you don’t understand what an actor or actress said, don’t give up just yet. It will take some time for you to be able to understand.

If you want to learn another Thai lesson, visit ThaiPod101.com. We have various topics to choose from, such as delicious Thai fruit and activities in summer in Thailand. And if you want to watch more Thai content, go check out our Thai TV show article.

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